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Filipino Child
Mindanao
By Ralf Falbe
15 Feb 2016

An infant at the NGO German Doctors Hospital in Valencia, Mindanao, Philippines.

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German Doctors Hospital
Mindanao
By Ralf Falbe
15 Feb 2016

Desperate Grandmother with a sick child seeks help at the Hospital of the German Doctors in Valencia, Mindanao, Philippines. The NGO offers free medical treatment for poor hill tribe people.

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German Doctors Provide Free Treatment
Mindanao
By Ralf Falbe
15 Feb 2016

Hilltribe people get free medical treatment in the hospital of the German Doctors in Valencia, Mindanao, Philippines.

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ISIS Operate Islamic Courts and Water...
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
14 Mar 2015

DISCLAIMER: This video was shot with the approval of the Islamic State. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media website does not in anyway constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of any claims or statements made in this video.

ISIS functionaries claim to have introduced both Islamic courts and a functioning department of water management in Raqqa. In this video, several people can be seen at an ISIS-run Islamic sharia court. Interviewed plaintiffs say they are pleased with legal services provided under ISIS - which they consider fair and considerably better than what they experienced under the Syrian regime.

Footage also includes an interview with a functionary at the local department of water management. The official claims that his staff are purifying water and conducting studies to develop better provision of water.

TRANSCRIPT AND SHOTLIST

Wide of al-Dillah roundabout
Wide of propaganda billboards “God’s sharia should be the arbiter.” “The crusader against Islam.”
Wide of Al-Fawwaz Mosque
Wide of shops
Wide of children and man washing before prayer
Various of street food stands
Wide of two men eating
Wide of school girls walking
Wide of women and children in al-Rashid Park
Various of shops
Wide of military equipment store
Wide of fighter looking at fabrics
Wide of propaganda billboard “The traitors of Islam”
Wide of propaganda billboards that read: “Arab tyrants, your hands are tarnished with Muslims’ blood.” “The crusade against Islam.”
Wide of ISIS flag in the street
Various of preaching stand broadcasting Quranic recitation
Various of ISIS traffic police

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Ahmed, Water department official and ISIS member

01:53 – 02:37

"In the name of God and prayers be upon Prophet Mohammad. We, at the water department in Wilayat Raqqa [Raqqa Province], the Islamic State, are providing water for the common people. We are conducting repairs and mechanical works in all projects in Wilayat Raqqa. Water is being purified using chlorine and liquid hypochlorite then pumped in the grid. The water department follows up on complaints and technical failures, as well as applies necessary repairs in various workshops in Wilayat Raqqa. Finally, the Studies Department performs studies necessary for new projects to cover people’s current and future needs for water. Thanks be to God almighty. Peace be upon you.”

Wide of men’s entrance to Islamic court

Wide of women’s entrance to Islamic court
Various of men’s entrance to Islamic court

Various of people walking into court

Various of people sitting inside the court
Various of ISIS legal workers receiving files from plaintiffs
Various of court waiting room
Wide of ISIS legal worker handling files
Various of court waiting room
Various/ close-ups of legal documents

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Humam al-Ansari, legal worker at Islamic court run by ISIS
03:38 – 04:12
“In the name of God the Merciful the Compassionate, and God’s prayers be upon Prophet Mohamad and his family and companions. Thanks be to Good who enabled us to conquer these lands. Thanks be to God who enable us to establish these courts of law in Wilyat al-Raqqa [Name ISIS uses for Raqqa province].
Thanks be to God, we are fulfilling our work to grant all people their rights and correct any injustice that has befallen our Muslim brothers. Today, judges and everyone else are fulfilling their work to apply God’s sharia law. We treat people as our brethren.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mohamad al-Rashed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS

