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A Contemporary Hell: Life Inside a Ba...
Faridpur, Bangladesh
By Miguel Candela
07 Mar 2015

Prostitution in Bangladesh has been legal since the year 2000. However, as Bangladesh is a conservative Muslim country, prostitution carries negative social stigmas. Despite this, severe poverty and economic stagnation have forced women previously employed in other sectors to become prostitutes. Furthermore, many sex workers are underage and child prostitution is rife. Female sex workers are often abused and and always underpaid, earning as little as $0.50 per customer.

However, there is growing awareness among sex workers and they have started to organize themselves in unions. One organization of sex workers is called the “Prostitute Association of Faridfur,” founded in Faridpur district, near the Bangladeshi capital, Dhaka. These associations were formed to establish a “union” among sex workers and protect them from abuse. Despite the face of a unified force in having associations to represent these sex workers, radical Islamic conservatives have openly condemned these women. In 2010, these radicals burned a brothel to the ground. That incident injured two women and left all of the other tenants homeless. 

These photos offer intimate portraits of women who's daily lives consist of abuse and exploitation as they struggle to survive on the fringes of one of the poortest societies on earth. 

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Albinism in Tanzania 03
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
23 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 23, 2014 - Sista Laurentina Bukombe doing a skin check-up during the trimestral meeting. She is a nun graduated in dermatology who is collaborating with Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre and Tulime Association, providing albinos with sunscreen lotion, medical check-ups and proper treatment if needed. In this area there had never been killings, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun.

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Albinism in Tanzania 02
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
21 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 21, 2014 - Alufema mends a carpet. She is one of the persons with albinism of the Kilolo District censed by the Tulime Association. There have never been killings in this area, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun. The census was fundamental in order to be able to help the albinos of the area with sunscreen cream and medical check-ups. The national census does not provide correct and actual data about albinism.

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Albinism in Tanzania 07
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
21 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 21, 2014 - Angela with one of her four children, none of whom have albinism. She is one of the persons with albinism of the Kilolo District censed by Tulime Association. There have never been killings in this area, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun. The census was fundamental in order to be able to help the albinos of the area with sunscreen cream and medical check-up. The national census does not provide correct and actual data about albinism.

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Sacrifice and Salvation: Albinism in ...
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
13 Jul 2014

“I was pretending to be asleep, but I saw them cutting her throat and drinking her blood, and then cutting her arms and legs…” These are the words of Mmindi, recalling the night in December 2008 when her 5-year-old sister, Mariam, was murdered in front of her.

Mariam had albinism. In the inner regions of Sub-Saharian Africa people with albinism have a very hard life. Not only do they need to fight against the cancer-causing rays of the harsh tropical sun, but they must also fight stigma and discrimination. Myths and stigmas about Albinos sometimes have horrific results. For examlpe, in recent years, traditional medicine has furthered the belief that albino body parts have elements with magical powers that give success and fortune. This myth has resulted in brutal killings of albinos with the aim of harvesting their body parts. Mariam was a victim of such an attack.

Another major struggle for albinos is protecting themselves from the sun. Those living in areas with little access to health care also struggle to protect themselves from the sun and treat problems arising from UV exposure. 

From the Lake Victoria region, where killings and discrimination still infringe upon these people's human rights, to the Iringa region tormented with an absence of healthcare, albinos in Tanzania are increasingly at risk as of late. The lack of proper information about albinism, in a country in which 1 out of 2.000 people is albino (in Europe and North America the ratio is 1 out of 20.000), leaves the doors to discrimination wide open. For these people, the Tanzanian government has never been able to guarantee health, education or security. Only through the help of N.G.O.s like Under The Same Sun and Tulime does a bright future seem possible for the albinos.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Albinism in Tanzania 08
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
10 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 10, 2014 - Before a race during sports day in Lake View School, Mwanza, Tanzania. albinos play sports early in the morning to avoid exposure to the hot sun.

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Albinism in Tanzania 01
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Courtyard of Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania. The center was the immediate answer of the government to the killings of albinos that started in 2007 in the lake area. Nowadays around 200 people of all ages are living in this center together.

