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Nepal portfolio final 20
Kathmandu
By Taylor Weidman
30 Apr 2015

Nepali soldiers and civilians try to pull down a dangerous section of severely damaged wall that is in danger of collapsing in Bhaktapur, Nepal on April 30, 2015. On April 25, 2015, Nepal suffered a magnitude 7.8 earthquake killing over 5,000 people and injuring thousands more.

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IDEX (International Defence Exhibitio...
Abu Dhabi
By WL
22 Feb 2015

The International Defence Exhibition and Conference (IDEX) held in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates February 22 to 26, 2015.

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Remembering the Vukovar Massacres
Vukovar, Croatia
By danubestory
03 Feb 2015

During the war for the former Yugoslavia, the town of Vukovar was among the most devastated by fighting between Serbian and Croatian forces. Houses bear clear signs of the fierce shelling that took place, and the town’s now bullet hole-ridden water tower rests as a reminder of the siege and the cruel fate that befell the town and its citizens until now. The battle of Vukovar lasted for 87 days, during which many people were stuck in the town, finding refuge in cellars or public bomb shelters that also hosted makeshift hospitals. After entering the city, Serbian troops were alleged to have taken civilians and wounded soldiers from these hospitals into the Ovčara farm where they massacred them.

Today, Vukovar remains a divided town. War crimes committed there remain unsolved and the people who committed them, unpunished. Steve Gaunt, a former Croat mercenary who took part in the fight for Vukovar, now works as a historian and explorer for the local museum. He talks of his experience of the war, of Vukovar's troubled present, and of the struggle for normality faced by people who still live side-by-side with those they used to fight.

On February 4, 2015, the International Court of Justice dismissed claims of genocide committed by Serbia and Croatia during the Yugoslav war, that took hundreds of thousands of lives in the early-1990s. The court cited a lack of evidence that the massacres constituted genocide - a difficult claim to prove because the prosecution must be able to prove the intentions of the perpetrators.

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 01
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

Former Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen here with his 14 year old son Hussein, training in Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 02
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 04
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 05
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 11
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 07
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 08
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, (left) Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 06
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 10
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 09
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

14-year old Hussein (center) and 16-year old Ali (standing, center), son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 14
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 12
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

16-year old Ali, son of Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 13
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Norwegian father and sons fight ISIS 16
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
29 Jan 2015

Iraqi army general Abass al-Assadi, Norwegian citizen, seen training near Kerbala, Iraq on January 29, 2015. Al-Assadi had lived in Norway since 1991, returned to Syria In 2013 with his daughter and two sons, to fight with the Assad regime and Òprotect Shiite shrines.Ó His daughter was killed in an artillery strike. He is now with his two sons engaged in the fight against the "Islamic State".. Photo by Mushtaq Muhammed / Transterra Media

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Ukraine: Zombieland
Donetsk
By Sergey Ponomarev
27 Jan 2015

The war in southeastern Ukraine has turned the region in to a zombie-land. Ukraine has historically been divided into pro-European and pro-Russian regions. Donbass, in the east, has been a battleground since the 2014 revolution in Kiev finally snapped West from East. In this war, propaganda has become the main tool of manipulation, setting some citizens against others. Some locals have become so brainwashed by Russian TV that it appeared they had no opinions of their own, mimicking only what they have heard on TV. They gave their opponents offensive homogenizing nicknames, dehumanizing them so it makes it easier to kill. Youth gangs and armed groups became the main force in the region, seizing administration buildings and setting up checkpoints. Just as they were told on Russian state TV, they believed that a Nazi government, who would soon come to the southeast to kill them, now ruled western Ukraine. At the same time, Ukrainian propaganda was also accusing Donbass of fascism and treachery, using almost same methods to dehumanize separatists. The war in Ukraine has lasted almost a year and ordinary people have been turned into zombies absorbing the flood of propaganda that is designed to continue the war, propagate the criminal laws of the many small warlords on the ground and the hate that was spilled in the air.

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Funeral of a fighter in Hasake
7, Al Hasakah,Syria
By TTM Contributor 33
23 Jan 2015

Atmosphere at funeral of Kurdish YPG fighter Mohamad Turk, held in Hasake, northern Syria on January 23, 2015. Turk was killed the day before in clashes between Kurdish fighters and Syrian pro Assad soldiers.

