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Little Jerusalem in Italy (10 of 19)
Pitigliano, Italy
By Nili Bassan
17 Apr 2013

Pitigliano,Italy.
Pitigliano also known as "Little Jerusalem".
Other points of similarity between the two cities, the small streets, the landscape and the light.

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Remnants of the Syrian army
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
16 Apr 2013

A flag of the Syrian regime is what remains after the FSA liberated the area after a big battle in the Great Umayya Mosque in the old city of Aleppo

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Criminal Decorations
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
11 Apr 2013

Islamic decorations in the "Umayyad mousqe" in Aleppo have been destroyed.

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Antakia's destruction in Aleppo
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
10 Apr 2013

The photo portrays the big damage in "antakia market" in the Old City of Aleppo .

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Crowded Market
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
10 Apr 2013

"Souk al-madina," meaning the market of the city , is the most famous market in the Old City of Aleppo and one of the most damaged sites there .

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Destroying Aleppo's Heritage
Aleppo, Syria
By Mais Istanbuli
05 Apr 2013

The Old City of Aleppo, located in Syria, carries historical significance since the 12th century. It is known as the historic city center of Aleppo. Historically, Aleppo had been part of diverse states such as the Roman Empire, the Umayyad Caliphate and the Ottoman Empire. So, it is needless to say that the history of Aleppo carries immense ethnic and religious diversity.

The area contains a large number of ancient buildings, mosques, churches, and madrasas.

It is also important to note that the ancient city of Aleppo was considered a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1986, due to its large old mansions, historic souks, and ancient caravansaries.

Unfortunately, most of the area has been destroyed, the history is found under the rubble, and the beauty of what once was has vanished.

Important monuments such as Souq al Madina were destroyed and burnt due to the major attack that was launched by the FSA in September 2012. Also, many other buildings and monuments have been destroyed as a result of the bomb that were dropped by the Syrian government aircrafts and the shells from the artillery.

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The Minaret of the Umayyad Mosque
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
05 Apr 2013

The minaret of the Umayyad Mosque was destroyed during the intense clashes between the FSA and the Syrian Regime.

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Umayyad Mosque
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
05 Apr 2013

The destruction of this Mosque was caused by a fire ignited by regime forces, who then fled the scene.

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Umayyad Mosque
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
05 Apr 2013

The devastation that appears in the courtyard of the Umayyad mosque is a result of the clashes that occurred between the FSA and Syrian Regime.

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Umayyad Mosque
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
05 Apr 2013

The consequences of the clashes are evident on the destroyed walls and arches inside the Umayyad mosque. The walls were used as barricades to protect the regime forces.

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A space of hope
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
03 Apr 2013

The historical market, "Souk Al-Attareen," was destroyed after the intense bombing in the Old City of Aleppo

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Destroyed Historical Mosque
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
03 Apr 2013

The destroyed outer wall of the Umayyad Mosque in the Old City of Aleppo

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Commercial Road Towards War
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
03 Apr 2013

"Souk al-Madina" is the most famous market in the Old City of Aleppo. An FSA military checkpoint is located at the end of the road.

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Pistachio Market
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
03 Apr 2013

"Souk al-Fostuq," meaning "pistachio market", is one of the historical markets in the Old City of Aleppo . It was destroyed by the excessive bombing.

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Pistachio Sun
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
03 Apr 2013

A photo from "pistachio square" in the Old City of Aleppo that was previously bombed by the Syrian army.

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Door that leads to destruction
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
29 Mar 2013

Walls and rooftops next the rear wall of the Umayya Mosque were collapsed by rockets used by Assad's regime in the Old City of Aleppo.

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Covered souk in the old city of Aleppo
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
28 Mar 2013

It was a covered souk built in 1180 AD, but the regime forces bombed the area during the excessive fighting in the city.

Souk Antakia , old city of Aleppo

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Hole in the Wall
Aleppo, Syria
By Yusuf mousa
26 Mar 2013

Regime forces aimed rockets at this Souk to detect FSA bases in the area.

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Archaeologists Discover Paleolithic A...
Vila Nova de Foz Coa Douro, Portugal
By U.S. Editor
11 Feb 2013

COA VALLEY, Portugal -- 18 January 2013 -- WHOEVER carved the graceful figures into the rocks of this valley on the upper reaches of the River Douro had no camera, pencils or paper. Though recent discoveries by Portuguese archaeologists have confirmed that the Palaeolithic Sapiens Sapiens that inhabited the Coa Valley 30,000 to 10,000 years ago were among the first humans to invent animation.