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Albinism in Tanzania 04
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 05
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 06
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 09
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Masalu, 18 years old is both deaf and mute. She arrived with her two siblings at the Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania, after the last killing of an albino that took place in May 2014. She became pregnant after being raped. The center was the immediate answer by the government to the killings of albinos that started in 2007 in the lake area. Nowadays around 200 people of all ages are living in this center together.

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Albinism in Tanzania 10
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - A child dozes off in Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania. The center is defined as a school, but it hosts 200 people of all ages assisted by two teachers and living in precarious conditions.

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Migrant Workers of Lebanon
By Osie Greenway
10 Feb 2014

This sign at St. George's Yacht Club and Marina, used to only say, "STOP SOLIDERE." But after Rahel Abebe, a migrant worker from Ethiopia, was discriminatorily denied entry to the St. George Yacht Club & Marina, the Anti-Racism filed lawsuit on her behalf. The result, most importantly to her, the sign now reads underneath the large writing, "STOP DISCRIMINATION." She has been in Beirut for nearly 14 years and also has a catering service, on the side of her work in a cafe, cooking Ethiopian food.

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Gayrillas Storm the Stage
Santa Clara
By Conteur d'images
01 Dec 2013

ENGLISH - In Cuba, the transsexual community is persecuted by authorities, but resistance is strong in the city of Santa Clara. Here the arts are serving the cause of social integration at a theatre called El Mejunje.

FRANÇAIS - À Cuba, la communauté transsexuelle est persécutée par les autorités, mais résiste dans un théâtre de la ville de Santa Clara, El Mejunje, qui utilise les arts de la scène comme moyen d’intégration sociale.

ESPANOL - En Cuba, la comunidad transexual está perseguida por las autoridades, pero resiste en un teatro de la ciudad de Santa Clara, El Mejunje, que utiliza las artes escénicas como medio de integración social.

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HIV Carriers in China Face Discrimina...
China
By Morten Luxhøi
18 Nov 2013

Mr. Xiong cannot get hospital treatment. Time and time again, he has tried to get treated, but he has been refused repeatedly by hospital staff, despite the fact that he desperately needs a serious surgery. This is because 31-year-old Mr. Xiong is HIV positive.

Despite the fact that the Chinese government issued a law in 2006 that guaranteed HIV carriers the right to marry, access health-care services and equal work opportunities education, this is often not the case in practice. In one survey taken, nearly half of HIV carriers reported having faced some discrimination related to HIV, and over 12 percent had been refused medical care. Mr. Xiong himself was fired from his job when his boss discovered he was infected. His family rejected him. He started seeking treatment at hospitals, but hit a massive wall of reluctance from hospital staff to treat him as well.

Misinformation about the risk of being infected is rife, even in the medical industry. Mr. Xiong speaks about how once, a hospital employee put on plastic gloves and used a metal object to move a piece of paper he signed his name on.

Through interviews and firsthand footage, a video journalist illuminates the experience of an HIV carrier in China today, even following him to a hospital where a doctor refuses to treat him because of his disease.

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The Three Gems of the Buddha
Myanmar
By Transterra Editor
11 Nov 2013

In August 2012 the rioting began. Fueled by religious extremists and invisible politicians with murky motives, arson spread to every major city in Myanmar.

In the beginning the lynching of three Muslims in the country's most westerly state sparked cycles of revenge attacks between it's two inhabiting ethnic groups, the native Buddhists and the Muslim Rohingya, descendents of immigrant Bangladeshi sherpas working for British colonialists. A dawn-to-dusk curfew was enforced by martial law, the streets desolate with shutters pulled low over the normally bustling markets. Workers stopped turning up for work and at night they defended their villages from creeping arsonists. Acres of downtown turned to blackened wastelands, whole blocks of wooden houses reduced to ash. Possessions and the skeletons of livestock lay amongst the fallen rubble where they were left, and orphanages filled with abandoned children.

Since, targets have widened to include anyone of Muslim faith in Myanmar. In cities like Sittwe, Meikhtila, Mandalay, and Lashio the attacks follow a similar pattern, an individual racist attack, a lynching in response, followed by cycles of revenge attacks from both sides. Houses are burnt, hundreds die, and thousands are left homeless. Muslims being the minority, accounting for only 5% of the country's population, always come off worse. They are no longer allowed to vote, travel, or hold positions within the government services.