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Syria Jihadists 01
Suruc
By Maciej Moskwa
19 Nov 2014

Turkey, near Suruc, view on Kobane. Nov 2014. Turkish soldier watching US airstrike against ISIS during siege of Kobane. photo: Maciej Moskwa/TESTIGO

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Syrian Refugees in Turkey 20
kobane
By Ulrik Pedersen
26 Sep 2014

A Syrian female fighter with her child and an AK-47 assault rifle. Across Iraq and Syrian, especially Syrian-Kurdish females are fighting ISIS. Kobane, Syria.

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"We Have Not Forgotten Israel"-Interv...
Beirut
By Levant Desk
17 Sep 2014

September 17, 2014
Southern Suburbs, Beirut, Lebanon

A wounded Hezbollah fighter, fresh from battle against IS in Syria, gives an exclusive interview discussing the state of Hezbollah in Syria, the battle against IS and Nusra, his opinion about the American strikes against IS, and Hezbollah's readiness for a new war with Israel.

The fighter who was recently wounded in battle against IS and Nusra in the Qalamoun mountains describes human wave attacks by IS and Nusra and the military logistics of Hezbollah's fight in Syria.

The fighter's voice has been altered to protect his identity.

Transcript:

00:16-00:20
Q: Can you give us your code name?
A: My name is Hussein.

00:21- 00:36
Q: We know that you were recently on a frontline, and you were injured, and you just returned [home]. If it is not confidential, can you tell us which frontline you were on?
A: In Qalamoun.

00:37-01:00
Q: People hear that there are battles in Qalamoun, but of course as a person on the frontline, you know more. Tell us who you are fighting in Qalamoun. Who is the enemy in Qalamoun?
A: Jabhat Al Nusra, ISIS, of course half of them are foreigners: Saudis, Kuwaitis, Afghanis, Lebanese. It is a mix.

01:01-01:10
Q: Do you have an idea about how many [ISIS/Nusra] fighters there are?
A: There are around 12,000 to 7,000, and they are constantly increasing in number.

01:11-01:19
Q: So there is still an influx [of Nusra/ISIS fighters] from Syria?
A: Yes, the majority are coming from Arsal, even though this [route] is now supposed to have been controlled [by the Lebanese Armed Forces], the influx from Arsal.

01:20-01:50
Q: From your close quarters engagement and fighting with them, how trained are they?
A: They have high capabilities, but their way of attacking, they come in huge numbers. For example, and this is causing us some losses, if we have a position that can withstand the attack of a 100 fighters, you would find 600 fighters attacking us, and this is causing losses for us.

01:51–02:20
Q: And their arms?
A: Like our weapons. Cornets, 23mm guns, 14.5 mm guns, 57mm guns, grad rockets, of course they are using grad rockets. [They use] traditional battle weapons. They have canons, mortars, and rockets. They mostly rely on snipers. When they initiate an attack, they would have around 100 snipers spotting and providing covering fire. So the battles are very hard.

02:21-02:36
Q: Is The Resistance [Hezbollah] getting any military support from the Syrian Army?
A: Some air support, but while fighting [on the ground], there is not supposed to be any Syrian army members.

02:37-03:12
Q: When your group is fighting, are the orders coming from The Resistance or the Syrian army?
A: For The Resistance, the orders 100% from The Resistance. The leadership is from The Resistance. The orders come from the The Resistance’s group commanders. There is a field commander, there is a military commander on the ground, and there is a commander higher than him in the operations room. The Resistance only. Sometimes if we need anything from the Syrian army, we give them the coordinates and they hit the location [from the air].

03:13-03:59
Q: How intertwined are the front lines [between ISIS/Nusra and Hezbollah]?
A: Very intertwined. There can be areas where there is 500m distance between us, sometimes 300m, or 200m. You may get surprised by them in some areas. At times they may not be prepared for us and we launch a surprise attack on them. We do infiltration operations and use explosive charges. And spotting is constant, naturally; we know who we want.

04:00-04:48
Q: What do you remember from the day you were injured?
A: They launched a massive attack on us. Some men with us were martyred, and some were wounded. Then we our backup arrived. When the injury happened, I was still able to fight until the medics came and we fixed the situation. I stayed on the ground for a while until more [Hezbollah] groups came and helped us. Then the medics evacuated us. That is all I remember from the battle, but it was a massive attack. You have to consider they were around 2000 members. This is how they attack, they come in waves and they don’t let you rest. Attack after attack, attack after attack, attack after attack. And they don’t care how many of their men die; those [Nusra/ISIS] fighters who flee the battle get killed [by their commanders] when they return [to their base].

