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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: After the ÒSaturday MothersÕÓ 499th meeting, the group traditionally gathers in a nearby cafŽ to drink ay, the traditional Turkish tea, and discuss the current situation. In these days, the main topics are the siege of Kobane, the ISIS offensive, and TurkeyÕs government attitude towards Kurds. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: One of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ does the defiant communist salute at the cafŽ where they traditionally gather after a meeting. Many of the disappeared people were left wing sympathizers or labor union activists, suspected by security forces to be close to PKK. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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The Kurdish "Saturday Mothers"
Istanbul, Turkey
By Piero Castellano
17 Oct 2014

Istanbul (Turkey) October 18th, 2014: Some of the so-called ÒSaturday MothersÓ holding portraits of their disappeared loved ones during their 499th meeting. After 200 meetings, in 1999, the group had to stop their sit-ins because of constant police harassment. After great hopes in the new AKP government went disappointed, they started meeting again in 2009. (Photo by Piero Castellano)

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Kurdish Blacksmith Helps to Armor Pes...
Dohuk
By mchreyteh
13 Oct 2014

Text by Youssef Zbib

Shehbaz Sindi, a Kurdish blacksmith from the Iraqi city of Dohuk, is proud to present his latest invention. It is a truck hidden under roughly wielded metal sheets that, from the first sight, evokes imagery of tanks that date from the First World War.

This is the first prototype, and having worked on it for two months, Sindi will start building the second one after he finalizes it.

“I am in the final stage now,” said Sindi, dressed in the Kurdish traditional Shalvar made of combat-green fabric. “I have to work on the front side now. We need to make the armor 10 centimeters thick in order to block the bullets.”

Sindi hopes that this yellow behemoth on wheels will help Kurdish fighters put an end to ISIS’ rapid advance in predominantly Kurdish areas.

In recent battles, the extremist militant group has proved to be better armed than Kurdish groups it has fought in Syria and Iraq, after it took over US-made weapons and armored vehicles from Iraqi government forces in June.

After ISIS expanded its control on both sides of the Iraqi-Syrian borders and took over Iraq’s second city Mosul, US airplanes targeted ISIS positions and forces in Iraq. The US has also waged a similar a campaign against the group in Syria in September with the participation of allied countries.

Necessity is the mother of invention

Sindi said that the armored vehicle was needed facing the humanitarian distress that Kurds have suffered in recent events.

“We thought of this project after we saw what was happening and how people were fleeing from Sinjar,” said Sindi. “We needed to build something to defend the people and ourselves. We thought of this project out of need.”

In August, thousands of Kurds from the Yezidi religious minority fled their villages in the Shingal area and took refuge on the holy mount of Sinjar as ISIS fighters advanced. Yezidi refugees were stranded there with little food and water supplies for days before US airstrikes broke the siege that ISIS imposed. They were later evacuated into predominantly Kurdish areas in northeastern Syria.

The Kurdish city of Kobani in Syria’s north is currently living a similar crisis. More than a hundred thousand people are believed to have left the city and crossed the border into Turkey as ISIS closed in on the city. Airstrikes conducted by the international coalition seem to have slowed ISIS’ advance but are yet to put an end to it.

Refugees in the Suruc camp on the Turkish side of the border gave harrowing testimonies about the atrocities that ISIS committed in Kobani. According to a report published in the British newspaper The Daily Mail, ISIS militants committed beheadings and mutilation on a very large scale.

But despite this grim reality, Sindi is hopeful that his military invention will push ISIS fighters out of the predominantly Kurdish areas in Iraq and Syria.

“With the help of God, we will use this tank to fight the people who dared to cross the border into Kurdistan,” he said. “I am proud to be the first Kurdish man to ever build a tank. My area and all of Kurdistan is very proud of this invention.”

The armored vehicle, which Sindi calls a “tank,” can carry six fighters, three seated on each side. It can also be equipped with a Russian-made DShK large-caliber machine gun, widely known as Dushka.

Kurdish fighters have not used the makeshift armored vehicle yet. It still has to prove its efficiency in the battlefield, even though Sindi has a lot of faith in his work.

“Concerning mobility… we have tested it and drove it to the highway. It works perfectly,” Sindi said. “Concerning resistance, as you can see here, we have three layers of iron, so when the bullet hits the exterior layer it will not affect the second layer.”

In addition to pushing ISIS fighters out of Kurdish areas, Sindi wants to use his invention to show the world what Kurds can achieve.