Now the military struggles to contain and downplay the violence, President U Thein Sein admits the country's push for democracy is jeopardized, complicating the idea of budding democracy amongst peaceful Buddhists.

In Burmese markets, luminous “969” stickers tell Buddhists where to spend their money. Rows of stalls proudly display the logo; tyre shops, jade booths, hotels, betel carts and pharmacies. But this is not a method of religious inclusion, it's a ploy to keep Muslims out. An aggressive nationalistic movement, of which Buddhist monk Wirathu is figurehead.

Wirathu was released from prison in 2011, after serving seven years for inciting religious violence. He was released under a government amnesty program.

"Muslims are only well behaved when they are weak, "said Wirathu in an interview with the Global Post. "When they become strong, they are like a wolf or a jackal; in large packs they hunt down other animals."

The number 969 is taken from the Buddhist texts, where each number relates to an aspect of the religion - Buddha, Dhamma (teachings), and Sanga (monks) – the Three Gems of Buddhism. But under the peaceful umbrella of promoting trade between Buddhists and protecting their cultural identity, the 969 are segregating faith and commerce, undermining religious relations, and driving a wedge with continued violence. But the movement's roots grow into something much more sinister, the beginnings of genocidal thinking, and right wing nationalism.

Photos by Spike Johnson

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Mr.Handsome 11
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

Contestants are presenting themselves for the jury and spectators at Rastriya Nach Ghar, Kathmandu, Nepal. Several hundred spectators, family, friends and those interested, came to the beauty pageant.

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Mr.Handsome 15
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

All the contestants being presented at Rastriya Nach Ghar.

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Mr.Handsome 16
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

Contestant introducing himself in front of the crowd at the theatre at Rastriya Nach Ghar.

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Mr.Handsome 12
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

Group of contestants leaving the stage while impressing the jury at Rastriya Nach Ghar, Kathmandu, Nepal. The jury consisted of Yuva Raj Chaudhary, Deepa KC and Sneh Rana.

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Mr.Handsome 13
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

Group is lining up topless letting the crowd and jury see them at Rastriya Nach Ghar.

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Mr.Handsome 10
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

Passionate dancers accompanied by loud and fast music at Rastriya Nach Ghar.

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Mr.Handsome 9
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

A group of dancers entertain at Rastriya Nach Ghar.

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Mr.Handsome 6
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

The entertainers finishing their set with passion at Rastriya Nach Ghar.

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Mr.Handsome 1
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

Pre-competition entertainer dancing for the audience at Rastriya Nach Ghar.

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Mr.Handsome 7
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

A varied group of spectators watched the beauty pageant including family and friends of the contestants at Rastriya Nach Ghar.

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Dancer
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

Pre-competition dancer sings along and dances at Rastriya Nach Ghar.

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Mr. Handsome 17
kathmandu, nepal
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Nov 2013

The topless contestant leaves the stage at the theatre at Rastriya Nach Ghar, Kathmandu, Nepal.

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Mr. Handsome Competition 2013
Kathmandu
By Transterra Editor
02 Nov 2013

First gay males' Mr. Handsome competition in Nepal
The contestants are coming out, one at a time, wearing only jeans, neckties and cowboy hats. Some are a little stiff. Clearly nervous. But they have a reason to be nervous: They are participating in the first gay beauty pageant: Mr. Handsome, the first of its kind in Nepal. Some are coming out to families and friends by participating here. As the minutes pass, the participants become more and more confident, like they have been out their whole life and have performed many times. They show their moves, facing hundreds of spectators, parents and well-wishers, and they smile.

Homosexuality has been legal in Nepal since 2008, which is one of the most liberal Asian countries, but contestant tell stories of being abused and thrown in jail. In Nepal, homosexuality is often seen as a product of reincarnation and thereby a punishment for poor choices in a former life and same-sex marriage is seen as an import from Western and European culture.

The Mr. Handsome pageant was hosted by the Blue Diamond Society (BDS), Nepalese NGO focusing on LGBT awareness activities, as a way to fight discrimination across the country on the 2 of November 2013. The NGO asked for contestants through its 40-something offices and was ecstatic when they received 35 entry applications. They had expected none.