05:00- 05:25
Q: What did you feel when you were wounded? What was the first thought to go through your head? Did you know how serious your injury was? What did you feel?
A: I felt some pain. When I first was wounded, I did not feel anything, but the hit was hot. Then it became harsh. After 15 minutes, I was not able to move properly, so I became still and I said the Shahada [a mantra used to declare one’s faith in Islam]. This [martyrdom/death] is the reason we are coming here.

05:26-05:36
Q: Where were you injured?
A: In my back
Q: Was it mortar shrapnel or a bullet?
A: No, it was an M16 bullet. A sniper.

05:37-05:54
Q: How do you perceive the “Takfiri” [Extremist] enemy in front of you?
A: I perceive him as the enemy of all humanity, and fighting him is a duty.

05:55-06:14
Q: Do you feel that there is a possibility of negotiating with these “Takfiri” groups, or with Free Syrian Army groups, if there are any left?
A: With the Free Syrian Army, maybe at some point. However, with Jabhat Al Nusra, and ISIS in particular, there is no possibility. No possibility at all.

06:15-06:24
Q: Is this a battle until the end?
A: It is a battle until the end and we are with fighting them in Lebanon before they spread.

06:25-06:48
Q: How long are you staying here to rest?
A: For now, I will stay here for no less than 2 months to recover. I cannot go back [to the frontline] before 2 months.

06:49-06:51
Q: Are you excited about going back to the frontline?
A: Naturally.

06:55-07:27
Q: Can you give me an estimated number of The Resistance fighters?
A: The thing with The Resistance is that I cannot give you a number. Each unit knows what it has. For example, I do not know what there is in another unit. In Hezbollah, each team is on its own, each unit on its own. One unit does not know what the other unit has. But I can tell you that we have our weight up [in Syria] and that we have not forgotten Israel.

07:30-08:07
Q: In your opinion, is Hezbollah ready for a two front war?
A: The amount of men fighting [on the Israeli front] has not doubled, but tripled the amount who were fighting in the July War [2006 War with Israel]. They [the fighters on the Israeli front] do not know what is going on in Syria, their job is there [on the Israeli front].

Q: So they [the fighters] are separated?
A: They are separated.
Q: How ready is The Resistance?
A: Since 2006 until now, The Resistance has always been ready and is ready for any war at any time, and on all fronts.

08:08-08:44
Q: Did any of your comrades get martyred while you were near them?
A: Of course
Q: Can you tell us about an incident?
A: A man [Hezbollah fighter] was martyred, and he was telling me, “send my regards to my mother, this is how I was martyred”. I told him not to be afraid and I comforted him, but the bombardment was very heavy. I moved him to another place and we waited with him until the aid came, but he was already martyred. And of course I sent his regards to his mother and I gave her his scarf with his blood.

08:45-9:29
Q: When one of the men with you gets martyred, do you feel that this encourages the rest to fight or does it cause some sort of frustration?
A: Our resolve is always strong for a simple reason. No one hit me on my hand to become a fighter. I feel am threatened here in Lebanon. We are seeing what is happening in Iraq, we saw what happened in Syria. These people have no mercy for anyone. No one is forcing us to go fight. On the contrary, there are many who are told to stay here because there is no need for them to go fight. I can assure you that if the Sayyed [Hassan Nasrallah] calls for a war, we will have 300,000 fighters in a matter of hours.

09:30-10:10
Q: Is there any place where you wish things were better? Logistically or artillery wise, or maybe more orders?
A: We are doing what we are capable of doing. On the contrary, we have the best food, the best weapons, the best training and the best morale. We know who we are fighting. We know that we have no blood on our hands, we are exonerated in this world from that. We have no problems from that aspect and we are very comfortable. The more blood we lose, the stronger we get.

10:11-10:46
Q: We heard recently that an international alliance was born to attack ISIS targets. In your opinion, can we consider Hezbollah and the United States as having an intersection of interests?
A: There is no intersection at all. ISIS is a creation of America. Israel made ISIS to get to where we are now and they were not able to succeed. I think this is another link in the July War [2006 War with Israel] chain, and God willing, we will break it.

10:47-
Q: If there is a message you would like to tell the people listening to you, what message would you like to send?
A: We are victorious, as God is one, and I would like to reassure [our solidarity with] all of humanity and all of its sects. For ISIS, all sects are its enemies, even the Sunni. Anyone who saw what is going on in Iraq, in Mosul, how they are walking the streets, shooting people right and left, without knowing their identity or nationality or to which sect they belong. All they do is kill and destroy, and it is a duty to fight them. We will win and God will make us victorious because we are right.