“We want to make the country of Kurdistan proud by showing that Kurdish people here can manufacture [weapons],” he said. “And for the people who do not like Kurdistan or Kurdish people, they need to understand that Kurdish people are smart… and are able to build any object they want.”

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Peshmerga Heightens Security in Kurdi...
Erbil
By Maryam Ashrafi
09 Oct 2014

This collection of pictures shows the Kurdish Peshmerga forces' readiness to combat ISIS forces. The capture of Mosul by ISIS was a political game-changer in Iraq. Initially, ISIS’ strategy seemed to consist of taking control of Iraq's Sunni regions and scourge and oppress the Shia population. Kurds optimistically believed that this was solely a conflict between ISIS and the Shias and so adopted a defensive strategy across their region. However, due to Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s anti-Sunni policies and the dissatisfaction of the Iraqi Army, ISIS quickly expanded its control, taking over vast territories in northern Iraq and the Kurdistan area. ISIS took over the Kurdish Yazidi town of Shangal, forcing the Peshmerga to retreat. Yazidis escaped to the nearby mount Sinjar, which they consider a holy site, but were surrounded by ISIS militants. It was at this point that the Syrian People's Defense Forces (YPG) militias and the Peshmerga launched an effective attack against that was aided by US airstrikes. These forces managed to drive the militants back, securing a safe passage for tens of thousands of Yazidis.

Despite these efforts, ISIS continued to threaten more Kurdish territories, taking control over Makhmour and putting Iraqi Kurdistan's capital Erbil at risk. The PKK (Kurdistan Workers' Party) and US Air Force launched another attack, forcing ISIS to retreat from many Kurdish areas, including Makhmour. It became obvious that ISIS was not only targeting the Iraqi Shias but also posed a large threat to Iraqi and Syrian Kurds. Therefore a new tactical coalition between these parties became vital. Iraqi Kurdistan became seriously involved in a war which, two months earlier, was not likely. In some respects it has benefitted Kurds, allowing them to extend the borders of their autonomous region and claim control over the disputed city of Kirkuk. On the other hand, ISIS' quest to impose an Islamic state could spell great danger for the Kurds and the region as a whole.

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Kobane: FSA Faction Joins Fight Again...
Kobane
By TTM Contributor 4
05 Oct 2014

October 5-6, 2014
Kobane, Syria

The frontlines in the city of Kobani/Ain al-Arab where several FSA battalions have a arrived from different fronts to fight along side the Kurdish fighters defending the city against IS. This footage was shot on the edges and inside the city of Kobane on the 5th and 6th of October, 2014.

Shot List
1- statement of formation of the joint operations room under the name of Tigris Volcano
2- shot if fighters from the Al kasas Army
3- shots of clashes between Al Kasas army and IS
4- shot of a fighter firing an RPG during the clashes
4- shots of clashes with light and medium weapons
5- shots of fighters from Al Kasas army heading to the clashes area
6- shots of snipers and sniper activity
7- shots of clashes with IS

interviews and transcripts:

00:03-00:27 "In the name of God, the merciful, the almighty, he said: 'be united under God and do not be dispersed. Remember God's graces, for you are only enemies if you are so in your heart, but with God's grace you will be brothers.' The formation of a joint operations room under the name of Tigris Volcano is meant to stand against the injustice of the Baghdadi Mobs (IS)."

01:40-01:52 (Abu Abdallah) Commander of the Al Kasas battalion: "This is the formation of a unified operations room is meant to merge and organize operations. Of course, as he said in the statement, we are going to liberate Menbej, Raqqa and it's outskirts in the direction of Deir Ez Zour, God willing."

01:52-02:40 (Abu Abdallah) Commander of the Al Kasas battalion: "Of course the city of Ain al-Arab is a Syrian city and it's people are Syrian. We are fighting on Syrian soil and protecting the Syrian people. We are like those fighting in Qalamoun and Deraa and Ghouta, Idlib and Aleppo. God forbid, if we are forced to do a certain thing [retreat], we will go to another place and deploy our forces in more than one place and we will fight them everywhere. We will fight them to the last breath.
We have not received any support from the the government, or the Coalition, or the FSA, or their joint staff, or anyone at all. Be it through men, or gear or ammunition, we have not received anything at all, as if we are not part of the FSA

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In exile: Iraqi women seek refuge
Bardarash, Dohuk, Rovia, Diyarbakir
By Arianna Pagani
24 Sep 2014

During the days of terror on Mount Sinjar, about 200 women were kidnapped by the militias of the Islamic State to be converted to Islam and sold in the occupied cities of Mosul and Tal Afar. This barbarism is not new to the chronicles of war.

