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Lebanese Landmine Survivors Football ...
Sidon
By Andreanewilliams
15 Sep 2014

A football team for victims of landmines, called The Lebanese Landmine Survivors Team, was launched in 2001 by the The Lebanese Welfare Association for the Handicapped (LWAH), to bring survivors together once a week to play football and help cope with their injuries.

Today the group is still developing and the players play with their prosthetic limbs on. They even play against teams from other associations who do not suffer handicaps. The team is comprised of 15 players and aims to gather as many young people as possible who suffer war injuries and help them develop psychologically and socially. The team is the only one of its kind in Lebanon and the Arab World. Even on a world level, there aren’t any teams that play while wearing prosthetic limbs.

Today Lebanon is relatively peaceful, but a 15-year civil war and conflicts with neighboring countries, such as Israel and Syria, have left unexploded land mines and cluster munitions across swathes of the tiny country. Between 1975-2012 these unexploded devices killed 903 people and injured a further 2,780. The Mines Advisory Group (MAG), a British NGO that works to clear unexploded ordinances in Lebanon, says that the number of accidents has recently increased.
The Lebanese Mine Action Centre (LMAC) aims to clear all cluster munitions by 2016 and almost all land mines by 2020. However, it is likely that these deadlines will not be met. When the land mines were laid, mostly during Lebanon’s civil war, no record of the locations was kept. It is impossible to know how many of the 4m cluster bombs that Israel fired on Lebanon during the 2006 war, failed to explode and still remain a danger.

Translation

(Man, Arabic): Dr. Bachir Abdul Hak, coach of the Lebanese survivor team:

(02:10) We had the idea of establishing this team in the Lebanese welfare association for the handicapped in the 1998, but we did not execute it until the year of 2000. We believe that all young men who suffer from a certain handicap need the physical and the athletic exercise to help them build their bodies, improve their physical and psychological health, and get out of their isolation. that is how the idea started, to provide a service that would help them socially and psychologically. (02:52)

(03:32) The team became like a family to me, we have been together for 14 years,all the children you see in the filed were born with us. i care a lot about this team and I give it all my time, and effort because it deserves the attention from us to be able to succeed. (05:52)

(Man, English) Ali Srour, player, 31 year old civil servant, from Aita al-Chaab, South of Lebanon. he lost his leg in a hunting trip near his village in 2001:

(04:04) (04:34)

(04:55) (05:25)

(05:34) (05:56)

(06:00) (06:26)

(06:31) (06:53)

(Woman, English) Habiba Aoun, Coordinator of Land-mine research center (Balamand University)

(07:21) (09:15)

(09:24) (09:43)

(09:53) (10:49)

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 10
By Karim Mostafa
19 Apr 2014

Amjad Hussein, who worked on the fourth floor of the Rana Plaza, remembers falling and feeling an incredible pain. Then, everything went black. When he regained consciousness eleven days later, both of his legs were missing. He's now trying his new prosthetic legs for the first time.

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Rana Plaza and the Long Recovery 14
By Karim Mostafa
16 Apr 2014

Younus Ali and his daughter. The man had never heard of Rana Plaza until the morning of April 24, 2013. He was visiting a nephew in Savar when he heard the sound of the building collapsing. He ran to building and joined local rescuers who were the first on the site. He saved three people before being hit unconscious. Today, he cannot move the lower part of his body.

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A Dying Army, A Dying Clinic, and a D...
Reyhanli
By adrian
17 Mar 2014

In the Turkish border town of Rehyanli, sometimes dubbed the “rebel resort”, the injured and exhausted remnants of the once powerful Free Syrian Army seek medical treatment in a Syrian run clinic that itself is barely surviving.

Established by a defected Syrian Army medic, the clinic hosts both Syrian refugees and fighters injured in the war with a focus on long term rehabilitation. Amongst the patients is a young FSA fighter named Abu Djud. Abu Djud was an archaeology student from Aleppo who took up arms after the uprising began and was injured by shrapnel. He was evacuated to Dr. Rahhal’s clinic and had his leg amputated. He is now passing time in Reyhanli, waiting for his stump to heal and to buy a sports grade prosthetic leg. This story profiles the injured FSA fighters seeking treatment in Dr. Rahhal’s clinic. The stories of the once optimistic and now battered and sidelined young revolutionaries will reflect the withering of the Free Syrian Army in the face of growing radical opposition groups and an emboldened Syrian Army.

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Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
09 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Frame 0004
Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
09 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Frame 0004
Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
09 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (71 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Frame 0004
Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Frame 0004
Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (73 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (72 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (70 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (69 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (68 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (67 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (66 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (65 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (64 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (63 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (62 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (61 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (60 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (59 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (58 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (57 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (56 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (55 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (54 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (53 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (52 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (51 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (50 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (49 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (48 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (47 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (46 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (45 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (44 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (43 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.