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Spain's Southern Fortress: The Africa...
Melilla
By tclava
03 Jan 2015

A TEXTLESS NATURAL SOUND REPORT
VERSION WITH MUSIC TRACK AVAILABLE HERE: https://transterramedia.com/media/53117

Surrounded by a triple barrier 12 km long, controlled by dozens of cameras and continuous patrols, a small Spanish enclave in Moroccan territory called Melilla is – according to the Spanish government – a fortress under siege. It is a fortress which in recent years has faced increasing migratory pressure that has reached “unprecedented levels” according to Abdelmalik El Barkani, Madrid’s representative in Melilla.

Hiding in the forests of Oujda, Nador, and Selouane, nearly eighty-thousand migrants, mainly from sub-Saharan countries, are waiting for the right moment to slip across the frontier. Some go by boat or in a secret compartment of a car if they can afford it, but the majority try to jump the barriers surrounding Melilla. Spain and Europe stand silently by while every week hundreds of migrants risk their lives and allegedly face violent reprisals of the Moroccan police who they say beat, torture, rob and kill them. Meanwhile, Morocco is building a new barrier, a three meter deep ditch filled with barbed wire. Part of the 50 million euro project is reportedly funded by money Spain acquired from the EU, an accusation made by Spanish activists and media and never denied by Rajoy’s government.

A few kilometres from these barriers, on the slopes of mount Gurugu, in the forests overlooking Melilla, nearly four thousand migrants are waiting for the right time to jump across into the Spanish enclave and enter the CETI (Centro de Estancia Temporal de Inmigrantes), a collapsing first aid structure with two thousand people already inside. Gurugu seems a circle of Hell, where migrants live in inhuman conditions. In tents made of plastic bags, without water and food, heated only by firewood collected in the bush. Sought out by the Moroccan military, they have to hide like animals in the forest, digging in the garbage to find something to eat, walking miles on slippery rocks to drink. Systematically, every two days or so, at six in the morning, the soldiers break into Gurugu, destroying tents, burning, stealing what little the migrants were able to put aside, beating them and forcing people to jump down from the crags, arresting and bringing the detainees to Rabat.

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Mentally Disabled and Chained in Gaza
Beit Hanoun
By Sanaa Kamal , Zaher ghoul
21 Oct 2014

October 22, 2014
Beit Hanoun, Gaza Strip

21-year-old Jamil Attia Za’anin is one of thousands of Gazans who’s home was destroyed in the 2014 summer war with Israel. However, Jamil’s case is particularly bad as he suffers from a neurological disorder that has left him severely mentally disabled. Jamil now lives in a shack with his family with no access to proper healthcare. In fact, his disability itself is symptomatic of the living conditions in Gaza, as it is a result of substandard healthcare in the coastal enclave.

Jamil now spends his days chained in front of his temporary home because there is nowhere for him to go and his family fears he may run away. His younger brother Mohammad is also mentally disabled, albeit to less severe degree. The family’s situation is particularly desperate as their father Attaya is too old to work. Left with no working age males in the family, they are forced to rely on food handouts from the United Nations. The family now spends their days salvaging the rubble from their destroyed home, struggling to find enough money to eat, and trying to keep their two disabled boys safe and healthy.

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Handicapped in the rubble of gaza 21
Gaza
By Sanaa Kamal , Zaher ghoul
21 Oct 2014

October 22, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

Jamil Attia Za'anin with his mother Donia Za'anin. Jamil, 21, developed a spinal condition 16 years ago when he was just a child. Poor healthcare infrastructure in Gaza meant that doctors could not properly treat Jamil, so the disease spread to his brain, leaving him handicapped. Jamil lives with his ten family members in a shack in the town of Beit Hanoun in the north of the Gaza Strip. He has a younger brother Mohammed, 19, who is also handicapped and the family's situation was made even worse after their house was destroyed in the recent war with Israel.

Wheelchair Basketball Heals Wounds in...
Nablus
By adrian
25 Sep 2014

September 25, 2014 Nablus, Palestine Established in the aftermath of the First Intifada, Nablus' wheelchair basketball team is amongst the most prominent in the West Bank. The squad includes players from the city and surrounding villages as well as Nablus' three refugee camps, and features several members of the current Palestinian national team. Many of the members obtained their disabilities from injuries sustained during the first and second Intifadas. Others were either born with, or developed debilitating conditions. Mu'awia Muna, the head coach of the Nablus team, is clear to stress that the team makes no differentiation between the causes of players' disabilities and that the fundamental issue at hand is the need "to provide sporting opportunities for all disabled people". Wheelchair basketball was one of the first Paralympic sports to develop in Palestine and, more than twenty years after its establishment, the Nablus wheelchair basketball team continues to train weekly. However, there are many obstacles faced by the club in its quest to continue work. Access to potential training venues and playing surfaces present constant challenges. Many sporting facilities in Palestine are now quite old and are not equipped with suitable disabled access. Lack of funding is also a major issue for all Paralympic sports in Palestine. The Nablus team's current wheelchairs have seen many years of regular use and are now in desperate need of replacement. With sports wheelchairs costing as much as 2000 euro each, the team needs to secure substantial support in order to continue to provide for the needs of Nablus' disabled athletes.