04:12 – 04:38

“Peace be upon you. We are before the Islamic court in the city of Raqqa. Thanks be to God, the treatment is very good. Under the regime, if someone wanted to come to the court he would have had to pay bribes. People with legitimate rights suffered injustice. This was always the case. Thanks be to God, at the present time, treatment cannot be any better. One’s rights have been reinstated, God willing. Your right will not be lost, even if you were entitled to something as small as a particle.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Munir Ahmed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS

04:39 – 05:20
“Thanks be to God almighty, I presented a case at the Islamic court in Wilyat Raqqa. Thanks be to God, there is cooperation on behalf of the judges and the other brothers. They understand people’s needs. Thanks be to God. I have a lawsuit that involves myself and another person. We resorted to God’s sharia law and the verdict has not been issued yet. Thanks be to God for everything.
Thanks be to God that we got rid of that infidel and debauched regime. Previously, if you were entitled to a right, you would be treated as a wrongdoer. One had to bribe judges and officials."

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ISIS Issues Resident ID Cards in Raqqa
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
14 Mar 2015

DISCLAIMER: This video was shot with the approval of the Islamic State. The appearance of these videos on the Transterra Media website does not in anyway constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of any claims or statements made in this video.

Video shows the civil status office in Raqqa, ISIS' biggest stronghold in Syria. Syrian citizens can be seen handing over their IDs issued by the Syrian government and receiving ones given to them by ISIS authorities. Ibrahim is applying for a birth certificate for his 1-year old son Sufian who, according to his father, was born when the Free Syrian Army was still in control of the city. At the time, government offices were closed and he was not able to obtain the proper documentation. Today he says that he is grateful that the “Islamic State” is reactivating government services.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of ISIS traffic police
Various of ISIS police (al-Hisba) vehicles broadcasting calls for prayer
Various of vehicle broadcasting ISIS anthem
Vaious of street food stands
Various of fighter carrying a rifle and a baby at the market
Various of people in park
Wide of ISIS’ Personal Status Office (PSO)
Various of people entering PSO to apply for IDs
Various of people applying for IDs
Close-ups of retrieved IDs issued by the Syrian government
Various of preparing new IDs
Close-up of personal status data displayed on computer
Various of entering data related to new IDs using computers
Various of people being given their new IDs
Various of Raqqa resident Khaled and his baby Sufian inside taxi on their way to PSO
Various of Khaled and his baby Sufian entering PSO
Various of ISIS employee filling in information for birth certificate
Various of man applying for birth certificate
Various of witness singing application
Various of witnesses signing application
Various of application process

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ibrahim, the father of baby Sufian whose birth certificate is being issued
04:16 – 04:52

“In the name of God the Merciful, the Compassionate. I had a newborn about a year ago. You can see him. He is about one year old. At that time, the Free Syrian Army was present and there were no government offices.
Thanks be to God, now that the Islamic State is present, government offices are being gradually activated. One of these departments is the Personal Status Office, where they [ISIS members] are registering newly born babies.”

Various of Khaled receiving birth certificate and leaving building
Various of street food stands
Wide of perfume shop
Various of shops
Various of al-Dalla Roundabout
Wide of men praying in the street
Wide of billboard calling people to pay Zaqat (Islamic alms)
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “Now… now… the fighting has come.”
Wide of street
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “There is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his messenger.”

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ISIS-Run Government Institutions in R...
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
14 Mar 2015

DISCLAIMER: This video was shot with the approval of the Islamic State. The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media website does not in any way constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of any claims or statements made in this video.

