Thumb sm
Darkness for Nepal's Earthquake Survi...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By vincenzo floramo
10 May 2015

On April 25, 2015 a 7.4 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal, killing thousands and leaving the country struggling to recover. Two weeks later, survivors experienced another two major earthquakes, leaving them in an uncertain situation, where nature seemed to decide their fate without warning. The most dramatic times come at night when the city streets and mountain paths are wrapped in darkness. If the earth starts trembling, sleep can betray you. People sleep outside, stay up to maintain security in their neighborhoods or just suffer from insomnia and stay awake out of habit. Today, Nepal is living a nightmare, even during the day, where continuos aftershocks remind people that their home stands on the seismic hot zone where the Indian plate collided with the Eurasian plate - giving birth to the Himalayas.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 18
Kathmandu
By vincenzo floramo
10 May 2015

People left homeless by the earthquake still sleep in the open air in Nepal's capital Kathmandu. More than a half-million tents are needed for the huge numbers of people forced from their homes by Nepal's devastating earthquake.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 15
Kathmandu
By vincenzo floramo
10 May 2015

A building lies in ruin between the ancient Durbar Square quarter of Kathmandu and the tourist area Thamel. The total numbers of foreigners who fell victim to the earthquake are still unknown.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 10
Kathmandu
By vincenzo floramo
09 May 2015

A victim of the earthquake stands outside a tent in the Durbar Square area, the ancient historical city center of Kathmandu. Durbar Square was one of the areas of the capital most damaged in the earthquake.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 11
Kathmandu
By vincenzo floramo
09 May 2015

Groups of citizens in Bhaktapur organize night shifts working as security guards around the city to avoid robberies inside abandoned houses.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 12
Kathmandu
By vincenzo floramo
09 May 2015

A statue of the monkey-god Hanuman stands intact between the ruins of Kasthamandap temple and Durbar square.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 13
Kathmandu
By vincenzo floramo
09 May 2015

Entire areas of the ancient city of Kathmandu remain in danger of collapsing in aftershocks. Many roadblocks are in place to avoid people walking through.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 14
Kathmandu
By vincenzo floramo
09 May 2015

The Nepali army has closed the entry to Durbar square in Kathmandu from 7pm to 6am for security reasons.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 16
Kathmandu
By vincenzo floramo
09 May 2015

A Nepali army officer walks during a nighttime rain storm in Durbar square. As the rainy season is approaching in Nepal, the danger of more landslides and collapsed buildings is increasing.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 17
Kathmandu
By vincenzo floramo
09 May 2015

Displaced people camp right in front Durbar Square. Nepal's Government fired a "warning shot" at landlords, saying any property owner who tried to profit from a devastating quake that left thousands of families homeless would face legal action.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 01
Bhaktapur
By vincenzo floramo
06 May 2015

In Bhaktapur, a portrait remains intact on the wall of a destroyed house after the violent earthquake struck Nepal on April 15th.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 05
Bhaktapur
By vincenzo floramo
06 May 2015

Two drunk friends walk together late at night between the rubble of downtown of Bhaktapur, now mostly destroyed.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 03
Bhaktapur
By vincenzo floramo
05 May 2015

Resident of Bhaktapur hold a candlelight vigil in remembrance of three young friends that died together under the rubble after the earthquake on the 25th of April.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 02
Bhaktapur
By vincenzo floramo
04 May 2015

Earthquake victims warm themselves around a fire amid the ruins of the ancient city of Bhaktapur, Nepal, a UNESCO Wold Heritage Site.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 04
Kathmandu
By vincenzo floramo
04 May 2015

Family members of a deceased person shave their hair following tradition after the body of their relative has been cremated at the Pashupatinath temple in Kathmandu.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 06
Kodari
By vincenzo floramo
30 Apr 2015

Dozens of people sleep in the open air in Kodari on the Tibet Chinese border. Thousands of people have remained blocked for more than a week in the area.

The Araniko Highway connecting Kathmandu and China has been obstructed at various points as result of landslides provoked by the earthquake.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 09
Kodari
By vincenzo floramo
30 Apr 2015

Nepali tourists sleep inside their car in a popular spot in Kodari village near the Chinese border. Truck drivers and families on holiday have been stuck for more than week due to the earthquake.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 07
Bhaktapur
By vincenzo floramo
29 Apr 2015

Groups of citizens in Bhaktapur organize night shifts working as security guards around the city to avoid robberies inside abandoned houses.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 08
Bhaktapur
By vincenzo floramo
29 Apr 2015

A victim of the earthquake sleeps outside on the road as a result of the damage his home suffered in the quake. More than three-quarters of the buildings in Nepal's capital, Kathmandu, are uninhabitable or unsafe.