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"We Don't Cut Throats...We Fight" - I...
Beirut
By Levant Desk
17 Sep 2014

September 17, 2014
Southern Suburbs, Beirut, Lebanon
Interview with Hezbollah Group Commander

A Hezbollah commander, fresh from battle against IS in Syria, gives an exclusive interview discussing the state of Hezbollah in Syria, the battle against IS and Nusra, his opinion about American strikes against IS, and Hezbollah's readiness for a new war with Israel.

The commander discusses details about battlefield issues and difficulties. He also declares that he "hopes for a war to start between the Zionist enemy and Hezbollah soon", and that he has "no problem with the American people," but does have "a problem with American policies."

The commander's voice has been altered to protect his identity.

Q: Can you please introduce yourself? Name or codename
A: In the name of God, the merciful. My name is Jaafar, I am a member of Hezbollah.

Q: Please tell us about the amount of people signing up to fight with Hezbollah?
A: Thank God, volunteers are coming in on a regular basis. It [enrollment] has increased after the war in Syria and the 2006 war. [It increased] Especially after the Syrian war because it is known and in the open now. They [Syrian opposition] want The Resistance’ head, Hezbollah’s head. You are probably seeing the events and measures being taken by media outlets [to fight Hezbollah], or even the nature of movements on the ground are affecting [fighting] Hezbollah. Hezbollah gains strength from the blood of the martyrs. This is a grace from God and we are thankful for that.

Q: In the recent battles, in Arsal and Qalamoun, it is obvious that Hezbollah is taking casualties. How big are these casualties in comparison to those suffered by the ‘Takfiri’ [extremist] groups?
A: Specify what you mean by casualties. Human casualties? There are no human casualties. There are martyrs and wounded people, not casualties. If you are talking about materials losses we might agree with you, but if you are talking about people, we have martyrs and wounded men, not casualties. These people are fueling this cause and this march, our martyrs in who we take pride. Material losses are the casualties that we can agree with you on.

Q: How can we compare martyrs and wounded of Hezbollah to the casualties among the ‘Takfiri’ [extremist] groups?
A: We in Hezbollah do not hide any martyrs and this is not in our traditions. When a Hezbollah fighter is killed, he is buried on the second, third, fourth or first day, depending on the battlefield and the moving of the body, and when his parents wish to bury him in his hometown. Nothing more.

You need to see the other side, they are not organized. Everyone works according to their own thoughts or according to those financing them. As for Jabhat Al Nusra, who are the terrorist group with the biggest presence on the border between us and Syria, I don’t believe that they talk about their casualties.

As for our intelligence and security services, we always give them accurate accounts in names and numbers, if you have noticed, while they [Jabhat al-Nusra], on the other hand, do not announce [their casualties] until a while after they have been killed. This is the difference between them and us.

Q: What is the level of Hezbollah’s readiness at this point in time regarding the danger of a war on both the eastern front [Syria] and southern front [Israel] simultaneously?
A: The Resistance [Hezbollah] against Israel, who are stationed on the southern borders of Lebanon, are entirely concentrated on the Israeli occupier in body, mind, and soul. The
operations of the young men fighting on the eastern Lebanese-Syrian borders is entirely unrelated to the battles with the Israeli enemy, and anyone who thinks otherwise is delusional.

Q: So if we need to know a percentage of readiness?
A: With Israel? More than 100%, and this is the case all of the time. You can even label it as ‘holy’. Regarding the situation in the whole of Lebanon, Hezbollah is completely ready in all areas that Hezbollah has influence. We have nothing to do with areas where Hezbollah hold no influence.

Q: Now that you’ve mentioned this, we have heard news that Hezbollah is helping, either through training or arming, some parties in the Christian border towns. How accurate is that?
A: To be honest with you, I do not have information from Hezbollah about this subject in particular, but I have information from someone close to those (Christian) villages, like Deir El Ahmar and Ras Baalbak. Something like that is going on, so I have not heard this from Hezbollah, but I have heard it from someone close and he has confirmed this to me. This is all I can say

Q: Can you please clarify? What did he confirm? What did he say?
A: He confirmed that Hezbollah is protecting Christians with all possible means. For those who want to defend themselves with their own hands and weapons, Hezbollah is providing them with the means to be ready, which includes arming individuals.

Q: How many Christians are actually signing up for this?
A: I have heard that 90% of [Christian] villages… and the Lebanese Forces [political party] and the Phalange Party are not happy with that because no one is providing them with any support.