At the personal status office in Raqqa, ISIS' biggest stronghold in Syria, Syrian citizens can be seen handing over their IDs issued by the Syrian government and receiving ones given to them by ISIS authorities. Ibrahim is applying for a birth certificate for his one-year-old son Sufian who, according to his father, was born when the Free Syrian Army was still in control of the city. At the time, government offices were closed and he was not able to obtain the proper documentation. Today he says that he is grateful that the “Islamic State” is reactivating government services.
ISIS functionaries claim to have introduced both Islamic courts and a functioning department of water management in Raqqa. In this video, several people can be seen at an ISIS-run Islamic sharia court. Interviewed plaintiffs say they are pleased with legal services provided under ISIS - which they consider fair and considerably better than what they experienced under the Syrian regime.
Footage also includes an interview with a functionary at the local department of water management. The official claims that his staff are purifying water and conducting studies to develop better provision of water.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of streets
Various of fighter carrying a rifle and a baby at the market
Wide of mosque
Various of children, women and men in park
Wide of market
Various of street food stands
Wide of perfume shop
Wide of two men eating
Wide of schoolgirls walking
Wide of women and children in al-Rashid Park
Wide of vegetable shop
Wide of street food cart
Wide of military equipment store
Wide of jewelry store
Wide of fighter looking at fabrics
Wide of women in front shops
Wide of children and man washing before prayer
Various of women buying candy for children in park
Wide of armed man with children in park
Various of al-Dillah roundabout (coffee pot fountain)
Wide of men praying in the street
Wide of men’s entrance to Islamic court
Wide of women’s entrance to Islamic court
Various of men’s entrance to Islamic court
Various of people walking into court
Various of people sitting inside the court
Various of ISIS legal workers receiving files from plaintiffs
Various of court waiting room
Various of ISIS legal worker handling files
Various of court waiting room
Various/ close-ups of legal documents

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Humam al-Ansari, legal worker at Islamic court run by ISIS

03:29 – 04:02

“In the name of God the Merciful, the Compassionate, and God’s prayers be upon Prophet Mohamad and his family and companions. Thanks be to Good who enabled us to conquer these lands. Thanks be to God who enable us to establish these courts of law in Wilayat al-Raqqa [Name ISIS uses for Raqqa province]. Thanks be to God, we are fulfilling our work to grant all people their rights and correct any injustice that has befallen our Muslim brothers. Today, judges and everyone else are fulfilling their work to apply God’s sharia law. We treat people as our brethren.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mohamad al-Rashed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS
04:03 – 04:30
“Peace be upon you. We are before the Islamic court in the city of Raqqa. Thanks be to God, the treatment is very good. Under the regime, if someone wanted to come to the court he would have had to pay bribes. People with legitimate rights suffered injustice. This was always the case. Thanks be to God, at the present time, treatment cannot be any better. One’s rights have been reinstated, God willing. Your right will not be lost, even if you were entitled to something as small as a particle.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Munir Ahmed, plaintiff at Islamic court run by ISIS

04:31 – 05:11

“Thanks be to God almighty, I presented a case at the Islamic court in Wilayat Raqqa. Thanks be to God, there is cooperation on behalf of the judges and the other brothers. They understand people’s needs. Thanks be to God. I have a lawsuit that involves myself and another person. We resorted to God’s sharia law and the verdict has not been issued yet. Thanks be to God for everything. Thanks be to God that we got rid of that infidel and debauched regime. Previously, if you were entitled to a right, you would be treated as a wrongdoer. One had to bribe judges and officials."

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Ahmed, Water department official and ISIS member

05:12 – 05:55

"In the name of God and prayers be upon Prophet Mohammad. We, at the water department in Wilayat Raqqa [Raqqa Province], the Islamic State, are providing water for the common people. We are conducting repairs and mechanical works in all projects in Wilayat Raqqa. Water is being purified using chlorine gas and liquid hypochlorite then pumped in the grid. The water department follows up on complaints and technical failures, as well as applies necessary repairs in various workshops in Wilayat Raqqa. Finally, the Studies Department performs studies necessary for new projects to cover people’s current and future needs for water. Thanks be to God almighty. Peace be upon you.”