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Albinism in Tanzania 03
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
23 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 23, 2014 - Sista Laurentina Bukombe doing a skin check-up during the trimestral meeting. She is a nun graduated in dermatology who is collaborating with Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre and Tulime Association, providing albinos with sunscreen lotion, medical check-ups and proper treatment if needed. In this area there had never been killings, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun.

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Albinism in Tanzania 02
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
21 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 21, 2014 - Alufema mends a carpet. She is one of the persons with albinism of the Kilolo District censed by the Tulime Association. There have never been killings in this area, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun. The census was fundamental in order to be able to help the albinos of the area with sunscreen cream and medical check-ups. The national census does not provide correct and actual data about albinism.

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Albinism in Tanzania 07
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
21 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 21, 2014 - Angela with one of her four children, none of whom have albinism. She is one of the persons with albinism of the Kilolo District censed by Tulime Association. There have never been killings in this area, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun. The census was fundamental in order to be able to help the albinos of the area with sunscreen cream and medical check-up. The national census does not provide correct and actual data about albinism.

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Sacrifice and Salvation: Albinism in ...
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
13 Jul 2014

“I was pretending to be asleep, but I saw them cutting her throat and drinking her blood, and then cutting her arms and legs…” These are the words of Mmindi, recalling the night in December 2008 when her 5-year-old sister, Mariam, was murdered in front of her.

Mariam had albinism. In the inner regions of Sub-Saharian Africa people with albinism have a very hard life. Not only do they need to fight against the cancer-causing rays of the harsh tropical sun, but they must also fight stigma and discrimination. Myths and stigmas about Albinos sometimes have horrific results. For examlpe, in recent years, traditional medicine has furthered the belief that albino body parts have elements with magical powers that give success and fortune. This myth has resulted in brutal killings of albinos with the aim of harvesting their body parts. Mariam was a victim of such an attack.

Another major struggle for albinos is protecting themselves from the sun. Those living in areas with little access to health care also struggle to protect themselves from the sun and treat problems arising from UV exposure. 

From the Lake Victoria region, where killings and discrimination still infringe upon these people's human rights, to the Iringa region tormented with an absence of healthcare, albinos in Tanzania are increasingly at risk as of late. The lack of proper information about albinism, in a country in which 1 out of 2.000 people is albino (in Europe and North America the ratio is 1 out of 20.000), leaves the doors to discrimination wide open. For these people, the Tanzanian government has never been able to guarantee health, education or security. Only through the help of N.G.O.s like Under The Same Sun and Tulime does a bright future seem possible for the albinos.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Albinism in Tanzania 08
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
10 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 10, 2014 - Before a race during sports day in Lake View School, Mwanza, Tanzania. albinos play sports early in the morning to avoid exposure to the hot sun.

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Albinism in Tanzania 04
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 05
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 06
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 09
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Masalu, 18 years old is both deaf and mute. She arrived with her two siblings at the Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania, after the last killing of an albino that took place in May 2014. She became pregnant after being raped. The center was the immediate answer by the government to the killings of albinos that started in 2007 in the lake area. Nowadays around 200 people of all ages are living in this center together.

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Albinism in Tanzania 10
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - A child dozes off in Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania. The center is defined as a school, but it hosts 200 people of all ages assisted by two teachers and living in precarious conditions.

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Albinism in Tanzania 01
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Courtyard of Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania. The center was the immediate answer of the government to the killings of albinos that started in 2007 in the lake area. Nowadays around 200 people of all ages are living in this center together.

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IMG_5425.jpg
Shumen
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A nurse plays with two children in the garden of Shumen Institution, the oldest institution in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

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Abandoned Children 02
Targovishte, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
01 Jul 2014

At the Turghoviste Institution, a nurse feeds a disabled little girl. At the institution, there are seven nurses for seven disabled children. Children with less severe disabilities have a higher chance of getting adopted.

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Abandoned Children 12
Targovishte, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
01 Jul 2014

Zlatka Rizaeva, a nurse at the Turghovist Institution, takes care of a young disabled boy in the room where all the seven disabled children sleep at the institution.
As Rizaeva introduces us to the seven children, a girl holds on her two legs. Others spend their days sleeping, coiled in their colored sheets, sometimes unable to move. "It is very hard this work with them," admits Rizaeva. "They need a lot of care. And then, our job is often depreciated. People have difficulty understanding our everyday life here. They do not think of the many positive things this kind of institution offers."