Prim Pakrim, 22 is one of the contestants, is from Kathmandu. When asked why he's decided to attend the pageant he said “because I’m gay and I'm happy being gay." His family is aware that he is gay but he thinks a beauty pageant like Mr. Handsome can change people's views on gay people and will hopefully end the discrimination gays are facing in the country.

Anup Shrestha, one of the runner ups, from Chitwan, is extremely happy for his prize. He is coming out as being gay by being a part of this competition. He said: “We are intelligent, and we are happy to be gay," and added “There are hundreds of people like us living in Nepal. It´s a wonderful life and we can´t hide it any more” He is now ready to face his family and all the questions that come along with his coming out.

On the stage the contestants are asked what they would say to a headmaster who, as many is currently doing in Nepal, is refusing gays access education. Biswo Raj Adhikari answered, “Every gay and lesbian should have equal rights to education. They should not be isolated or discriminated for their natural identity because being gay or lesbian is not a disease but a feeling.”

Sunil Babu Pant, BDS president, said: "This programme has encouraged gay men to reveal their hidden talents and will create more awareness about gender and sexuality” and added "Although treatment of gays has improved in recent years, many are still not willing to come out openly.” Sunil hopes the competition will become an annual event.

The country’s new constitution is expected to define marriage as a union between two adults, regardless of gender, and to outlaw discrimination based on sexual orientation.

Photos and Text by Ulrik Pedersen

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LGBT Community in Myanmar 6
Mandalay,Myanmar
By vincenzo floramo
26 Jul 2013

Harry in a popular snack bar in Mandaly with her friends. She believes that lesbians are slightly less discriminated against in Burma because many people believe that “tomboys” will be men, regarded as superior to women in their next reincarnation. After the bitter and recent end of her first relationship with another girl, she maintains her dream of founding a family with another woman.

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LGBT Community in Myanmar 20
Mandalay, Myanmar
By vincenzo floramo
21 Jul 2013

TJ walks in Mandalay downtown streets. He discovered his sexuality three years ago, before that he had a relationships with a girl from his village. “It didn't’t work, relationships with women are too complicated.”

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Profiles of the LGBT Community in Mya...
Myanmar
By vincenzo floramo
01 Jul 2013

The following are profiles of the LGBT community in Myanmar.

Photos can be viewed here:http://transterramedia.com/collections/1666

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LGBT Community in Myanmar 13
Yangon,myanmar
By vincenzo floramo
25 Dec 2012

Pauk Pauk combing the hair of a model who wears one of her designs in Rangoon.

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LGBT Community in Myanmar 12
Yangon,myanmar
By vincenzo floramo
19 Dec 2012

Pauk Pauk, at her house in Yangon speaking to a customer by the phone. She still remembers her great experience in Milan. It was tough at the beginning to adapt to a new culture alien to hers but immensely rewarding at the end.

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LGBT Community in Myanmar 11
Yangon,myanmar
By vincenzo floramo
15 Dec 2012

Pauk Pauk working at her atelier near the bank of Yangon river. In her life, she has suffered from insults for being different. She had constant threat of sexual harassment, incomprehension, and love disillusions. Currently she is in a relationship with an actor from Rangoon who accepts her as she is: “I’ve always felt like a woman, a Myanmar woman who has never sought easy sex, but rather a relationship of love.”

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Mr. Abdel Galil Khalil At Al Wefaq Pr...
Manama, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
16 Aug 2012

16 August 2012
Al Wefaq National Islamic Society held a press conference on August 16, 2012 at Al Wefaq's residence in western Manama, where Mr. Abdel Galil Khalil, the head of Al Wefaq who resigned from the Bahraini parliament, spoke about discrimination in Bahrain and the marginalization of certain groups of Bahraini civilians since the start of the revolution on February 10, 2011.

Frame 0004
Mr. Abdel Galil Khalil At Al Wefaq Pr...
Manama, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
16 Aug 2012

16 August 2012
Al Wefaq National Islamic Society held a press conference on August 16, 2012 at Al Wefaq's residence in western Manama, where Mr. Abdel Galil Khalil, the head of Al Wefaq who resigned from the Bahraini parliament, spoke about discrimination in Bahrain and the marginalization of certain groups of Bahraini civilians since the start of the revolution on February 10, 2011.