Wide of Clock Tower square
Wide of Raqqa and large ISIS flag
Wide of propaganda billboards that read: “Arab tyrants, your hands are tarnished with Muslims’ blood.” “The crusade against Islam.”
Wide of roundabout and ISIS flags
Wide of billboard calling people to pay Zakat (Islamic alms)
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “Now… now… the fighting has come.”
Wide of street
Various of loudspeaker in ISIS preaching office broadcasting Quran
Wide of propaganda billboard “The traitors of Islam”
Wide of roundabout
Wide of propaganda billboards “God’s sharia should be the arbiter.” “The crusader against Islam.”
Wide of propaganda billboard that reads: “There is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his messenger.”
Various of ISIS police (al-Hisba) vehicles broadcasting calls for prayer
Various of vehicle broadcasting ISIS anthem
Various of ISIS traffic police
Wide of ISIS-run Personal Status Office (PSO)
Various of people entering PSO to apply for IDs
Various of people applying for IDs
Various of ISIS employees entering data related to new IDs using computers
Close-ups of IDs issued by the Syrian government
Various of ISIS employees preparing new IDs
Close-up of personal status data displayed on computer
Various of people being given their new IDs
Various of Raqqa resident Ibrahim and his baby Sufian inside taxi on their way to PSO
Various of Ibrahim and his baby Sufian entering PSO
Various of ISIS employee filling in information for birth certificate
Various of Ibrahim applying for birth certificate
Various of witness singing application
Wide of baby Sufian
Wide of Ibrahim signing application

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ibrahim, the father of baby Sufian whose birth certificate is being issued

10:32 – 11:08
“In the name of God the Merciful, the Compassionate. I had a newborn about a year ago. You can see him. He is about one year old. At that time, the Free Syrian Army was present and there were no government offices. Thanks be to God, now that the Islamic State is present, government offices are being gradually activated. One of these departments is the Personal Status Office, where they [ISIS members] are registering newly born babies.”

Various of Khaled receiving birth certificate and leaving building
Various of street food stands

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My Son's Birth, Through my Lens
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By George Nickels
27 Dec 2014

If you’re a man in Cambodia, being present at the birth of your child is widely frowned upon. As both the prospective father and a camera-wielding photo-journalist, attending and documenting the birth of my son was a challenge, to say the least.

At 8pm on 26 December 2014, my partner of nearly nine years alerted me that her water had broken. She started to have her first contractions, but we were advised to stay home, get some food and rest, and wait it out until the morning.

By 7am and after a sleepless night, the intensity of Madeline’s contractions reached a peak every ten minutes; it was time to leave. Descending seven flights of stairs from our apartment in Phnom Penh, we hailed a remork (tuk tuk) to take us across the city on a journey that would change our lives forever. As is common in the capital city, the driver said he knew where to go, (which meant no, I don’t, please tell me), so with the limited Khmer that I knew, and ten minutes trying to explain where the clinic was, we came to an agreement and departed.

For twenty minutes, in a rickety wooden carriage towed by a 125cc motorcycle, on substandard roads, we careered through early morning city traffic on with Madeline panting heavily all the way to the clinic. On arrival, Doctors and midwives monitored the baby’s heartbeat, and then lead us to the room that we had pre booked, ready for Madeline to start the first stages of labour.

For the next four hours, the intensity in the room increased tenfold; I watched as the midwives coached Madeline with every technique in the book to ease her pain and mental state. Encouraging deep breathing and keeping her calm was part of my support role .When the staff decided she was ready, my partner told me to grab my camera. She was screaming as they wheeled her upstairs to the delivery room, and I realized I was about to begin documenting the birth of my son.

From a photographer’s point of view, taking photographs of my woman giving birth was not easy. She was in a lot of discomfort and pain, so trying document this, whilst retaining her dignity, was both mentally and physically draining.

There were other factors I had to take into consideration. Room to move was at a premium; I was in a small delivery room with six medical staff and a pregnant woman, so gaining the trust of the midwives and doctors was essential. Lighting conditions were very harsh, and Madeline was constantly moving from one chair to another, from standing to sitting, and from crouching and crawling positions.