Q: In the Qalamoun and Arsal fronts, to be specific, who is Hezbollah fighting against?
A: 83 countries, all of them. Those who were fighting us in Qusair are now fighting us in the outskirts of Arsal, that is the mountainous area outside Arsal. Not inside Arsal, we are present in the mountains defending our land, country and Resistance. We will be where we should be. There are many nationalities: Uzbeks, Chechens, Egyptians, Palestinians, all of the gulf and Arab countries. We have 83 countries operating against us: the Europeans, Americans, British, you name it. God willing we will be victorious.

Q: Since you have mentioned the Americans, we are hearing that American and other airstrikes against ISIS are already underway. Can we say that there is a temporary intersection of interests between Hezbollah and the United States?
A: If I were to answer you about the Americans and their ISIS allies, we would be wasting time. You are a politician and a journalist and you understand these things, so us talking about this would be like us making fools out of each other. They (ISIS and the US) are allies and one team, period.

Q: If we were to give a description of the nature of the struggle now, the Americans are now bombing some ISIS positions and Hezbollah is fighting against ISIS and other groups.
A: When we fought ISIS, Nusra and terrorism everybody stood against us. Now everyone is saying what we were saying, but there is a difference in dealing with it. Hezbollah started two and a half years ago. They should come to us and strike an alliance with us. Isn’t that right? We are way ahead of all of them.

Q: In your opinion are these airstrikes and this alliance a pretext or a prelude to bomb some (Syrian) regime positions in Syria?
A: You need to see what is being prepared internationally. It will not be long. All will be clear in a matter of days. I do not have accurate information about this subject and I am not a political analyst. I can tell you about the nature of the terrain and soldiers. The geography of the battlefield, or what took place in this position or that. However, to talk about something international that I am not familiar with would be beyond me.

Q: Can you please tell us, without revealing any secrets, where is Hezbollah present on the ground in Syria?
A: I can answer about the areas that I was present in. The Sayyida Zeinab shrine [in Damascus], Ghouta [Damascus], Jobar [Damascus], the Damascus suburbs, and the mountains separating Lebanon and Syria. There is a Hezbollah presence in all of these areas. Qusair and the outskirts of Qusair. Aleppo. I have some friends who operate in Aleppo, in an area called Zahra, which has been under siege for three years. I have not heard of, seen, or been to other places.

Q: What is the nature of the frontlines in these places? Can we briefly talk about every front and how intertwined the lines are [with Nusra/ISIS/FSA]? How close is the engagement with the enemy?
A: This depends on the geography and terrain. In some places it’s house-to-house, window-to-window, man-to-man, and on some fronts, no one advances, neither them nor us. In the wider, more open areas, the snipers use 23mm and 57mm guns, not the Dushka or the12.7mm guns [because of the large distances]. Imagine that. The distances are vast. Every terrain has it’s own circumstances, geography and weaponry. There are some mountainous areas with rough terrain that have their own style because you can’t hide from each other at close range. You need to secure a hilltop and fortify it [and advance from] from one hilltop to another or one mountain to another. This is not house-to-house, so the nature of terrain makes a big difference.

Q: Was there a certain front that proved to be more difficult than others?
A: in terms of terrain or combat?
Q: Both
A: The mountains. There are vast distances beyond what the eye can see. This doesn’t offer the same help you get in towns like Qusair. This requires more troops and heavier weapons, aerial bombardment, artillery and tank fire. It has it’s own style and takes more time.

Q: Since you have mentioned aerial bombardment, what is the extent of coordination between Hezbollah and the Syrian army when it comes to military operations?
A: This is up to the leadership of Hezbollah. We have 100% accuracy when it comes to targeting. The targets that we request the Syrian air force to bomb are hit with 100% accuracy. Not 75% or 50% like it used to be before. This has changed after the battle of Qusair. This is what I can help you with. There were mistakes before, I won’t deny it, it happened with a number of groups. However, this stopped after Qusair.

Q: On the ground, in the areas where Hezbollah is present alongside the Syrian army, who has command on these fronts?
A: We do not participate in any attacks alongside the Syrian regime. The Syrian Army handles one front and we handle another. We deal with ours and they deal with theirs. Sometimes, this hasn’t happened to me, the Hezbollah and Syrian Arab Army forces are engaged and intertwined. However, in the fights that I was involved with in Hezbollah, we were in one place and the Syrian Arab Army was in another. Yes there exists coordination, but the lines are not intertwined.

Q: So in this case who is in command?
A: When you [Hezbollah] are on a certain front and they [the Syrian Army] are on another front, the field commander [of each side] has command, but the coordination is present so that we wouldn’t shell each other with artillery.

