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Barclays/Unreasonable
San Antonio
By TTM Originals
09 Jan 2018

Travis Green lost both legs from combat wounds while deployed as a Marine in Afghanistan. His injuries left him with little hope of picking back up the life he left at home. He’s a dad to five young girls, an avid martial arts practitioner and enjoys working on his truck and trekking around the wilderness of his land in San Antonio, Texas. “I wondered how I could do simple things again like climb a ladder and get on a roof.” Traditional prosthetics, he hoped, might give him a shot. Instead, he says, “I looked like Robocop. They were good for walking, but not for kneeling. And really heavy. Not good for getting under a truck or moving across different terrain.” He put his mechanical skills to work as his own test subject. In his own garage, he invented an early prototype of Stump Armour, a multipurpose foot design. It locks into his knee socket and gives him enough traction to move across pavement or a roof. He can even roll around when performing close to the ground activities like tinkering under his truck. This mobility allows him to perform a myriad of tasks he can’t do in traditional prosthetics. As a participant in the 100 Entrepreneurs Project and the Entrepreneurial Bootcamp for Veterans (EBV), he started a business to show other amputees that an active, outdoor lifestyle is attainable. Along the way, he met Samantha Snabes, NASA scientist and co-founder of re:3D. She invented a mid-sized 3D printer geared towards individuals and community businesses. Last winter, she kickstarted his business by printing a batch for his local veteran hospital. Since then, he’s honed the design and is hard at work training other veterans how to reclaim movement using Stump Armour. More than 1,300 American service members suffer from amputation due to injuries sus-tained while fighting in Afghanistan or Iraq. In addition to American veterans, Stump Ar-mour’s mission is to make devices as affordable as possible worldwide. “I want to em-power other amputees like myself to be more independent with certain tasks and to open more work options. An amputee in my position in a developing country often do not have many options for work to earn a living. With Stump Armour and future projects along the same concept, some amputees may have more fulfilling lives.”

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Stump Armor: Barclays/Unreasonable (L...
San Antonio
By TTM Originals
14 Apr 2017

Travis Green lost both legs from combat wounds while deployed as a Marine in Afghanistan. His injuries left him with little hope of picking back up the life he left at home. He’s a dad to five young girls, an avid martial arts practitioner and enjoys working on his truck and trekking around the wilderness of his land in San Antonio, Texas. “I wondered how I could do simple things again like climb a ladder and get on a roof.” Traditional prosthetics, he hoped, might give him a shot. Instead, he says, “I looked like Robocop. They were good for walking, but not for kneeling. And really heavy. Not good for getting under a truck or moving across different terrain.”

He put his mechanical skills to work as his own test subject. In his own garage, he invented an early prototype of Stump Armour, a multipurpose foot design. It locks into his knee socket and gives him enough traction to move across pavement or a roof. He can even roll around when performing close to the ground activities like tinkering under his truck. This mobility allows him to perform a myriad of tasks he can’t do in traditional prosthetics.

As a participant in the 100 Entrepreneurs Project and the Entrepreneurial Bootcamp for Veterans (EBV), he started a business to show other amputees that an active, outdoor lifestyle is attainable. Along the way, he met Samantha Snabes, NASA scientist and co-founder of re:3D. She invented a mid-sized 3D printer geared towards individuals and community businesses. Last winter, she kickstarted his business by printing a batch for his local veteran hospital. Since then, he’s honed the design and is hard at work training other veterans how to reclaim movement using Stump Armour.

More than 1,300 American service members suffer from amputation due to injuries sus-tained while fighting in Afghanistan or Iraq. In addition to American veterans, Stump Ar-mour’s mission is to make devices as affordable as possible worldwide. “I want to em-power other amputees like myself to be more independent with certain tasks and to open more work options. An amputee in my position in a developing country often do not have many options for work to earn a living. With Stump Armour and future projects along the same concept, some amputees may have more fulfilling lives.”

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A Dying Army, A Dying Clinic, and a D...
Reyhanli
By adrian
17 Mar 2014

In the Turkish border town of Rehyanli, sometimes dubbed the “rebel resort”, the injured and exhausted remnants of the once powerful Free Syrian Army seek medical treatment in a Syrian run clinic that itself is barely surviving.

Established by a defected Syrian Army medic, the clinic hosts both Syrian refugees and fighters injured in the war with a focus on long term rehabilitation. Amongst the patients is a young FSA fighter named Abu Djud. Abu Djud was an archaeology student from Aleppo who took up arms after the uprising began and was injured by shrapnel. He was evacuated to Dr. Rahhal’s clinic and had his leg amputated. He is now passing time in Reyhanli, waiting for his stump to heal and to buy a sports grade prosthetic leg. This story profiles the injured FSA fighters seeking treatment in Dr. Rahhal’s clinic. The stories of the once optimistic and now battered and sidelined young revolutionaries will reflect the withering of the Free Syrian Army in the face of growing radical opposition groups and an emboldened Syrian Army.

