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Clashes in Tunisia over Petrofac Jobs
Kerkennah
By Mourad TEYEB
14 Apr 2016

Clashes erupted on Thursday and Friday evenings in Kerkennah, an island off the east coast of Tunisia, between police and demonstrators.
Police used tear gas and water jets to disperse protesters who threw stones at law enforcement officers.
Residents of the island have been carrying out protests against the British oil company Petrofac, which they accuse of denying jobs to unemployed youth on the island.

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

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In Search of Poland's Black Gold
Walbrzych, Poland
By Michael Biach
29 Dec 2014

(FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST)

For centuries coal mining has been the most important industry in Walbrzych, Poland. However, in the 1980s many of the coal mines became unprofitable. With Poland's transformation from a state-directed to a free-market economy in the 1990s, nearly all of the coal mines in Lower Silesia were shut down. Thousands of people became jobless.

The area still has one of the highest unemployment rates in the country despite new industry settling in the area. It didn't take very long until the jobless miners in the area started to dig for coal on their own. The business is dangerous and illegal. Tunnels leading as deep as ten or fifteen meters below the ground are only protected by wood and sandbags. Inside, people dig for coal the same way they did centuries ago, by hand.

Police regularly arrest illegal coal miners and confiscate their equipment, so most people dig by night to avoid police control. Not only the well-educated former miners search for 'black gold,' but also young and unexperienced jobless men risk their freedom and their lives to make a couple of Euros a night by selling illegal coal to residents.

Every year several people die after tunnels collapse. Roman Janiszek is a former coal miner, now an illegal miner who has founded a committee that is trying to make the activities legal and also to keep track of the situation in the outskirts of Walbrzych. Roman also points to the fact that people not only lost their jobs and privileges but also their social position with the closing of the mines. Once prideful coal miners, people like Roman Janiszek now work illegally every night to make a living.

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Slovakia: Bratislava's White-Gloved H...
Bratislava
By danubestory
09 Dec 2014

Donning dapper navy blue uniforms and traditional caps, complete with pristine white gloves, a few of Bratislava’s homeless have revived the role of the traditional baggage porter.

Bratislava Railway Station is a dowdy, yet charming old building with scarce facilities and no modern equipment, making it less accessible to elderly people, families traveling with children, and people carrying heavy luggage. Getting to the train with heavy bags and baby strollers is a real challenge. Meanwhile, outside the train station approximately four to five thousand homeless people face harsh conditions with little chance of find work. A local NGO called Proti Prudu (Against the Stream) works with the homeless, providing them with a street paper called Nota Bene, that they offer to passers by in exchange for spare change. Now, they have launched an ingenious project offering part-time jobs to seven of the homeless they work with to attack both issues. They pay the porters for part-time work helping people with their bags, free of charge. These men who once depended completely on the help of others are finding a bit of much needed economic stability and a new sense of social pride by offering a much appreciated hand to others.

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Slovakia: Bratislava's White-Gloved H...
Bratislava
By danubestory
08 Dec 2014

Donning dapper navy blue uniforms and traditional caps, complete with pristine white gloves, a few of Bratislava’s homeless have revived the role of the traditional baggage porter.

Bratislava Railway Station is a dowdy, yet charming old building with scarce facilities and no modern equipment, making it less accessible to elderly people, families traveling with children, and people carrying heavy luggage. Getting to the train with heavy bags and baby strollers is a real challenge. Meanwhile, outside the train station approximately four to five thousand homeless people face harsh conditions with little chance of find work. A local NGO called Proti Prudu (Against the Stream) works with the homeless, providing them with a street paper called Nota Bene, that they offer to passers by in exchange for spare change. Now, they have launched an ingenious project offering part-time jobs to seven of the homeless they work with to attack both issues. They pay the porters for part-time work helping people with their bags, free of charge. These men who once depended completely on the help of others are finding a bit of much needed economic stability and a new sense of social pride by offering a much appreciated hand to others.