Using a quartzite tool, they carved thousands of depictions of animals, some of which - like the Przewalski's horse at the site on the upper part of the Coa Valley at Penascosa - show a clear understanding of movement depicted in animation, archaeologists here say.

"We cannot prove what the carvings were intended to do exactly...But if you consider cinema, then it is like two or three frames a second," says Antonio Batarda, an archaeologist who specializes in the animated figures of the Coa Valley Archaeological Park.

"What they are doing with these figures, when you analyse it...Is cinema," says Luis Miguel de Silva Simoes Luis (Luis Luis), another archaeologist at the Coa Valley Archaeological Park Museum.

"They break down movement and recompose it...What you then see is a goat or horse moving it's legs or head," he explains.

One sheltered site still shows the remains of ocre-painted figures, which are mostly of large herbivores such as the Aurochs - a bovine species about three times the size of the bulls and cows we see today. Other rock panels at the various sites here depict classic species of the Pleistiocene like the large deer Megalocerus, the Ibex, Aurochsen, horses and various species of goat - to name but a few. Rare human figures are also depicted. The tradition of carving on the rock panels here continued through the Neolithic and right up until recent centuries with Christian motiffs.

Back in the Palaeolithic, the Coa Valley - which still has a unique micro-climate - would have provided an easy environment for the small groups of Sapiens Sapiens living a nomadic hunter-gather existence. Outside of the valley, large predatory species like lions were common and the River Coa provided a certain security and was abundant in game.

Strangely, many of the figures carved onto the rocks beside the River Coa depict animals which would have been a significant challenge for Palaeoloithic man to hunt.

"Hunting was important...But it was mostly entertainment, as it was mostly the animal behaviour which seemed to have interested them," Antonio Batarda says, adding that it is impossible to prove what the animated figures (or the non-animated ones) were actually used for.

It is likely, he says, that the animations were indeed just that, using fire and screens in co-ordinated movement to create the illusion of movement, rather like the special effects on the stage of a late Victorian theatre. Animals were of great importance to Palaeolithic man and were likely to have been a form of entertainment in themselves, Batarda adds.

There are around one hundred panels depicting animated movement. Sometimes it is subtle, such as a horse flicking it's ears or a goat sticking out it's tongue. Others are more complex and show a horse moving it's head or a goat involved in a mating display.

Not all the archaeologists here are certain about the sites being an ancient cinema, but all agree that the carvings are definately animations.

"I compare it with comic books...I think it may be pushing it a bit to say it was cinema. Though it was the first time we know that animation was used," says Antonio Martinho Baptista, the Director of the Coa Valley Archaeological Park.

Mr Martinho Baptista says that the Palaeolithic humans who inhabited the Coa Valley were nomadic and wandered around in small groups of 30-50 individuals over a radius of around 90 miles and were probably around a thousand or so in number.

The site was discovered in the mid 1990s during archaeological surveys to construct a hydro-electric dam. It soon became a UNESCO World Heritage Site and thus far, archaeologists have found around 100 outdoor rock carvings which show some form of animation.

"I believe it had a function...This was public art," says Martinho Baptista. He says that as it was public - it was probable that the carvings were used for story telling and education. Religion may have also played a part, the figures show many pregnant animals, possibly signifying some kind of reverence for the creation of new life.

This makes sites of outdoor Upper Palaeolithic art like the Coa Valley very important in our understanding of our ancient ancestors, he adds. While the Lascaux cave paintings are famous, Mr Martinho Baptista believes cave art was rare and that much of the art of the Upper Palaolithic was outdoors carved on rocks like in the Coa Valley.

"Why did we find the art at Lascaux? Because they were protected. Nowadays, we think that the open air Palaeolithic art was much more common...Though much of it has been destroyed by wind and rain...Probably cave art in this time was exceptional," says Luis.

One of the more tender carvings depicts a moment of affection between two horses, a favourite of the museum's director. For Martinho Baptista, this is a prime example of the keen eye of Palaeolithic man. "It's a masterful work...It was made 20,000 years ago...But could be shown in a gallery by a modern artist today," he says.