The Islamic State's attack on Mount Sinjar led to the exodus of about 500,000 people, mostly from the Christian, Yazidi and Shabak minorities. These refugees, currently under the protection of the Kurdish militias, are living in the streets, under bridges or in abandoned places in Erbil and surrounding villages. Many of those who manage to escape the conflict have suffered losses in their family that effect them not only economically, but mentally and emotionally. Depression and anxiety in addition to insecurity are a constant challenge.

The UNHCR anticipated there to be over 900,000 internally displaced people in Iraq by the end of 2014. With the rise of ISIS, that number has been more than tripled, with 2.9 million displaced according to International Displacement Monitoring Center. The situation of internally displaced women, not only in Iraq but in conflict zones around the world, is especially precarious as the breakdown in social structures is a risk factor for gender-based violence. In their planning document for 2014, the UNHCR says it is ramping up its efforts to protect refugee and internally displaced women. However, agencies like the UNHCR as well as local associations can only care for and provide aid to so many displaced people, leaving others to fend for themselves.

The condition of the women and children displaced in Iraq is tragic: not only from a material point of view, but also from a psychological and ethical perspective. While talking with them, the elderly were crying because they don't see a future for their land, culture or traditions and were continuously asking, "What did we do wrong to deserve to be killed?" The women were mostly passive, trapped between emotions, tears, the inability to react, “deafened by pain and suffering.” They seemed to understand that as time passes by, the hope of returning to a normal and fair life fades away.

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Kobane Refugees in Risky Game of Back...
Suruc, Kobane
By Ulrik Pedersen
24 Sep 2014

September 24-26, 2014
Suruc, Turkey; Kobane, Syria

Syrian-Kurdish refugees from the border town of Kobane are continue to shuffle to and from Turkey, returning to Kobane in moments of calm, and fleeing again as the Islamic State (IS) group pushes closer to the center of town. Turkish authorities have at times sealed the border, leading to clashes between refugees and Turkish police.

According to Turkish authorities, the number of refugees seeking shelter in Turkey from the Islamic State group's advance across northeastern Syria has hit 140,000.The head of Turkey's AFAD disaster management agency, Fuat Oktay, said the figure is the result of Syrians escaping the area near the Syrian border town of Kobane, where fighting has raged between IS and Kurdish fighters since September 18.

Clashes broke out between refugees and Turkish forces on September 26, as refugees destroyed the border fence from inside Turkey to help their fellow Syrians escape. Turkish security forces replied with tear gas, paint pellets, and water cannons.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the Islamic State group has taken control of 64 villages in northeastern Syria. It says that the fate of 800 Kurds from these villages is unknown, adding that the Islamic State group executed 11 civilians, including two boys.

Western forces bombed IS troops outside Kobane, but without proper weapons, the Kurds might not be able to hold the city much longer.

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Yazidis Smuggle Themselves Into Turkey
Zakho, Iraqi Kurdistan
By rsoufi
31 Aug 2014

August 31, 2014
Zakho, Iraq

Thousands of Yazidi refugees who where displaced from their homes in Sinjar, are seeking a new life outside of Iraq. The minority, who ISIS branded as "devil worshipers", fled their homes in Sinjar to apparent safety in Kurdish controlled Dohuk, where they lived in makeshift refugee camps. However, having lost any hope of ever returning to their homes, they chose instead to leave Iraq and look for new opportunities in a European country.
The video shows Yazidi people traveling on foot through the mountains on the Iraqi Kurdistan-Turkish border, as they try to enter Turkey unofficially.

Interviews:

Amin Mirza, Yazidi refugee (man, Arabic):
"I am going to Turkey."

Interviewer: Why did you decide to go to Turkey?
"We are going to Turkey looking for peace, safety and stability."

Interviewer: What happened to you in Sinjar? Can you tell me the story?
"What happened to us in Sinjar didn't happen to anyone else. It was a genocide, we were left with no money or clothes. Two of my nieces were captured by ISIS. My brother, his wife and their two children were also taken by ISIS. Where shall I go? I have to find somewhere safe."

Interviewer: Do you think Turkey is safe and do you think it's possible to settle in Turkey?
"Now it's safer in Turkey, thousands of people from my city are already there and are doing well in Turkey."

Interviewer: Did they all go this way [to Turkey]?
"Yes they all passed through the mountains this way with the help of the PKK."