Q: We heard on Israeli Media that threats were being made against Lebanon and that there were preparations for war. In your opinion, how serious is this? And how will The Resistance [Hezbollah] retaliate? And what is their level of readiness?
A: We in The Resistance do not take the words of the Zionist enemy lightly. We have political and military minds and analysts who observe and analyze, in depth, on the short and long run when it comes to the Zionist enemy. This is due to wise leadership headed by the secretary general Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah.

Q: So you take the threats seriously?
A: We do not neglect anything regarding the Zionists, even if it were a small or big thing. All gets dealt with seriously and meticulously.

Q: Could there be an imminent war on the southern front? [Israeli front]
A: This is what we hope for.

Q: Can you please give me a complete answer because my question will not be aired?
A: This is what Hezbollah hopes for, for a war to start between the Zionist enemy and Hezbollah soon, God willing. This is what we hope for. This is what every member of Hezbollah hopes for.

Q: Can we say that The Resistance is fully ready?
A: Of course, you can say that with the utmost confidence.

Q: Tell us about a certain incident that will allow me to illustrate the influx of volunteers joining Hezbollah’s ranks. Do you recall a certain incident?
A: In what respect? Be more specific.
Q: In terms of influx and people wanting to join.
A: This is an ongoing process in Hezbollah. This [Hezbollah] is a school [of resistance] ever since they [Israelis] occupied our land in south Lebanon and Hezbollah, thanks to God and the young men, is growing in numbers. Hezbollah never deteriorated. For 30 or 32 years, since 1982, Hezbollah is on the rise, and thanks to the almighty God, whoever fights Hezbollah falls, declines and perishes. God willing, and the biggest proof of that is the Israeli withdrawal and the blows that were delivered to the Takfiris [Extremists] in Syria. We are continuing, God willing. This is a universal war against us and we are all-in.

Q: What do you say to some media outlets who are saying that Hezbollah and the Americans are now allies?
A: We are not even remotely concerned with these outlets. We never relied on those media outlets that you are asking about, nor on human rights or the United Nations charter. We do not care about all that. We rely first on God and then ourselves.

Q: So can you tell me if Hezbollah and the Americans are allies?
A: Your question is out of place.
Q: it is out of place because you and I know each other.
A: This is my opinion and my doctrine. This is all I can answer. We do not have a problem with the American people; we have a problem with American policies. Take a look at American policies in the Middle East and the world, from the times of Hiroshima until this day, and you will know if Hezbollah is with it or against it. We will let the viewers decide that.

Q: Is there a certain message that you would like to send to an audience that might be Arabic or western that will be viewing this interview?
A: We rely on people’s intelligence and awareness. [We do not rely on] People who are bought with money or intimidated by force or the media. There are honest people who take to the streets carrying the banners of resistance from Hamas to Hezbollah to the Islamic Jihad. These people and this resistance will never die. These people are there, but their rulers are corrupt. The people are present, just give them some hope of being able to express their opinions freely and they will do just that. They are entirely with us.

Q: There is a question that I forgot to ask at the beginning. Through your engagement with Takfiri [Extremist] groups, what can you say about the level of their training and arming?
A: They are being armed by all countries and their training comes from places as ranging from Turkey to Chechnya, to Iraq, the Balkans and Somalia. All of the areas where Al Qaeda and Wahhabis are active, from Yugoslavia, to Bosnia, and Serbia. Those who have not fought in these places are being trained in Turkey and Jordan, and in Saudi Arabia, according to some information. We are fighting 83 countries and an influx of money and media outlets and weapons and hundreds of thousands of fighters, but it is very well known where the Banner of God and his prophet lay. It lies with the just cause.

Q: Do you, as a person and as a Hezbollah fighter, have any fears that, after the upcoming airstrikes against ISIS, extremist fighters will spillover into Lebanon?
A: God willing, we are waiting for them. They are attacking civilians, children, old people and women.
Our fight with the Takfiris [Extremists] is in the battlefield, not in the different media outlets. We are in the field. If they want to fight Hezbollah, let them leave the civilians out of this and, if they are men as they claim, we are here. Let them come face us. We don’t kidnap or cut throats, we fight. The prisoner we take is a prisoner of war, while they cut throats of prisoners and wounded.

Q: Since you mentioned prisoners, it is no secret that Hezbollah has taken prisoners from these groups.
A: That is possible. I can neither confirm nor deny that. It is possible.
Q: I want to ask you about how you treat the prisoners you take from these groups, if you have taken any prisoners.
A: We follow the rules of the Islamic religion. When we released the Israeli enemy hostages, they themselves talked about how [well] they were treated. So how do you think we will treat those who are neither Jewish nor Zionists? Time will prove that

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Donbass at a crossroad
kiev
By Arturas Morozovas
14 Jul 2014

With the fires of the Maidan protests fading in Kiev, the geopolitical wind, blowing from the North East, has sparked a revolutionary fire in the Ukrainian region of Donbass.