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Young Serbians Skeptical about Serbia...
Belgrade
By mattia.marinolli
25 Aug 2014

Serbia’s bid to join the ranks of the European Union has led young Serbians to question whether their country could live up to EU regulations and political commitments. Some even question whether or not membership would bring the long awaited benefits they hoped for.

Serbia went through sweeping changes in the last fifteen years. The country's borders were altered many times, and even if the nation closed the chapter on the Balkan wars of the 1990s, the effects of the past still echo in contemporary Serbian society.

Rejhana, 21, is a third-year art student at the State University in the southwestern city of Novi Pazar. She was a successful tennis player, but an injury stopped her career.

"I quite hope I will go somewhere else to live,” she says. “I would like to attend postgraduate studies somewhere in Europe and try to stay there. I think there’s not much perspective for people who are keen on art in our country, especially our city.”

Rather than staying in her native Serbia, Rejhana would like to devote herself to traveling and “meeting the world and its gifts.”

“I can see myself as a painter in the future, for example in five years, not in Serbia but in some European country, having individual exhibitions and a permanent job,” she said.

The biggest and most populous country in the western Balkans seems to be the furthest one from Europe. Serbia began its membership talks with the European Union last January. The arrest and extradition of the last of the country’s indicted war criminals and talks with Kosovo to normalize relations were the two key points demanded by Brussels as conditions to EU membership.

“Even though I think we are quite far from EU in terms of our mentality, our attitudes,” Rejhana said, “we [the youth] hope this will change in the future with entrance into the EU."

Serbia's situation is fragile. The unemployment rate is above 20 percent, and a lack of foreign investments has slowed down economic growth in the country. Furthermore, Cyclone Tamara, the worst of its kind in 120 years of recorded weather measurements, hit the region around Belgrade in last June.

Marko, 26, is the local youth representative of the Democratic Party of Serbia in Raska, a small town in south-central Serbia. Although he studies in the Faculty of Security in Belgrade, he spends a lot of time in his hometown and expressed concern for the situation of the youth there.

"There are a lot of problems getting a job in my hometown,” he said. “Over 50 percent of the youth is unemployed here. Politicians easily employ people they want, no matter if they are qualified for the job or not, and we often see situations where unqualified people work in places are normally reserved for those who graduated and are experts, but do not have political connections.”

Marko looks forward to better times if Serbia gets closer to the EU, attracting more investments and improving the country’s economy. “I worked on projects which were funded by the EU, and because of this experience, I can certify that the means of the EU would contribute to the faster development of our country and employment of the youth.”

However, Marko is also worried that being part of the EU could lead many young qualified people to leave Serbia, as “opportunities will undoubtedly become much easier than before.”

“The bad side to entrance [into the EU] is that if highly educated people leave the country, then unqualified people will remain and be left only to perform unskilled labor,” he said.

Others remain skeptical about the European Union, considering the less-than-stellar performances neighboring countries that passed through the integration process, like Romania and Croatia; and the 1999 NATO bombings in Belgrade that indelibly marked many Serbs.

Marija, 23, has just finished her BA in German language and now is attending an MA program in Kragujevac.

“I have to say that EU is not held by the whole European members, but only by some countries within it,” she said. “It is not known that the EU commands the living conditions of other countries. Small countries like Serbia were just dropped into a system of aristocratic rule. Countries like Germany or the UK actually command the economic flow and get the credit.”

Serbia has its own fight against the corruption in the political system that has contaminated the economic sector. Membership of a political party seems to be a prerogative if someone wants to get a job, and the salaries are too low to ensure proper living conditions.

Milanka, also 23, comes from Blace, a town in southeast Serbia. She studies Literature and Literary Theory in Belgrade.

"Unemployment is a huge problem,” she said. “People work for very little money. I did not have any perspective there (Blace), and I moved to Belgrade just because I was convinced I would have more opportunities here. The university is better. I could make some contacts with people who could help me to go abroad. I had a dream to leave Serbia; because, being a disabled person, I am aware that my chances for having a normal life in Serbia are small.”

The young Serbian says that many employers don’t employ a person with disabilities. “Some employers were very kind with me, and they told me they would call me, but they did not,” she adds.