Whatever the actual true use of these rock carving animations was, it is clear that these recent discoveries by Portuguese archaeologists in the Coa Valley render the popular image of prehistoric man quite obsolete. "Palaeolithic man was an artist just like some contemporary ones," Martinho Bapista says. -ends- approx 700 words

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Jericho, Palestine
Jericho palestine
By Firas Mukarker
02 Feb 2013

Jericho is the Oldest city in Palestine it is more than 10,000 Years old, below sea level, and a very warm valley in winter time , amazing place for tourism , and healthy agricultural area , in the center of Palestine near the dead sea

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Archaeologists discover Paleolithic a...
Vila Nova de Foz Coa Douro Portugal
By Jonathan Mitchell
18 Jan 2013

Archaeologists have discovered 100 or so rock carvings from the Upper Palaeolithic (10,000 to 30,000 years ago) which depict basic animation at 2 to 3 frames per second. This panel depicts a Auroch (a large ancient bovine species) in two frames.

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Archaeologists discover Paleolithic a...
Foz Coa Douro, Portugal
By Jonathan Mitchell
17 Jan 2013

In the Coa Valley of northern Portugal, archaeologists have discovered around 100 rock panels which depict animation at 2 or 3 frames per second carved onto the rocks of the valley. This is a pan shot of the Coa Valley.

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Archaeologists discover Paleolithic a...
Foz Coa Douro, Portugal
By Jonathan Mitchell
17 Jan 2013

Archaeologists have discovered 100 or so rock carvings from the Upper Palaeolithic (10,000 to 30,000 years ago) which depict basic animation at 2 to 3 frames per second. Although hard to see, this horse's ears move. GIF animation (handout) available on request.

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Archaeologists discover Paleolithic a...
Villa Nova de Foz Coa Douro Portugal
By Jonathan Mitchell
17 Jan 2013

Archaeologists have discovered 100 or so rock carvings from the Upper Palaeolithic (10,000 to 30,000 years ago) which depict basic animation at 2 to 3 frames per second. Here one of the figures is traced out by one of the Coa Valley Archaeological Park guides.

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Archaeologists discover Paleolithic a...
Foz Coa, Portugal
By Jonathan Mitchell
17 Jan 2013

Archaeologists have discovered 100 or so rock carvings from the Upper Palaeolithic (10,000 to 30,000 years ago) which depict basic animation at 2 to 3 frames per second. Sited in the Coa Valley of northern Portugal, they are the first known examples of animation.

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Archaeologists discover Paleolithic a...
Foz Coa Douro Portugal
By Jonathan Mitchell
17 Jan 2013

Archaeologists have discovered 100 or so rock carvings from the Upper Palaeolithic (10,000 to 30,000 years ago) which depict basic animation at 2 to 3 frames per second.

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Protest on the 11th anniversary of th...
New Delhi , India
By newspoint
15 Dec 2012

On the 11th anniversary of the Parliament attack, Bajrang Dal held a protest in Jantar Mantar, New Delhi.


“11 years have passed since the attack but the perpetrators have not been punished yet. The government has set up a fast track court for the speedy completion of the case. But despite the court decision, justice has been delayed because of the misinterpretion of Article 72 of the Constitution."

-Byte in Hindi- Volunteer of Bajrang Dal

“The dreaded terrorist Afzal Guru, who has been sentenced to capital punishment by the Supreme Court, is still alive because of our cowardly government surrendered, before the appeasement policy and the vote."

  • Byte in Hindi- Volunteer of Bajrang Dal

Local News Agency: News Point TV 
Shooting Dateline: December 14th, 2012
Shooting Location: New Delhi, (INDIA) 
Publishing Time: December 14th, 2012
Length: 0:4:02
Video Size: 147.5 MB
Language: Hindi 
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera.

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20th Anniversary of Babri Mosque Demo...
Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh, India
By newspoint
07 Dec 2012

The 20th anniversary of Babri mosque of Ayodhya. The 6th of December 1992 became a historical date in Indian history. After the demolishment of Babri masque in the Hindu’s spiritually city Ayodhya, a rift created between the two communities (Hindu & Muslim) Ayodhya was prohibited by the Government for a long time.
A superstructure called the Babri mosque standing in the city of Ayodhya, came crashing down. It remains even today a traumatic event for the nation, because modern Indians had not yet been weaned on a true history of India but on the Macaulayian version of the destruction of the structure as criminal vandalism.
However, the real act of vandalism was the superstructure built on a hoary and existing temple, and the vandals came from abroad to demolish the temple, and to build a mosque on the same spot. But temples, once it is shown that (prana prathista puj) wordhip was performed to build it, is where God or the deity resides, and therefore a temple belongs to God forever.
Babri mosque was built as an affront to the Hindus. Otherwise it could have been built anywhere else since namaz can be offered anywhere. Hindus can be proud to have prevailed in history because despite 800 years of Islamic and 200 years of Christian domination, Bharat today is still over 80 per cent of Hindus in population, and a continuing Hindu civilisation.