Thumb sm
Nepalese Darkness 19
Kathmandu
By vincenzo floramo
28 Apr 2015

An earthquake victim stands in front of the fire near her home in Bakhtapur.

Thumb sm
Anti Aircraft Guns Fired at Night Rai...
Sanaa Airport
By assamawy
29 Mar 2015

Saudi-led coalition airstrikes on Sanaa Airport on the night of March 29, 2015. In response anti aircraft weapons with red tracers, were fired at the aircraft from the ground.

Frame 0004
Bomb Explodes in Neighborhood of Hout...
Sanaa
By Dhaifallah Homran
23 Feb 2015

February 23, 2015
Sanaa, Yemen

A bomb went off near a military academy on Monday evening in a neighborhood of Sanaa where many Houhi leaders reside.

The blast did not cause any casualties or injuries and is currently being investigated by the Yemeni authorities.

No group has claimed responsibility yet but al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) has taken responsibility for previous attacks against Houthis who they regard as apostates.

Frame 0004
Nightlife Is Back in Baghdad
Baghdad
By Mazin Munther Jawad
08 Feb 2015

Baghdad, Iraq

February 8, 2014

A night curfew that was imposed on Baghdad for 10 years was lifted on Sunday, February 8, allowing people to take to the street and celebrate.
Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar al-Abbadi ordered the end of the curfew that was usually enforced between midnight and 5 am. Security checkpoints were also removed, which allowed people to circulate more easily.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT
Various of cars driving at night
Various of fountain in main square
Wide of traffic policeman
Various of cars driving by
Various of people sitting in street café

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ali Nashmi, Iraqi Historian
04:45 – 05:21
“Baghdad has witnessed a night curfew for many years. It was important because bombings used to take place during gatherings and rush hours. The lack of heavy traffic during the night did not mean that there would be no bombings. Some military positions were targeted. Lifting the curfew means that a heavy burden is lifted off citizens’ shoulders, especially the ill and those who returned from abroad. I think it was a right decision that gives moral and political support to the people, who have been suffering for more than 10 years.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ahmad Ali, Resident of Baghdad
05:22 – 05:43
“I think that lifting the curfew is a good decision. I can see that activity in Baghdad is normal. Those who are sick or traveling can go out at any time during the night. Traffic is normal at this time of the night.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Anas Abdel Rahim, Resident of Baghdad
05:44 – 06:06
“This is something positive, especially for employees, who are tired and want to have some recreation at night. The curfew is over. As you can see, we went out on the first day of lifting the curfew. This is something positive. We wish that Baghdad returns to its previous state.”

Various/ Traveling of street from inside a car

Thumb sm
Un Recorrido por el Nueva York de La ...
New York, USA
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Dec 2014

UN RECORRIDO POR EL NUEVA YORK DE LA LEY SECA

Estos son los auténticos ‘Speakeasy’: “Había muchas formas de esconder el alcohol cuando venía la pasma”

Si fuese el escenario de un libro de Gay Talase empezaría con un portero que no vio nada y terminaría con un disparo; o viceversa. Es el 102 de Norfolk Street, una calle oscura y solitaria en el Lower East Side de Nueva York. Los obreros que construyeron Manhattan dormían en estas casas.

Una valla metálica desgastada por los bordes resguarda lo que parece la entrada a un sótano. Pasan unos minutos. Nadie transita por la calle. Tampoco se escucha música o ruido, más allá de las tripas de la ciudad que gruñen bajo la alcantarilla y algún coche con prisa en la perpendicular, la calle Delancy junto al puente Manhattan. Hace no tanto, en esta zona, “si querías árboles, ibas al parque”, escribe Nina Howes, en el libro ‘Historias orales del Lower East side’. ¿Nos hemos equivocado de lugar?

Cuando el reloj marca las 9 de la noche, aparecen dos chicas de piernas largas y falda corta, que lucen impecables. Separan la valla con determinación, como si no fuese la primera vez que lo hacen, y acceden al agujero. Descienden por un pasadizo lúgubre que conduce a otra entrada de lo que igual podría ser un trastero que cualquier negocio turbio. Sigue sin escucharse ni un ruido. Las de la minifalda llaman a la puerta y alguien abre y vuelve a cerrar. Un portero sentado en un taburete mira a los recién llegados de arriba abajo, con la puerta entreabierta.