“Political factors will decide if Serbia will enter the EU ,and I do not have a defined attitude towards the EU,” Milanka said. “Neither do many people. Even if we entered the EU, we would hardly get used to the tasks which they would require from us. Standards are quite different, and it would take years for Serbia to adopt their way of thinking and acting. We are simply not at the same level. Our nation is really specific. We are quite stubborn, odd and focused on personal ideas more than on work. Garrulity is one of our defining personal characteristics."

Many young people are conscious of the lack of prospects awaiting them once they finish their studies. Some look for better perspectives abroad, with Germany and Northern Europe among their preferred destinations. But the same youths, mistrustful and critical of the Serbian system, may be the generation that will lead Serbia out of its past.

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Youth unemployment
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

Teenagers hanging out in the main square. Unemployment forces youth to either leave Pungesti, work with their family or apply for jobs at Chevron.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
14 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
14 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
17 Jun 2013

A woman's leg in the a moulding field working to earn a living and feed her wards owing to her husband jobless in the oil rich Bayelsa, Nigeria.

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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
17 Jun 2013

A woman digs into the moulding sand by the road side of Yenagoa to get small rocks for building contruction in the oil rich Bayelsa state owing to husband jobless to provide for the family.

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Viome 7
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

About 40 people work actually in Viome. They work 8 hours each day and take the basic wages.

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Viome 5
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

Viome's worker inside the factory

With unemployment climbing to 30%, workers’ income reaching zero, sick and tired of big words, promises and more taxes, unpaid since May 2011 and currently withholding their labour, with the factory abandoned by the employers, the workers of Vio.Me. by decision of their general assembly declare their determination not to fall prey to a condition of perpetual unemployment, but instead to struggle to take the factory in their own hands and operate it themselves.
Thessaloniki, 29.05.2013

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Viome 4
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

A worker during a break in Viome.

Through a formal proposal dating from October 2011 they have been claiming the establishment of a workers' cooperative under full workers’ control, demanding legal recognition for their own workers’ cooperative, as well as for all the others to follow.
Thessaloniki, 29.05.2013

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Mayotte, The Dark Side of The Lagoon ...
Mayotte Island
By Adrien MATTON
17 May 2013

Dzaoudzi airport, rocked at 8000 kilometers from mainland France, by the still waters of its lagoon, the Mayotte Island in the Indian Ocean is the smallest and most recent of French overseas territories.

Aéroport Dzaoudzi, bercée à 8000 kilomètres de la France métropolitaine par les eaux paisibles de son lagon, l'île de Mayotte dans l'Océan Indien, est le plus petit des départements français avec une surface de 375 kms carrés.

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Egypt's unemployment rate jumped to 1...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
03 May 2013

Egypt's unemployment rate increased to 12.7% in 2012, up from 12% in 2011, and 9% in 2010, according to a report released by the Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS).

This brings the total number of unemployed to 3.4 million, up from 3.1 million in 2011, an increase of 242,000 people.

Particularly, the unemployment rate was 42.7 percent among young people between 20 and 24 years old and was 23 percent among those between 25 and 29 in that year.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ahmed Bahaa El-Din Shaaban, member of both the ‎National Association for Change reform movement and ‎Egypt's Socialist Party:

The number of those employed in 2012 was 23.6 million workers; also there were only about 4.7 million working women in Egypt in 2012, according to the figures.

CAPMAS attributed the increase to the circumstances in Egypt following the 25 January Revolution and the ensuing events “that resulted in a slowdown in economic activities during this period.

These data show the need to embark on an economic reform program that prevents the government from relying on foreign aid, loans and deposits in order to provide the resources.

SOUNDBIDTE 2 (Arabic) – Haytham Mohamadeen, member of the political bureau of the revolutionary socialists:

On the other hand, hundreds of workers marked the Labour Day with marches and protests to voice their discontent with the unfulfilled longstanding demands of workers even after the revolution.