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Donbass at a Crossroad
Luhansk
By Arturas Morozovas
29 Jun 2014

June 29, 2014
Luhansk, Ukraine

Separatists attack Ukrainian army positions at their fortifications near the village of Metalist, 10km from Luhansk.

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Donbass at a Crossroad
Luhansk
By Arturas Morozovas
29 Jun 2014

June 29, 2014
Luhansk, Ukraine

Self proclaimed Russian officer Ivan in the separatists' fortifications near village of Metalist. The badge on Ivan's military uniform says 'Russian Paratrooper Special Corp 45th Regiment'.

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Donbass at a Crossroad
Luhansk
By Arturas Morozovas
29 Jun 2014

June 29, 2014
Luhansk, Ukraine

Self proclaimed Russian officer Ivan in the separatists' fortifications near village of Metalist. The badge on Ivan's military uniform says 'Russian Paratrooper Special Corp 45th Regiment'.

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Donbass at a Crossroad
Luhansk
By Arturas Morozovas
29 Jun 2014

June 29, 2014
Luhansk, Ukraine

Self proclaimed Russian officer Ivan in the separatists' fortifications near village of Metalist. The badge on Ivan's military uniform says 'Russian Paratrooper Special Corp 45th Regiment'.

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Ukraine's Standoff with Russia
By Transterra Editor
05 Mar 2014

An alleged Russian soldier in full body armor and armed with an assault rifle standing in front of the besieged Ukrainian Military Base in Perevalnoye close to Simferopol, Crimea (Ukraine) on March 5th, 2014.

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Church of the Nations
Paris
By Nadia Ferroukhi
11 Feb 2014

A former American GI turned pastor has been in France for more than 10 years, and in that time, managed to cultivate a massive following, with five daughter churches, and more than 50 sister churches created in the last five years around the world. Pastor Lesley Joseph, who had his revelation on the Okinawa military base in Japan, is an unusual and valuable partner for the community, whom he has brought in with what he calls his "spiritual third world," an awakening of love and unity. His churches are diverse, with people coming from all walks of life through his doors to hear his sermons.
The charismatic missionary preaches with simplicity and humor, and focuses on the street impact, touring the city of Paris, appealing to all: the homeless, poor, old, young, gypsies, bourgeois, Africans, Catholics, Christians and Muslims. His success lies with his open-to-all policy, a stark and welcome contrast to other religious institutions.

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Liberated Malakal in South Sudan
South Sudan
By Transterra Editor
22 Jan 2014

In recently liberated Malakal, hospitals, schools and churches have been transformed into refugee camps – housing the displaced, but struggling to provide for the huge number of those seeking safety. Army spokesman Philip Aguer said on Monday that the rebels "were flushed out of the town" and Malakal was "finally in the hands" of South Sudanese troops again. This photo essay follows the troops on a trip to Malakal with the Minister of Defense. Photos by Emre Rende

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 30
Plaza Independencia, Montevideo, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
20 Jan 2014

Jose Gervasio Artigas is considered by many the father of Uruguay. Soldiers still guard his tomb in Montevideo's Plaza Independencia, a tribute to the man who fought to free the country. Artigas' life and victories are portrayed on the walls of the mausoleum alongside images portraying events in Uruguayan history. Today national identity is a historical blend resulting from the struggle to maintain freedom from Spain and later from Argentina and Brazil; gaucho culture; African slave roots; political caudillismo; and European cultural and intellectual models.

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Egyptians remember those killed in Se...
Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
01 Oct 2013

Egyptians gather in Cairo's Tahrir Square to mourn the deaths of 42 people killed last month in demonstrations demanding the generals who took over from Mubarak hand over to civilian rule immediately. Protesters in Tahrir Square said they now saw no difference between the generals and the president they succeeded. Cairo, Egypt. 02/12/2011

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Syria Jihadists 04
Suruc
By Maciej Moskwa
12 Aug 2013

Syria, Idlib province near Maarrat An-Nouman, Feb 2013 Praying fighter in training base near city of Maarrat An Nouman. Fighters gathered there were involved in first siege of Wadi Deif Base. At the time of photographer presence there was at least one djihadist instructor openly claiming that he is there for sake of battle against non belivers, using term "kufar". Photo: Maciej Moskwa/TESTIGO

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A Day in the Emergency Room in Aleppo...
Aleppo
By Simon Letellier
18 Jun 2013

During the armed conflict in Syria, hospitals and their staff are frequently targeted by Bashar Al Assad's regime. The Syrian regime considers aiding rebels in any way an act of terrorism. The revolution has changed the stability throughout the country and now even large hospitals are in need of medical supplies, equipment, and staff.