Interviewer: How long have you been walking for to get to Turkey?
"I don't care if it takes me 2 or 3 days to get there, I will sacrifice myself to get my children to a safer place."

Ginar, Yazidi refugee (woman, Arabic):
"They captured our relatives, but just before they could capture us we ran away. One hour before they took over the town, we knew that the Peshmerga had retreated so we left."

Interviewer: Do you know anyone who was captured by ISIS?
"Yes, my cousin and my brother in law, his wife and children were all taken by ISIS and we know nothing about where they are. We came here to cross to Turkey but we were told that the border is closed and so we are waiting for it to be opened."

Interviewer: How long do you think you can stay here in the mountain?
"We really don't know. Yesterday the children were freezing, we have no food, nothing, we just came as we are. If we have to stay here for two or three more days, I don't think the children will survive.. We adults can stay alive but I doubt the children can."

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frontline in Tuz Khurmatu, Iraq
tuzkhurmatu, iraq
By Arianna Pagani
28 Aug 2014

28 August 2014, Tuz Khurmatu distance about 75 km south of Kirkuk. The Kurdish army launches a mortar to the city occupied by the militants of the Islamic State. The soldiers who were outside the base to help the peshmerga who had been sent on ahead, come back at the end of the fight. No deaths and no injuries.

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Palestinians in Iraq Displaced Repeat...
Erbil
By Jawdat Ahmed
28 Aug 2014

Palestinians, who fled their home country in 1948 and settled in Iraq, have been displaced again in their adopted country. The families left Palestine after the creation of the state of Israel and set up residency in Mosul. They were persecuted under the regime of Saddam Hussein and denied rights of ownership given to regular Iraqi citizens. Despite this they stayed in Mosul for years until ISIS fighters took over the city and encouraged them to fight with them under the pretense of giving the Palestinians a state (Islamic State).

After they refused, the Palestinians fled Mosul to the Khazer refugee camp in the Kalak region, 50km east of Erbil, on the Iraqi-Syrian border, along with other refugees from northern Iraq. However ISIS forces kept advancing, taking over more towns in the region, which lead to the Kurdish Peshmerga evacuating the refugees from the area. They moved the Palestinians to the Baharka camp near Erbil, where they are sheltering for now.

Ibrahim, Palestinian father (man, Arabic):

“At first let me tell you that we are Palestinians, and we have been suffering continuously from 1948 until now. We have been persecuted and treated unjustly since then. Even during the rule of Saddam Hussein, Palestinians used to suffer as well. We weren't allowed to have Iraqi nationality, we couldn't own a house, and we couldn't own anything under our names. Even when Hussein was overthrown and the new regime took control we still suffered. To Arabs in general, Palestinians are terrorists. Anywhere we go, we are always treated in a negative way, once we show our IDs that say that we are Palestinian, the way they treat us changes.

The day the fighters came into Mosul, you can call them whatever you want “ISIS” or “IS” or anything, they already had information that we are Palestinian. They came to us asking us to fight with them, under the pretext that we are oppressed, and that they will help us have our own state. Of course we couldn't allow our children to join the fighting, or else they will be considered terrorists and will probably end up dead, but we had no other choice, no one can argue with them. If we had we would be treated as apostates. They told us we have two days to make our children join the fighting. Even if they can't fight, they will train them and give them salaries. We, the decision makers in the community, held a meeting and decided to flee the area the next day to the Khazer camp.

Our situation is not safe, if the next day Mosul is freed [from ISIS], the government will tell us to go back, but when we are in Mosul, our lives are in danger. Since we are Palestinian, the Iraqi government will treat us as terrorists. If we go to Mosul today, ISIS will punish us because we didn't fight on their side. Either way, our situation in Iraq is dangerous, we thank God we're in Kurdistan now, but our future is unknown. We demand the UNHCR to settle us in another country, because our future here is unstable.”

Ali, Palestinian father (man, Arabic):

“We ask the UN and the Human rights associations to look after us, and take us out of the country. We suffered a lot since we came here. Ever since I was born in this country, I didn't know peace or stability; we have no rights at all. We demand the UN to take us out of Iraq.

We came to this refugee camp without a thing, not even a dollar. We decided to look for a job in order to survive. We are living all together, 8 families supporting and helping each other.

The state of Palestine has provided nothing for us since 1948. We always wished the Palestinian president and the government would look out for us. The only thing we got from any Palestinian official was the official form to get into Erbil easily and that was given by the Palestinian ambassador, here in Iraq.”