Among these demands are the implementation of minimum wage, independent and representative syndicates for workers, and putting an end to legislation that harms the labour movement.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: Archive except the soundbites
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: May 2, 2013
Length: 00:02:11
Video Size: 107 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Various shots of youth at the universities (Archive)
  2. Various shots of people seating in cafes downtown Cairo (Archive)
  3. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Ahmed Bahaa El-Din Shaaban, member of both the ‎National Association for Change reform
  4. Various shots of workers preparing materials and working women inside the factories (Archive)
  5. SOUNDBIDTE 2 (Arabic) – Haytham Mohamadeen, member of the political bureau of the revolutionary socialists:
  6. Various shots of protestors raising banners and poster of former president Gamal Abdel Nasser during a protest marking the Labour Day, downtown Cairo (Archive May: 1)
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UPA Chairperson Sonia Gandhi in Rae B...
Rae Barreli Utter Pradesh , India
By newspoint
06 Nov 2012

UPA Chairperson and Congress President Sonia Gandhi inaugurated a modern coach manufacturing factory in her Lok Sabha constituency Rae Barreli tomorrow.

The inauguration of the Rs 1,685 crore coach factory was delayed for more than a year due to the vexed issue of compensation to farmers whose land was used for the factory.

Beside the inauguration, Sonia also handed over appointment letters to farmers whose land was used for the project. The country's largest public transporter had acquired 541 hectares of land for the coach manufacturing factory, out of which 283 hectares belonged to private land owners.

The Rae Bareli coach factory is expected to cater to railways' increasing demand for coaches by annually rolling out about 1,000 coaches. Currently, the factory is engaged only in assembling coaches.

Byte-Sonia Gandhi, UPA Chairperson

“The coach manufacturing unit here will provide job opportunities to the local residents and farmers who have given their land for this project and add to the development of the area”

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Egyptians Address Morsi during Eid - ...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
27 Oct 2012

During the first Sacrifice Feast (Eid al-Adha) under the rule of President Mohamed Morsi, Egyptians send their president messages with various demands and issues that they wished would have been settled by the Eid.

The lack of security was the number one demand of Egyptians and the first wish they wanted Morsi to hear on this holy Muslim occasion.

Egyptians also address their new President to focus on the youth and work on providing them with housing and job opportunities, as unemployment in the country has exceeded 12%.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Beesa Talaat, Egyptian woman:
“Our demand from President Morsi is security, safety, stability and to live in a clean country, those are mainly the things that he already promised us. Adding to that, we want him to provide us with proper means of public transportation, and also we want the police to return back to normal.” SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Ahmed Abdel-Aaty, Egyptian young man:
“One of the main problems we face is traffic, those few days before Eid; the traffic was unbearable, and one of the main problems also is cleanliness, which they still didn’t find solutions for, so hopefully step by step; we will make some achievement if people would cooperate with the government.”

A clean environment is also among the top demands of Egyptians.

President Morsi launched a two-day “Clean Homeland” campaign late July, during which workers, bulldozers, machines and officials could be seen everywhere nationwide. However, piles of garbage gradually returned to fill Egyptian streets.

Some Egyptians also demand retrial of those who killed peaceful protestors during the January 25 Revolution last year, complaining that most of the perpetrators have been acquitted.

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Ahmed Mansour, Egyptian man, Engineer at General Motors:
“I was hoping to see more achievements from President Mosri, to feel that he came after a real successful revolution and that he came to achieve the goals that were set by that revolution, for me this is the main issue…I don’t feel that President Mosri achieved anything out of the revolution goals.”

President Morsi promised that his first 100-day plan would put an end to five main problems in Egypt: lack of security, garbage in the streets, traffic jams and shortages of bread and fuel. However, monitoring activists say that Morsi achieved only 9.37% of the promises of his first 100 days.