Doctors and their staff at this makeshift hospital in Aleppo are overwhelmed by the amount of civilians and Free Syrian soldiers wounded by regime airstrikes, snipers, and various types of bombardments. The photographs were taken in the emergency room of a field hospital in Aleppo. Doctors were on standby in the emergency room cleaning medical tools and attending to patients when the bombs began to fall. Near the hospital's location, an airstrike commenced and the wounded begin pouring in.

The first of the injured to make it to the hospital doors was a young girl. She was carried in by an FSA soldier who found her lying next to her deceased mother in the street after the bombs hit. The young girl was covered in blood and peppered with shrapnel, screaming for her mother while her mother's corpse was carried into the hospital.

The soldier explained that the little girl and her mother were walking together when the bomb exploded nearby, immediately killing the mother. Doctors worked frantically to extract shrapnel from the little girl’s body. After giving her drugs to calm her down, they proceeded to the X-Ray room. The young girl's father arrived from work and discovered his injured daughter laying on the surgical table, then collapsed and began to cry. Due to the quick response of the medical staff, the little girl survived but two young Free Syrian Army soldiers who arrived shortly after her died.

Another casualty was a young man who was transported to the hospital by a soldier from the Free Syrian Army. The man was shot twice by a sniper. The first bullet went through his chest and the second struck him in his back and was still in his body. The doctor hurried to stop hemorrhaging and didn't hesitate to put his finger into the hole to stop the bleeding. To calm the patient down, they gave him drugs and taped his eyes shut to avoid hallucinations. After an X-Ray, he was sent to the operation room. Doctors did not succeed in removing the bullet from his back but he later survived.

This is a daily occurrence for the doctors and staff of this hospital in Aleppo and many others throughout the country that are doing their best with what they have to stop the bleeding of Syria's conflict.

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The Azerbaijan Army Today
Agdam, Azerbaijan
By Mais Istanbuli
18 Jun 2013

The Azerbaijani army celebrates the 95th anniversary of the formation of the National Army of Azerbaijan in the Karabakh region of Agdam. The National Army of Azerbaijan was formed on June 26, 1918 and consists of the army, air force and air defense forces, and naval forces. The modern Azerbaijani army was established in 1993, during the Nagorno-Karabakh war, on the basis that urban militias were associated with local self-defense groups.

In 1998, the Armed Forces of Azerbaijan amounted to more than 72,000 people. The Army (55,600 men and officers) had 245 tanks, 335 armored combat vehicles, about 300 field artillery pieces, missile systems, mortars, and more than 60 air defense missile systems. Air Force and Air Defense Forces (10.4 million people) had 37 combat air-crafts, 15 combat helicopters, and 100 air defense missile systems. The navy (2.2 million people) had 39 combat ships and boats. In 2005, the Armed Forces of the Republic of Azerbaijan had 95 thousand personnel, including the Army, Air Defense, and the Navy. By 2010, the size of the armed forces reduced to 66,940 personnel.

Since September 1999, the Azerbaijani military has been exercising peacekeeping in Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq. The army's main international partners include Turkey, Ukraine, Pakistan, Israel, Slovenia, the United States, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

In 1988, a war started between Armenians and Azerbaijanis in the Caucasus region, which was fueled by inter-communal conflict that took place the preceding year. By December 1988, most Armenians and Azerbaijanis were involved in the conflict, as it transformed from a local problem in Nagorno-Karabakh to an "open inter-ethnic confrontation", according to AN Yamskov.

Between 1991-1994, the conflict led to large-scale military action for control of Nagorno-Karabakh and some surrounding territories. On May 5, 1994, a ceasefire agreement, the Bishkek Protocol, was signed between Armenia and the self-proclaimed Nagorno-Karabakh Republic, on one hand, and Azerbaijan, on the other hand.

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The Azerbaijani Army Today (16 of 20)
Agdam, Azerbaijan
By Tofik Babayev
18 Jun 2013

The former Soviet Union use old-fashioned Army UAZ jeeps in the Azerbaijani army. These are best suited for off-road conditions in the desert. Many of the soldiers who know how to drive cars tend to become jeep commanders, benefiting from a lighter schedule of services in Agdam, Azerbaijan, June, 2013.