Shot list:

00:00 - 01:26 Various shots of Khazer refugee camp and Peshmerga forces
01:27 - 02:16 Various shots of Baharka refugee camp and cutaways of the Palestinian families
08:52 - 10:15 (End) Various shots of Baharka refugee camp and refugees

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frontline in Tuz Khurmatu, Iraq
tuzkhurmatu, iraq
By Arianna Pagani
28 Aug 2014

28 August 2014, Tuz Khurmatu distance about 75 km south of Kirkuk. The Kurdish army launches a mortar to the city occupied by the militants of the Islamic State. The soldiers who were outside the base to help the peshmerga who had been sent on ahead, come back at the end of the fight. No deaths and no injuries.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Between cohabitation and turns the military are able to find moments of fun. Some soldiers playing dominoes in tents.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Every soldier doing his job harder. Many of them come from cities that have been invaded by the army of Islamic state. They perceive a salary and their work shifts are approximately 10 days.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

The peshmerga now have become very important for Kurdistan. For following decades, have had a bad reputation as warriors unconquered of the mountains.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

The soldiers during the breaks have to keep their weapons clean.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

The kitchen where soldiers take turns for preparing dinner for the people in the frontline.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

The young peshmerga fighters have no battle experience. Many of the older pesh merga moved on, starting businesses and embracing the changing face of Kurdistan.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

When the light begins to decline many military take the time to call their families at home. A moment of intimacy in a military base full of men is not easy to find.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

A Kurdish peshmerga prepares a cup of tea before starting his turn in the frontline against IS.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

An officer of the frontline in a moment of pause. That day they discussed the situation about weapons sponsor by the European Union.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

In the bases of the mountains there are instance Peshmerga professionals including many young people.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

There is no exact number of peshmerga fighters. Both youth and adults are lined up against a single enemy. they took up arms under one banner of a united Kurdistan.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

With the coming of night, the air becomes heavier on the frontline. With the darkness the Islamic Army has more ease in advancing position or try to attack the Kurdish army.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

A moment of pause before the exchange with another soldier to control the aera under the frontline. A guy calls his family.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Peshmerga fighters on the front line against militants of IS. The base is close to Bashiqa village and Mosul. During the nights there are different movements of the Sunni guerrillas.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

In the frontline of the mountain Bashiqa, two young Kurdish military are given the change of position. The control over the villages occupied by ISIS is constant.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Some young soldiers are shuttling between major base and a control tower. They bring food for dinner.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

New men come into the frontline of the mountain Bashiqa. Probably ready to join in the Kurdish military. What remains to be seen is how long the pesh merga will be able to rely on the support of outsiders.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

The mountain of Bashiqa is under the control of the Peshmerga. Is also the official name of the armed forces of the Kurdistan Regional Government in the semiautonomous Iraqi Kurdistan. After the continuous advance of the Islamic state Kurds maintained their positions of control.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Kurdish Peshmerga has strengthened its presence in Nineveh province’s. This area is currently disputed between Sunnis members of the Islamic state and the forces of both Kurdish and Iraqi.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Since Aug. 2, IS militants made forays into the peshmerga-controlled territories of the Ninevah plains. They moving into the towns of Hamdaiya, Telkayf, Bartalla and Bashiqa on the north and east of Mosul.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

This guy on the frontline shows off his tattoo which is the symbol of P.U.K an Iraqi-Kurdish political party in Iraqi Kurdistan and YPG.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

On the mountain of Bashiqa. Inside the base camp during the days the soldiers held only controlled the situation. While some boys are resting others prepare for nightfall.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Some soldiers sitting on the rocks looking over the town of Bashiqa. Lying just 18 kilometers from Mosul with two roads linking it to Iraq's most volatile city, Bashiqa and nearby villages in Nineveh provinces. They occupied the heart of Iraq's minority communities for centuries.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

The government of Kurdistan has asked for help to other states to defeat the advance of the Islamic state. During the month of August some countries, among them Italy, have agreed to send weapons to the Kurds.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Many soldiers who are serving on the mountain of Bashiqa are very young. The average age is between 17 and 25 years.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

Some moments of rest during the day. Below it is the city of Bashiqa and Mosul, now under control of IS.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

T he European Union has started to give the Kurds shipments of ammunition, machine guns and mortars.

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Frontline Bashiqa
Bashiqah, Governatorato di Ninawa, Iraq
By Arianna Pagani
26 Aug 2014

After recovering some land that had been invaded by ISIS. The Peshmerga have accepted and agreed with the help arrived from America with the bombing on the enemy positions.