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"The Difference Between Lightning and...
Kabul, Afghanistan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
02 Dec 2013

The Disability Situation in Afghanistan

Community Centre for the Disabled (CCD), an Afghan NGO, is a resource centre is one of the leading disability organizations that has been promoting the rights of Persons with Disabilities since 2004. To this end, CCD maintains many activities.

In Afghanistan, 2.7% of the total population have very severe disabilities that call for the implementation of urgent policies and interventions. If other categories are added, this rate increases to well over 15%, as indicated in the 2011 World Health Organization disability report.

Based on the Social Protection Strategy and the National Risks and Vulnerability Assessment, one of the ‘Priorities at Risk Groups’ in Afghanistan is represented by Persons with Disabilities (PwDs). These people continue to undergo hefty challenges; no access to public services, society's negative attitudes, unemployment and physical accessibility are just some of the hardships. To improve this situation, disability needs to be given high priority in all policies of the government, private sector and civil society; and should be monitored for implementation. Providing direct enablement support to PwDs is another priority.

This quotation from Mark Twain, an American author and humorist, refers to the abyss between two different sources of light. The powerful flash of lightning against the faint glow of the firefly.The same analogy can be applied to the very different situations that persons with disabilities face up to in their lifetime and the way they handle them.

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"The Difference Between Lightning and...
By Giovanni Diffidenti
11 Nov 2013

Disability situation in Afghanistan is extremely severe, it calls for the implementation of urgent policies and interventions.
This quotation from Mark Twain, an American author and humorist, refers to the abyss between two different sources of light. The powerful flash of lightning against the faint glow of the firefly.The same analogy can be applied to the very different situations that persons with disabilities face up to in their lifetime and the way they handle them.

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"The Difference Between Lightning and...
Bamyan, Afghanistan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
31 Oct 2013

Bamyan cemetery.
Mohammed, 13 years old, prays at the grave of his cousin and best friend Haji Ahmad, 15 years old. Haji was an orphan and a Paraplegic and he lived with his sister. The rest of the family didn’t want to know about him. Before he died, Haji hadn’t been to school for almost a year because his wheelchair was broken. His sister attempted to contact different organizations to get a new wheelchair but she never succeeded. In this period Haji stayed at home and was depressed.

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"The Difference Between Lightning and...
Kabul, Afghanistan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
23 Oct 2013

Portrait of Norya inside the Dasht-e-barchi sub office of the Community Center for the Disabled (CCD), an Afghan NGO, in Kabul. Norea is an inspiring table tennis player who won first prize in a national competition where she was also awarded a trophy for her force of character. She is a member of the National Afghan Paralympics team. When CCD first met with Norya she was very shy because of her disability. After receiving counselling, CCD sent her to a private school where she discovered table tennis. Norya trained very hard and was selected to go to the London Paralympics in 2012, however she didn’t go because her family wouldn’t allow her to participate.

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Disability is not an obstacle
iraq
By Ali Rafaa
28 Aug 2013

Video about : One of Iraq's children suffer from physical disabilities overcome through excellence in School.

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First Disabled Man To Climb St. Cathe...
Cairo, Egypt
By zeer news
11 May 2013

Mazen, the first disabled person to climb St Catherine mountain in Sinai, promoting rights for disabled in Egypt

Background:

Mazen is the first disabled person to climb Mount Saint Catherine in Sinai, to promote rights for the handicapped in Egypt. Mazen contracted polio when he was 3 years old, while he was escaping Iraq with his family during the First Gulf War.

According to World Health Organization’s statistics, 10% of Egypt’s total population suffers from physical or mental disabilities. The 1975 Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons law didn't bring progress to the living conditions of the disabled. During the two years that followed the revolution, with 18 months of military rule followed by the Muslim Brotherhood’s government, Egypt’s handicapped population, estimated at over 8 million, continue to face more of the same problems. The precarious and difficult situation in a city like Cairo, one of the most chaotic in the world due to a substantial lack of infrastructure, is unfortunately only one of the many problems handicapped people face in Egypt. A lack of rights, health care and increased social marginalization inspired Mazen, who has been handicapped since the age of 3, to get involved in political activism, prompting him to join the 6th of April movement in 2010.

In November 2012, during the Mohamed Mahmoud clashes, Mazen lost his close friend and companion of the 6th of April movement, Gika. Since then, he decided to change his methods of protest, and to start a more responsible and peaceful activism campaign through symbolic actions.

Three months ago, he completed the first of several actions, climbing the Keops pyramid in Giza. On the 6th of April 2013, for the anniversary of the movement, he decided to climb the 1586 m and 750 stairs of mount Saint Catherine in Sinai.

Shots:
00:00 - 00: 44 sec intro VO

Mazen is the first disabled person to climb mount Sinai, promoting rights for handicapped people in Egypt.