--Hola, hemos quedado con Pete.

--Soy yo, pasad, pasad –responde.

Solo falta "Nucky" Thompson para trasladarse a la serie de HBO “Boardwalk Empire”: sofás de terciopelo granate, pinturas de mujeres desnudas sobre paredes enteladas,  alfombras orientales, chimenea, suelos de madera y mucha niña mona. La banda sonora la pone un grupo de jazz con traje y sombrero de la época.

El garito de Lucky Luciano

Es el pub "The Back Room”, uno de los dos únicos auténticos ‘speakeasy’ –como se conoce a los bares clandestinos de la Era de la Ley Seca— que sobreviven en Nueva York”, presume Pete. Dice que muchos detalles de entonces se han conservado, “no solo la entrada”. En la barra, un grupo de turistas bebe cócteles de vodka en tazones que más bien podrían ser de cola-cao. “Había muchas formas de esconder el alcohol cuando venía la pasma”, apunta divertido.

La conocida como “Ley Seca”, que prohibió la venta, importación y fabricación de bebidas alcohólicas en todo el territorio norteamericano, fue establecida por la Enmienda XVIII de la Constitución en 1920 y derogada por la Enmienda XXI, en diciembre de 1933. Trece años de aparente “sequía” en las calles que dio alas a la imaginación de los granujas en los locos años 20.

Como los chicos de “The Back Room” –literalmente “la habitación de atrás”— uno de los muchos locales clandestinos que germinaron en aquella época. Se fundó en 1920 bajo el nombre de "The Back of Ratner’s,” y en él pasaban el rato los “barones de la cerveza”, como los denomina J. Anne Funderburg en su libro sobre la Era de la Prohibición. Uno de los habituales era un joven judío de origen bielorruso, delgaducho, con orejas de soplillo y raya a un lado que se convirtió en el “cerebro financiero” de la mafia y el rey de los casinos de Cuba, ‘Meyer Lansky’. También su compañero del colegio, Lucky Luciano, considerado el padre del “crimen organizado” y un amigo del barrio, Bugsy Siegel, que acabó manejando los bajos fondos de Manhattan.

En una pared del fondo de “The Back Room”, una librería discreta de madera oscura sobresale entre el terciopelo de las paredes. Pete se apoya sobre ella, se abre y aparece “la habitación de atrás”. “Todos los ‘speakeasies’ tenían este tipo de salas ocultas”, explica con una sonrisa. En su interior, otra pared, ahora tabicada, conducía al tejado, “por si había que salir corriendo”, aclara. “Y esta otra te llevaba directamente al sótano y luego a la calle”. Había cuatro formas de escaparse.

La barra que desaparecía en el club 21

Si al ‘Back Room’ asistían los “midas” de los bajos fondos, “en el Club 21 se reunían la ‘crème de la crème” de la farándula, asegura Avery Fletcher, directora del Marketing del local. Su entrada, a diferencia del anterior, no aspira a disimular. Está presidida por

enormes esculturas de jinetes a caballo y un veterano portero, Shaker, que lleva 36 años custodiando la misma puerta. Algunos ‘speakeasies’ blindaban la entrada tradicional con una palabra secreta que solo conocían sus clientes. Hoy es un restaurante de lujo, que recibe a muchas de las mismas caras, “algunas de los más ricas del mundo; también españoles”, presume Shaker, que dice que “por aquí han venido mucho los Fierro”, “los Rockefeller de España”, puntualiza.

El Club 21 lo fundaron dos primos, Jack Kreindler y Charlie Berns, con pocas pretensiones en un principio. “En 1922 habían abierto un local clandestino en el Greenwich Village, llamado “Red Head” –hoy un bar de tapas español (“Tertulia”), entre W4 y la sexta avenida— solo para sacarse un dinero y pagar sus estudios”, asevera Avery Fletcher. “Se mudaron varias veces hasta acabar en el 21 W de la calle 52”, continúa. Lo llamaron: Club 21 por el número de la calle.

