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Asylum Seekers in Spain 18
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 May 2015

Yaya Ouahara (center) attends a workshop at the office of the Catalan Commission for Refugee Aid (CCAR) in Barcelona, with two other migrants and two CCAR staff members.
Yaya, 36 years old from Ivory Coast, arrived to Spain in 2009 by a small boat and after three years traveling through Africa. Yaya fled the civil war in his country and he recently got residence permit to stay in Spain permanently.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 19
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 May 2015

Yaya Ouahara (left) attends a workshop at the office of the Catalan Commission for Refugee Aid (CCAR) in Barcelona, with two other migrants and two CCAR staff members.
Yaya, 36, from Ivory Coast, arrived in Spain in 2009 by a small boat and after three years traveling through Africa. Yaya fled the civil war in his country and he recently got residence permit to stay in Spain permanently.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 20
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 May 2015

Yaya Ouahara (right) collects food distributed by the local NGO Bona Voluntat en Accio, in Barcelona, as part of the food support program to help migrants and people at risk of exclusion.
Yaya, 36, from Ivory Coast, arrived to Spain in 2009 by a small boat and after three years traveling through Africa. Yaya fled the civil war in his country and he recently got residence permit to stay in Spain permanently.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 21
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 May 2015

Yaya Ouahara (right) collects food distributed by the local NGO Bona Voluntat en Accio, in Barcelona, as part of the food support program to help migrants and people at risk of exclusion.
Yaya, 36 years old from Ivory Coast, arrived in Spain in 2009 by a small boat and after three years traveling through Africa. Yaya fled the civil war in his country and he recently got residence permit to stay in Spain permanently.

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A Biodiversity Odyssey (EN)
Worldwide
By Conteur d'images
06 Mar 2015

To celebrate the United Nations Decade on Biodiversity 2011-2020, an environmentalist and a photojournalist visited 10 countries in 300 days in order to discover the most innovative solutions implemented by the peoples of the world to preserve the biodiversity of our planet. A fabulous educational journey through the Amazon, the Arabian desert, the Andes, the Pacific Ocean and more!

TEXTLESS, NATURAL SOUND VERSION / CONFORMED DIALOGUES AVAILABLE ON REQUEST.

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Evicted: Ivory Coast Mega Highway Dis...
Abidjan
By Patrick
20 Oct 2014

After more than a decade of violence and political unrest, Ivory Coast is experiencing important investments from foreign nations in an attempt to encourage economic growth in the country. But while government projects will allegedly benefit the population, some people suffer from evictions that are pushing many Ivoirians from their homes to make room for high-visibility infrastructure projects.

In October, the country announced a $114 million loan from the Export-Import Bank of China at two-percent interest over 20 years to finance a six-lane motorway construction linking Abidjan to the historical city of Grand-Bassam, 30 km to the east.

Gonzagueville belongs to the Port Bouet commune, in the outskirts of the capital. All of the buildings in the suburb of Abidjan have been demolished to make way for the construction of the Abidjan-Grand Bassam motorway.

According to witnesses, police officers arrived early in the morning in the southern coastal suburb of Gonzagueville and burned down several tents, threatening residents and telling them to leave the premises immediately. “Some of us were woken up at 5 A.M,” they say, “and told we had one hour to leave.”

Residents say the government didn't set an official date for them to leave by. They proposed to start next summer to avoid disrupting the school year, but the government refused.
Several miles of houses in Gonzagueville, among other areas, were taken down as part of a $114 million project aimed at developing the tourist sector along Ivory Coast's south coast and help ease congestion in the capital Abidjan.

The Ivoirian government has planned to pay $6.5 million in compensations to relocate the people living in these areas. However many say they haven’t received the money they were promised and are living among the debris of what used to be their homes.

Isaac is a traditional healer. He has no place to go and is staying with a friend. He hasn't been able to work ever since he was evicted due to the lack of space at his friend’s place.

Another resident evicted, Viviane is moving back to her home country, Ghana. She says she hasn't received any compensation. “And even if I did, it would not be enough to buy a new home.”

People claim that residents living in shanties and tents across the coastline in Gonzagueville are constantly threatened by local authorities to leave the area. Those lucky enough move in with friends, but most of those displaced by the demolitions have no place to go and are forgotten by local authorities.

Assouan Carine says that she and her mother were living in a tent with six more families until local authorities burned it down.

Before being evicted, residents remove literally everything from their homes, including the roof, to use it in their future houses. However, several families have no place to go and are surviving among debris in unhealthy environments. Improvised camps can be found across the coastline in Gonzagueville, often hosting multiple families, who struggle to have access to the most basic needs, like clean water.

Most children can't go back to school and have to stay home in the rubble of their former township with their families and help search for steel and re-sellable metal in abandoned houses.

Hotels, churches and gas stations were also taken down. Some crosses are set by residents in the sand across the coastline to mark the former emplacement of churches.

Many other projects are being undertaken by the government – including roads, housing and infrastructure upgrades - to boost the already high production of rubber and cocoa. Ivory Coast is the largest economy in the West African Economic and Monetary Union, and its economic capital Abidjan is known as Western Africa's Paris.