According to World Health Organization, 10% of Egypt’s population, over 8 million people suffer from a disability. The Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons law of 1975 didn't improve their living conditions. In Egypt little attention is paid to the difficulties of the handicapped, especially in Cairo, one of the most chaotic cities in the world, there is a shortage of infrastructure to the assist their mobility. This is compounded by the lack of rights, poor health care and social marginalization. Mazen, handicapped since the age of 3, was inspired to get involved in political activism, before the revolution.

00:44 – 01:39 interview : presentation and problems of handicapped people in Egypt

“I am Mazen Hamza, I am 26 years old. I was born in 1987 in Iraq. I came in Egypt during the First Gulf War. I contracted the polio when I was three years old because of the vaccination. ”

“The problems that handicapped people suffer here in Egypt have been the reason why I decided to enter political activism, in order to send a message to the entire world, that handicapped people have to be integrated into society. We have problems in all aspects, in transportation, in education, in work, in housing, in airplanes, and mostly in the treatment we received by the government. I mean the government does not know how to treat handicapped people.”

01:40 – 02:03 political activism VO 6th of April / sit-in of 6th of April in front of the Ministry of Interior

Mazen became a political activist in February 2011 when he joined the 6th of April movement, the most active civil rights movements in Egypt. He first participated in debates, demonstrations and sit-ins.

In November 2012, during the clash with Security Forces and the Military Government, Mazen lost his close friend Gika, a fellow activist. This inspired him to begin a campaign of peaceful activism through symbolic demonstrations.

02:04- 02:47 Interview talk about gika / inside Gika's family house

“The death of Gika influenced us a lot. He was a boy that put a beautiful energy within us. Climbing the Cheope Pyramid has been only the beginning of many activities in urban, historical and religious places. We started by climbing the pyramid and it has had a lot of success, we heard good feedback from the people. I am not speaking about the public’s opinion, but from the other activists.”

02:48- 03:18 VO actions: Saint Catherine

Three months ago, Mazen completed the first of his demonstrations, climbing the Haram Cheope, the great pyramid of Giza. Then, on April 6, for the seventh anniversary of the movement, he climbed the 1586 m of Mount Sinai including the 750 “stairs of penitence”. In the Christian, Muslim and Jewish traditions, Mount Sinai is where Moses received the Ten Commandments. Overcoming his physical limitations, Mazen reached the summit in order to raise awareness for the disabled population and to remember those who died for human rights in Egypt.

03:18- 05:12 climbing St Cathrine, reaching the summit

05:12- 05: 27 interview St. Cathrine

“I would like the world to be aware of what’s going on in Egypt. For this reason I climbed St Catherine mountain, where Moses spoke with his God, to bring his speech all around the world, and I am doing the same thing to make people care about the handicapped women, children, and society and in general human rights.”

05: 28 Mazen Screaming the name of “Gika”.

Other text (Arabic translation):

“When I found out that there were young people ready for revolution, I joined them for months to take down the regime, and change the system. After two years I feel that nothing has changed. We have a new president, but the same system, so I tried to be different.

I started to work with the movement by participating in demonstrations and other activities. When I found out about the 6th of April movement, I joined it immediately. I joined the movement on the anniversary of the clashes of Mohammed Mahmud. In the Moquattam group, I was just an activist, but after I became responsible for social policies. I joined many events, especially for handicapped people’s rights.”

I attend a lot of conference to spread their voices everywhere, and to raise awareness of the problems of disabled people.
I tried to see the system separately from religious or historic dogma. I would like the world to be aware of what’s going on in Egypt. For this reason I climbed St Catherine mountain, where Moses spoke with his God, to bring his speech all around the world. And I am doing the same thing to make people care about the handicapped, women, children, and society and in general human rights,

We have a problem with the system. Politicians don’t listen to our demands, but we will make them listen and change their policies to how young people want them.

I am a citizen who sees that people will soon organize themselves to bring a real change. Tomorrow will be better, but now we still need to spend a lot of energy, even if we already spent a lot. That’s why we are climbing St. Catherine mountain, we already climbed 2350 meters and we only have to climb 750 stairs. That is the fight with myself against the system and the entire world, and I will do more, or my efforts will be vane.

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Editor's Picks 21 August 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
20 Aug 2012

A look at Eid Al Fitr celebrations in Egypt, including the release of 638 prisoners from Egyptian prisons, as directed by presidential decree.

After the death of a 16 year old boy in Bahrain, local people and the boy's loved ones take to the streets in protest of human rights abuses and harsh treatment by Bahraini security forces.

A sample from a black & white photo essay of survivors of land mine detonations in Cambodia; despite a disproportionately large number of the population affected by land lines, many receive prostheses and a chance at life.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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The People of Pingelap (2 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
03 Apr 2008

A colorblind woman and a disabled boy.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.