“Gracias a la buena relación con la policía”, reconoce Fletcher, “todo marchaba”. Con fiestas a lo “Gran Gatsby”, con “la misma gente, o al menos, la misma clase de gente”, “la misma profusión de champaña, el mismo alboroto abigarrado y multitonal”, que describió Fitzgerald. Fue así “hasta que vetaron la entrada a un columnista cotilla, Walter Winchell, y se vengó en el ‘Daily Mirror’. La broma les costó a los primos contratar a un arquitecto, Frank Buchanan, e instalar un ingenioso sistema para ocultar el alcohol “e incluso hacerlo desaparecer”. Fletcher explica cómo lo hacían: “Empujaban una palanca y los estantes llenos de botellas de la barra caían a una rampa que conducía al alcantarillado”. “Era muy sofisticado para la época”, agrega.

La barra que desaparecía ya no está pero sí la bodega y su robusta puerta de dos palmos de ancho que solo se abría al introducir un metal en una ranura determinada. Se dirige a ella. El interior del restaurante es como uno se imagina “El museo de la Inocencia” de Pamuk pero con glamour, con todo tipo de juguetitos que cuelgan del techo. “Jack era un gran coleccionista”, apunta. Atraviesa la cocina y se detiene sobre las escaleras: “Se dice que Hemingway, que lío más de una en este bar, se vino hasta aquí con una guapa morena que había conocido en el local e hicieron más de una cosa en estos escalones. Al día siguiente supo que era la novia del mafioso Jack ‘Piernas’ Diamond y no le hizo tanta gracia”, presume de leyenda. Lo que realmente es un museo es la bodega. Entre las más de 2.000 botellas del local, algunas aún conservan los nombres de su prestigiosa clientela: “Frank Sinatra”, “Richard Nixon” o “Presidente Ford” se lee en las etiquetas desgastadas sobre el vidrio.

El bar secreto de la estación

Estos dos bares son de los pocos testimonios que sobreviven intactos de la época dorada de la Prohibición. Otro de los Speakeasy famoso de la época, el “Bills Gay Nineties” cerró sus puertas. Pero la herencia coctelera de la época no acaba ahí. No muchos de los 21 millones de viajeros que cada año pasan por la estación de tren más grande del mundo, Grand Central, saben de la existencia de su bar secreto: el ‘Campell Apartment’. Se encuentra en la esquina de la monumental estación, a media vuelta con Vanderbilt Avenue. No fue un speakeasy como tal sino la espectacular sala con un techo de 7, 5 metros de altura que el magnate John W. Campbell alquiló como oficina y demás usos. Una oda a la ostentación con una enorme chimenea señorial de piedra, vidrieras, un piano de cola y una alfombra persa que dicen le costó 300.000 dólares en 1924 (unos 3 o 4 millones ahora).

Algunos cócteles también deben su receta a los apuros de la época. F. Scott Fitzgerald era un apasionado del “Gin Rickey”, un combinado de ginebra, lima y soda, que cuando apareció en el siglo XIX se preparaba con Bourbon, pero que durante la Prohibición empezó a servirse con ginebra, que no requería envejecimiento. Y dos clásicos del momento fueron el “Sidecar”, a base de hielo, brandy, Cointreau, zumo y corteza de limón y el “Manhattan”, con whisky o bourbon, Martini rosso, angostura, una guinda roja y piel de naranja.

Un cóctel a escondidas

“Nos interesa el límite peligroso de las cosas. El ladrón honesto, el asesino sensible. El ateo supersticioso”, escribió Robert Browning. En la actualidad, decenas de locales, aparentemente clandestinos, en Nueva York, recrean aquella época, en una especie de competición por preparar el mejor cóctel, en el mejor escondite. Aunque no lo fueron, parecen auténticos “Speakeasy”, como el “Apotheke”, ubicado en el 9 de Doyers, la que se conocía como “esquina sangrienta”, en China Town y su vecino “Pulquería”, un caprichoso restaurante mexicano camuflado entre carnicerías, tiendas de bolsos de imitación y restaurantes asiáticos; el “Please Don’t Tell”, entre la calle 113 y la plaza de San Marcos, al que se accede por una vieja cabina de teléfonos dentro de una tienda de perritos calientes; el “Raines Law Room”, en la calle West 17, entre la quinta y la sexta avenida, que aparece tras unas escaleras subterráneas y una puerta, a la que hay que llamar para entrar; el “Bathtub Gin”, en el 32 de la novena avenida, su nombre hace referencia al alcohol que se fabricaba en casa de manera ‘amateur’, generalmente en el baño, de lo que hace gala una enorme bañera de cobre en medio del local; el “Dutch Kills”, en el 27-24 de la avenida Jackson, en Long Island City, inimaginable desde el exterior, con su rudimentario cartel de madera en el que solo pone “bar”; el Attaboy, en antiguo “Milk and Honey”, en el 134 de la calle Elderidge, en el Lower East Side, al que para entrar también hay que tocar el timbre; “The Garret”, bajo una cochambrosa escalera en el 296 de la calle Bleecker o el “Blid Barber”, en la calle 10, entre las avenidas A y B, aparentemente una barbería.