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Syrian Limb Center 1
Reyhanli, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Nov 2013

A worker and two patients at the clinic pray early in the afternoon.

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LANDMINES AND CHILDREN
QUITO, Angola, Kosovo, The African bush
By serengeti1 serengeti1
05 May 2013

There is one landmine for every 17 children in the world, says UNICEF. This means one landmine for every 52 people in more than 70 countries. This is a link to a riveting story: it's about things that go boom! and children without legs.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

A patient grasps the handrails as he tries out his new prosthetic limb.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung go's through the first process of sizing and making a prosthetic limb.Mr Soung Sophat triggered a landmine in 1981. Kampong Chhnang province was one of the most heavily mined areas of Cambodia. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung go's through the first process of sizing and making a prosthetic limb.Mr Soung Sophat triggered a landmine in 1981. Kampong Chhnang province was one of the most heavily mined areas of cambodia. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung go's through the first process of sizing and making a prosthetic limb. Mr Soung Sophat triggered a landmine in 1981 and this is now his 10th casting over a 30 year period. Kampong Chhnang province was one of the most heavily mined areas of cambodia. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung go's through the first process of sizing and making a prosthetic limb. Mr Soung Sophat triggered a landmine in 1981 and this is now his 10th casting over a 30 year period. Kampong Chhnang province was one of the most heavily mined areas of Cambodia. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung wraps the patients stub ready for casting. Mr Soung Sophat triggered a landmine in 1981 and this is now his 10th casting over a 30 year period. Kampong Chhnang province was one of the most heavily mined areas of Cambodia. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung go's through the final stages of casting a landmine survivors new prosthetic limb. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung go's through the final stages of casting a landmine survivors new prosthetic limb. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Nurse Ms Tech Aundoung shows the finished cast, the cast will now be sent into the prosthetics workshop where the technicians will finish the process. Ms Tech Aundoung is relocating to Myanmar soon to help deal with the growing numbers of victims affected there during the recent conflicts.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Cambodia Trust Prosthetics technicians at various stages of work creating new arms and legs. Last year Cambodia Trust clinics in Cambodia fitted over 600 limbs, enabling there patients to have mobility again.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

A Prosthetics technician at one of the various stages of work, fixing the outer skin of rubber to the soon to be new left leg.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Prosthetics technician team leader Mr Men Tharro pasting the outer skin of rubber with a kind of high strength glue.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Prosthetics technicians at various stages of work creating new limbs.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

10 year old amputee Pat Roty lost his leg 3 years ago whilst playing close to his home. Landmines in rural areas of Cambodia are still a major problem, and unfortunately a large percentage of the victims are children.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Prosthetics technician team leader Mr Men Tharro using a industrial sander to put the finishing touches to a clients new limb.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Mr Men Tharro cuts the rubber outer skin of the prosthetic, he will then glue it to the main body and remove the excess material.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Prosthetics technicians at various stages of work creating new limbs.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Sisters Don Sochea and Houn Soklin show there prosthetics supplied by The Cambodian Trust. More than 40% of the villages in Cambodia have a problem with landmines, and sadly young children account for about half of all landmine victims.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Prosthetics technicians at various stages of work creating new limbs.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Bicycle repair man Moun Sen reveals his prosthetic donated to him by The Cambodia trust after he triggered a landmine in his small village in Kampong Chhnang province. Most patients have a replacement limb every 2 to 3 years, he is due for a replacement prosthetic in the in the next 2 months, and has been granted a micro loan enabling him to start a small pig farm and bicycle repair shop.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Prosthetics technician team leader Men Tharro during the process of creating a left leg. He has been making prosthetic limbs for the past 12 years, and has worked at the clinic and workshop in Kampong Chhnang for 6 years.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

A patient of The Cambodia Trust reveals his stump, during a rehabilitation session in a remote village in Kampong Chhnang province. He lost his leg 5 years ago after triggering a landmine whilst farming a patch close to his home.

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The Cambodia Trust Prosthetics and Or...
Kampong Chhnang, Cambodia
By George Nickels
05 Nov 2012

Bicycle repair man Moun Sen reveals his prosthetic donated to him by The Cambodia trust after he triggered a landmine in his small village in Kampong Chhnang province. Most patients have a replacement limb every 2 to 3 years, he is due for a replacement prosthetic in the in the next 2 months, and has been granted a micro loan enabling him to start a small pig farm and bicycle repair shop.

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Wounded but not deterred
Madaba, Jordan
By MattKauffman
31 May 2012

Darraj, wounded fighting the Syrian regime, recuperates in Jordan after he and his family were smuggled over the border by the Free Syrian Army. Despite losing his legs, Darraj wants to get back and continue to fight.

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The Price of Freedom
Madaba, Jordan
By MattKauffman
31 May 2012

Samir Ahmed Darraj, 41, who lost his legs while fighting for the Free Syrian Army, rests on the only bed in the apartment he shares with family of six.