Byte-Hidu’s (Sant) Pious, Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh
“I don’t want to hurt anyone's feelings. We are doing these programs (Bhajan, Kirtan) merely for build Ram temple at Lord RAM birth place in Ayodhya. The Babri Mosque demolition is not good for Muslims but Babar was to attacker and he attacked both Hindu & Muslims. Place of prayer should not be on anyone name like (Babri mosque) BABRI MASJID.”

Byte- Eye witness, Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh
“I am connected with these cases since 1986. It seems that the Court will not sort out this issue.”

Byte- Eye witness, Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh
“The issue (Temple & Mosque) will not give a chance to Politicians. Whether it is Mulayam Singh Yadav (Leader of Samajwadi Party), Mayawati (Leader of Bahujan Samjwadi Party), Maneka Gandhi (Leader of Bhartiya Janta Party) or Sonia Gandhi (President of UPA). Now it should be stopped. If it continues, then there won’t be any development of Ayodhya”.

Byte-Hidu’s (Sant) Pious, Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh
“At that time we were scared looked at the chaos. But now, I felt that incident was caused by political parties. Now we had forgotten old quarrels and live with love both Hindu & Muslim.”

Byte – Resident, Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh
“ Ayodhya has not developed yet because nobody paid priority of Lord Ramachandra. I am a Muslim guy. I can proudly say that I am a resident of Ayoddhya but there did not any kind of development. People here live in amity. Political parties try to create rift again between two communities, they have failed.”

Local News Agency: News Point TV
Shooting Dateline: December 7th, 2012
Shooting Location: Ayodhya, Utter Pradesh (INDIA)
Publishing Time: December 7th, 2012
Length: 0:6:51
Video Size: 210.3 MB
Language: Hindi

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Bara Imambara of royal city Lucknow II
Lucknow, Utter Pradesh, India
By newspoint
17 Oct 2012

Bara Imambara is the grandest building of Lucknow, including the large Asfi mosque, the bhulbhulayah (labyrinth), and a well with running water. Two imposing gateways lead to the main hall. The Bara Imambara was built in 1784 during a devastating famine and one of Asaf-ud-Daula's objectives in embarking on this grandiose project was to provide employment for people in the region. According to reports, the famine continued for over a decade and the construction of the building continued for this time. It is said that ordinary people used to work in the day building up the edifice, while noblemen and other elite were called in at night to break down all the structure built each day, as they were incapable of doing anything else. These see-saw efforts continued until the period of famine was over. It was a project that preceded a Keynesian-like intervention for employment generation.

Byte- Nawab Mir Jafar Abdullah, Descendant of Nawab (peer) (Urdu)
“It is identified as the largest amongst Asifi Imambara in Lucknow is also known as Bara Imambara. Before making Imambara, Asif made a luxurious mosque. This is because of the importance of Bara Imambara in Muhrram Tazia of the Imam Hussein (a.s), first launched in India. Bara Imambara was built in 1784. Bara Imambara is so important in architectural beauty, Bara Imambara is a great matter for civil engineer.”

Byte-M A Khan, Senior Conservator Assistant archeology Department of India (Hindi)
“The big Imambara was made by Asif Uddullah. During his reign, he made Imambara for the people so that they had a chance to work. When he went to that mosque named Asifi, he felt there had to be an Imambara there too. Then he made his own Imambara and the amazing architectural accomplishment was a terrace without any supportive pillars. At that time there were no buildings as such in the whole world. The height of the building is 165ft long and 55ft broad. This type of building is never seen anywhere. A famous feature there, was a labyrinth where people used to get disguised and face difficulties while coming back to that area, which seems wonder because of two things of Imambara.” Local News Agency: News Point TV
Shooting Dateline: October 16, 2012
Shooting Location: Lucknow, Utter Pradesh (INDIA)
Publishing Time: October 16, 2012
Length: 0:10:24
Video Size: 168 MB
Language: Hindi
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera:
SHOT LIST:
1. Long shot of entrance gate of Imambara
2. Camera pan left
3. Mid Close Up shot of design of Imambara gate
4. Various shot of Imambara
5. Different Angel shot of Imambara
6. Long Shot of Central Hall of Imambara
7. Wide shots campus of Imambara
8. Zoom out shot of Imambara