In a previous speech, Morsi gave greater indication of the progress he made in the five major issues than what a lot of Egyptians actually feel.
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 27, 2012 (and archive)
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 27, 2012
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot of the main street in Tahrir Square
2. Long shot of some little boys hanging out in Tahrir Sq.
3. Wide, pan right shot of streets around Tahrir Sq.
4. Long shot of some boys walking around in the square
5. Wide shot of the Egyptian Presidency headquarters in Cairo
6. Medium shot of President Morsi during a press conference at the Presidential Palace (archive)
7. Close shot of a reporter taking notes during President Morsi’s speech (archive)
8. Medium shot of President Mosri continuing his speech (archive)
9. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Beesa Talaat, Egyptian woman:
“Our demand from President Morsi is security, safety, stability and to live in a clean country, those are mainly the things that he already promised us. Adding to that, we want him to provide us with proper means of public transportation, and also we want the police to return back to normal.” 10. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Ahmed Abdel-Aaty, Egyptian young man:
“One of the main problems we face is traffic, those few days before Eid; the traffic was unbearable, and one of the main problems also is cleanliness, which they still didn’t find solutions for, so hopefully step by step; we will make some achievement if people would cooperate with the government.” 11. Various, long shots of streets of Cairo
12. Wide shot of President Morsi heading to deliver a speech at the UN during the UN United Nations General Assembly meeting (archive)
13. Medium shot of President Morsi while giving the speech (archive)
14. Medium shot of the attendees during Morsi’s speech (archive)
15. Medium shot of President Mosri continuing his speech (archive)
16. Wide shot of Talaat Harb Square in downtown Cairo
17. SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Ahmed Mansour, Egyptian man, Engineer at General Motors:
“I was hoping to see more achievements from President Mosri, to feel that he came after a real successful revolution and that he came to achieve the goals that were set by that revolution, for me this is the main issue…I don’t feel that President Mosri achieved anything out of the revolution goals.” 18. Wide shot of a main street in down town Cairo
19. Long shot of little boys hanging out in Tahrir Sq.
20. Various shots of the streets of Cairo
21. Medium shot of President Morsi during a speech to the nation, that was given in Cairo University (archive)
22. Long, pan right shot of President Morsi greeting the attendees of the meeting in Cairo University, after he finished his speech, and leaving the podium (archive)

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EGYPT PRESENTS DRAFT OF CONSTITUTION;...
Cairo, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
10 Oct 2012

Egypt’s Constituent Assembly, the panel responsible for writing the country’s post-revolution constitution, released the first draft of the new constitution for debate and feedback by the public on Wednesday, October 10.

Hundreds of Lebanese teachers protested on Wednesday, October 10, outside the cabinet headquarters in Beirut, demanding that the government to implement a long-awaited salary increase.

On the first anniversary of the Maspero massacre, the relatives of the victims who were either shot or crushed to death by Armored Personnel Carriers, are still waiting for justice after a year of legal proceedings stemming from two cases, one of which witnessed the victims’ lawyers withdraw from the case and the other which saw protesters being put on trial.

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Egypt Targets Foreign Investment To R...
The Fairmont Towers Hotel, Heliopolis, Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
09 Oct 2012

Egyptian Prime Minister Hesham Kandil said on Tuesday, October 9, at the Euromoney Conference Egypt 2012, held in Cairo, that the government set a strategy targeting more involvement of the private sector to reach a goal of USD 28 billion of foreign investments.
Kandil added in the conference, attended by Euromoney Regional Director Richard Banks, that the government economic reform plan also targets a growth rate of 4.3% in FY 2012/2013 in order to provide about 700,000 job opportunities, noting that the government focuses on small and medium enterprises to achieve a growth rate of more than 7% in the coming five years.
SOUNDBITE 1 (English) - Egypt' PM Hesham Kandil:
“The Egyptian government is committed to economic reform and to a free market economy; an economy that is committed to all its contracts and agreements with local and foreign investors and acknowledges the importance of private sector economic growth. The private sector investments within the last seven years average around 60% to 65% of our investments. This year, we target total investment of 276 billion Egyptian pounds with the private sector expected to play another major role worth 170 billion Egyptian pounds, which is equivalent to 28 billion US dollars.” The two-day conference comes under the title "The Return of the Investments to Egypt and the Distribution of the Fruits of Economic Growth".
The huge annual economic event, attended by Egypt’s ministers of finance, investment and communications, urged foreign investors to overcome concerns regarding Egypt’s stability and to invest in the fast-growing fields of banking and software industry.
SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic)- Egypt’s Minister of communications and IT Minister Eng Hani Mahmoud:
“We have a large number of graduates who are qualified to work in the software industry. We also have more than one opportunity for companies to establish centers for software development in Egypt. At the same time, we are also offering to investors the new Technology Park in Maadi.”