En aquella época, “la mayoría de los neoyorquinos, desde los policías hasta las prostitutas, recibían sobornos o estaban buscando lucrarse de alguna manera”, narró Talase en “Honrarás a tu padre”. Y “parte del éxito de la lotería ilegal, que era la fuente de ingresos más lucrativa de la Mafia, era el hecho de ser ilegal.”

Thumb sm
Playing with Fire: Running the 'Corre...
Gerona
By Antolo
23 Oct 2014

It is night and the lights go out, the signal that announces the imminent beginning. In the courtyard, crowded with people, only silhouettes are distinguishable. The atmosphere is charged, but silence reigns. Almost everyone remains motionless except a newcomer trying to find friends in the crowd. Suddenly, a blinding light, followed by cries here, another there, and another... The fire has begun. The drums sound.

The Correfoc, or “fire run,” finds its origins in the “devil dances” of twelfth century Catalonia. The very first one took place at the wedding of Barcelona’s Count, Ramon Berenguer IV. These “devil dances” were performed by actors dressed like demons between meals during noble banquets in the Middle Ages. The dance represented the fight between good and evil.

People start running without a direction in mind. They are running away from the fire, pushing, pulling, eventually becoming attracted by that mysterious magnetism that has always existed between man and the pyrrhic element. At once, men dressed as devils carrying flares mix in the crowd. They light flares and begin to lash out at anything that moves. The sound of firecrackers and the hiss of sparks flying mix with the din of voices. Drums set the rhythm for the fire procession.

The relative security offered by the open space of the square gives way to narrow alleys where devils and spectators huddle. The bravest hug and jump at the fire porters while the majority, fearful, just keep looking for a way to stay ahead of the flames. It is a frenetic tour through the old town, down narrow streets and through open squares, where troupes of devils dance and throw flames and sparks in all directions. At the end of the route, in a larger square, a great fire festival awaits the crowd. Large flares jump skyward while intrepid jugglers delight the audience with a host of tricks, spitting fire like authentic demons until the last flame is extinguished and silence falls on Gerona.

Correfocs were once popular at different celebrations all around Catalonia. The first modern incarnation of the fire parade,however, took place in 1979 at Barcelona’s festival. This represented a comeback for the custom after many popular traditions were lost during the Franco dictatorship. Today, the Correfoc, like other traditional Catalan customs, is a way to preserve Catalonia’s cultural identity.

Frame 0004
Syrians in Central Damascus Discuss P...
Damascus
By TTM Contributor 4
31 May 2014

May 31, 2014
Damascus, Syria

Video shows night shots of the Souq al-Hamidiyya historic market in the old city of Damascus. Shoppers are asked their opinions on the Syrian Presidential Election.

Speakers:

Ali Hijazi, Coffee Shop Worker:
"Concerning the social situation, it seems normal, the streets are crowded and it is improving rapidly. Shops and cafes are receiving customers, people are out at all times, nine, ten, even after eleven and twelve you can still find people outside. Everything is improving, and now it is summer, so people go out more. Tourism has decreased, but still the situation is improving."

Abu Ibrahim, Visitor from Qamishli:
"I am from Qamishli, I came to Damascus and brought my son to visit a doctor. We have been hearing from biased TV channels that the situation in Damascus at night is scary and there is bombing and shelling. However, here we are and we haven’t seen any of that, the situation is very calm and normal."

Rasha, Resident:
"First of all I want to salute Damascus and our President, and I want to note that all people are happy and out on the streets at night. There is nothing to worry about and I sincerely hope the situation will improve more because there is nothing as amazing as Damascus. May God protect our president."

Waed, Resident:
"Everything is fine, we are outside, it is 9:30 at night now and there is nothing to worry about. If any uncomfortable situation was sensed we wouldn’t have gone out at night."