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Bara Imambara of royal city Lucknow I
Lucknow, Utter Pradesh, India
By newspoint
17 Oct 2012

Bara Imambara is the grandest building of Lucknow, including the large Asfi mosque, the bhulbhulayah (labyrinth), and a well with running water. Two imposing gateways lead to the main hall. The Bara Imambara was built in 1784 during a devastating famine and one of Asaf-ud-Daula's objectives in embarking on this grandiose project was to provide employment for people in the region. According to reports, the famine continued for over a decade and the construction of the building continued for this time. It is said that ordinary people used to work in the day building up the edifice, while noblemen and other elite were called in at night to break down all the structure built each day, as they were incapable of doing anything else. These see-saw efforts continued until the period of famine was over. It was a project that preceded a Keynesian-like intervention for employment generation.

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Sarabdek 04
Pamir Mountains
By karolinasamborska
03 Oct 2012

Sarabdek with his youngest daughter (in a middle) and his daughter in law (at the left).

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Sarabdek 05
Pamir Mountains
By karolinasamborska
02 Oct 2012

Boy threshes grain with oxen. In the village as electricity is not reliable most of the work is done manually or with the help of animals.

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Sarabdek 06
Pamir Mountains
By karolinasamborska
02 Oct 2012

Somersault on a haystack of threshed grain.

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SYRIA'S HERITAGE SITES; BSM STRIKE; P...
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
01 Oct 2012

Rising concern over Syria's historic world heritage sites prompts scientific, archaeological and religious organizations to call for increased local and international pressure on Syria to stop the destruction of their cultural heritage.

Municipal workers from Barcelona Municipal Services (BSM) called a 24 hour strike today, Monday, October 1, 2012, with over 400 workers demonstrating in the streets of Barcelona in protest against budget cuts, including Christmas bonuses, being implemented in accordance with austerity laws approved by the Spanish government. The workers want to negotiate a solution with Municipal Services that would allow them to recover an economic loss that represents a 14% cut in their wages.

The 30th annual Pharaohs International Rally kicked off on Monday, October 1, 2012 near the Giza pyramids, to the enthusiasm of an international crowd waiting to see which top international competitor will come out ahead. Top contenders for the race include Emirati driver Khalifa al-Mutaiwei and French driver Jean-Louis Schlesser.

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Sarabdek 10
Pamir Mountains
By karolinasamborska
01 Oct 2012

Physical education classes. In the village there are two schools, primary and secondary. There are 180 students.

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Editor's Picks 5 September 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
04 Sep 2012

Morsi calls for Assad to step down
Morsi meets with Norwegian Foreign Minister
Attack on Uthman Pasha School
Eviction & Destruction of homes in Cambodia, making way for development.

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Albania. Contrasts. Postcard 9
Albania, Gjirokastra
By Michał Kowalski
04 Sep 2012

Enver Hoxha family home, the communist dictator of Albania. Gjirokastra.

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Sergey Abgorian
Yereven
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
22 Feb 2012

Sergey Abgorian is an Armenian veteran who fought in the Red Army against the Germans on the Russian front during WWII.

"Chechen fighters placed two captured Russian soldiers into a small ravine as a trick and to ambush my rescue party," he said. "As we arrived to save them, the Chechens were waiting for us and started shooting. A bullet went right through my hair, and I felt it."

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Per Mortensen
Copenhagen
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
15 Feb 2012

Per Mortensen fought during WWII in Denmark against the German occupier as part of a partisan outfit.

"In June 1943 my cousin was captured by the Danish police, so a few hours later I decided to join BOPA," he said. "My cousin was put to jail for a while, but because he acted like a crazy person he was sent later to a hospital. In October, I arranged for his escape."

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Agim Karajozi
Flushing, NY
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
14 Feb 2012

Agim Karajozi is a Albanian WWII veteran who fought in his country as part of a partisan outfit against the Italian and German army.

"By the fall 1942, I joined Balli Kombetar brigade," he said. "Some of my family members made me realize what the Communists were really up to in my country, so I decided to fight against them."