SOUNBDITE 3 (Arabic) – Tarek Amer, Chairman of Egypt’s National Bank:
“We, the National Bank, pumped loans worth 22 billion over the past year and a half since the revolution. We continued our work regularly; we weren’t afraid of the circumstances. Yes, of course we had more bank allocations because some customers had problems. However, we still made profits worth much more than these allocations. If you are bold with a good understanding of the market, you can still work and make profit. If we all were afraid, we wouldn’t achieve anything. I can see that our government and the country’s leadership are bold, and the decisions are there to prove it. In the past, we used to lack boldness and decision making. I can see that this has changed today, and that’s why we will move forward.”

For his part, Finance Minister Momtaz Al-Saeed emphasized that investment is the only solution to restore growth and that there is a need to restore investors' confidence in Egypt.
Other officials noted that the country has been trying to attract foreign investors after many left throughout the past year and a half of unrest.
The Euro money conference is the first major economic, financial and business event that takes place in Egypt after the January 25 Revolution.
Euro money is a global financial media company specializing in encouraging, covering and analyzing cross-border flows of investment capital.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCSS
Shooting Dateline: October 9, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 9, 2012
Length: 0:03:00
Video Size: 148 MB Language: English and Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Pan right shot of the Euromoney conference in Cairo
  2. Medium shot of the Director of the Euromoney conference, Richard Banks speaking during the conference
  3. Wide shot of the attendees during the conference
  4. Medium shot of Egypt’s PM Hesham Kandil speaking during the conference
  5. Various shots of the conference, attendees
  6. SOUNDBITE 1 (English) - Egypt' PM Hesham Kandil:
    “The Egyptian government is committed to economic reform and to a free market economy; an economy that is committed to all its contracts and agreements with local and foreign investors and acknowledges the importance of private sector economic growth. The private sector investments within the last seven years average around 60% to 65% of our investments. This year, we target total investment of 276 billion Egyptian pounds with the private sector expected to play another major role worth 170 billion Egyptian pounds, which is equivalent to 28 billion US dollars.”
  7. Various shots of the conference, attendees
  8. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic)- Egypt’s Minister of communications and IT Minister Eng Hani Mahmoud:
    “We have a large number of graduates who are qualified to work in the software industry. We also have more than one opportunity for companies to establish centers for software development in Egypt. At the same time, we are also offering to investors the new Technology Park in Maadi.”
  9. SOUNBDITE 3 (Arabic) – Tarek Amer, Chairman of Egypt’s National Bank:
    “We, the National Bank, pumped loans worth 22 billion over the past year and a half since the revolution. We continued our work regularly; we weren’t afraid of the circumstances. Yes, of course we had more bank allocations because some customers had problems. However, we still made profits worth much more than these allocations. If you are bold with a good understanding of the market, you can still work and make profit. If we all were afraid, we wouldn’t achieve anything. I can see that our government and the country’s leadership are bold, and the decisions are there to prove it. In the past, we used to lack boldness and decision making. I can see that this has changed today, and that’s why we will move forward.”
  10. Various shots of the conference, attendees and speakers
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October 7th, World Day Demonstration ...
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
07 Oct 2012

Barcelona, Spain. Thousands gathered to rally in the streets of Barcelona Sunday, October 7, 2012, to defend the right of everyone to have decent work. The call, made simultaneously across the state, also serves for unions gain momentum and set the stage for what could be a general strike throughout Europe.

Barcelona, Spain. Hoy domingo se han manifestado miles de personas por las calles de Barcelona para defender el derecho de todos a tener un trabajo digno. La convocatoria, que se ha hecho simultáneamente en las principales del Estado, también ha servido para que los sindicatos calienten motores y preparen el terreno por lo que podría ser una huelga general a nivel europeo.