The majority of the time I was supporting my partner and wishing for a safe and problem free delivery, and she says she can only recall one moment of me taking photographs from the entire labour. Madeline was having very heavy contractions whilst kneeling on the floor on her hands and knees. My natural instinct as a photographer kicked in, and as I lay on my back in front of her, pointing the camera at her pain stricken face, I composed the frame and took the photograph. This was the only point in the delivery when my partner told me to stop taking photos and to hold her hands!

The images shown were taken in the last three hours of a fairly short seven-hour natural labour, and at 1.50 p.m. on the 27th of December, we were blessed with our first son, Frank Nickels.

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Abandoned Children in Bulgaria
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
29 Sep 2014

Bulgaria is one of the countries in the world most affected by the abandonment of children. Every year, 2,000 babies are placed in state institutions, while over 7,000 infants and teenagers live without parents. This practice of abandoning children is a by-product of the family policy in the countries that were part of the Soviet Union. In these countries, the state or "homeland" acted as the surrogate mother for abandoned children and took care of families. As a result, thousands of children in Bulgaria have grown up without proper care and affection. The shocking images of the Rumanian orphanages in the eighties opened the eyes of the authorities and public opinion about these child prisons. In 2009, a BBC report showing wild children in Bulgaria fighting for food and living in terrible conditions greatly upset the population. Over the last few years, NGOs, the European Union, and Unicef have mobilized in an effort to close these orphanages. The state of Bulgaria also decided on a national plan to close the institutions. The authorities made a commitment to provide alternative housing and care for these children, which involves developing a network of host families, facilitating adoption processes, helping the biological families financially to encourage them to keep their children, and creating small institutions to help handicapped children (42 % of the abandoned children suffer from a disability). But what really needs addressing is the causes behind the high level of abandonment. Poverty, lack of access to healthcare (among the Roma minority in particular), poor sexual education, and the high price and inaccessibility of contraceptives are all issues that contribute to the problem. This is a colossal challenge for the poorest country in the European Union, compounded by corruption. Another angle to the story: ‘Mothers in Chains’ After being abandoned, the child has to grow up without a mother. Placed in an institution, they are surrounded by women who will give them care and affection. Nurses, nannies, volunteers and, in the best cases, a family assistant if there is placement in host family or foster mother if they are lucky enough to be adopted. To make up for the absence of the biological mother, surrogate mothers' chain is going to be set up. Who are these women who devote themselves to taking care of these abandoned children? How do they work? What are the aftereffects on the children after having so many different maternal relationships?

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IMG_5425.jpg
Shumen
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A nurse plays with two children in the garden of Shumen Institution, the oldest institution in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

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Abandoned Children 13
Shumen, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

Shumen Institution is the oldest one in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

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Abandoned Children 12
Targovishte, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
01 Jul 2014

Zlatka Rizaeva, a nurse at the Turghovist Institution, takes care of a young disabled boy in the room where all the seven disabled children sleep at the institution.
As Rizaeva introduces us to the seven children, a girl holds on her two legs. Others spend their days sleeping, coiled in their colored sheets, sometimes unable to move. "It is very hard this work with them," admits Rizaeva. "They need a lot of care. And then, our job is often depreciated. People have difficulty understanding our everyday life here. They do not think of the many positive things this kind of institution offers."

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Life Along The Railway (20 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

A baby boy is sleeping inside a makeshift home next to the railway tracks.

Space is scarce in Dhaka, Bangladesh’s vibrant capital. So is money. An estimated number of more than 10 million people live in Dhaka, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Poor neighborhoods, by western definitions called slums, are continuously growing. The space next to railway tracks has long been occupied by numerous makeshift homes.

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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
15 Jun 2013

A toddler stands before a make-shift walkway into the uncompleted building occupied by homeless and jobless people in the oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

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Nigeria Oil Theft (6 of 25)
Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
18 May 2013

A child has his bath in the Deibou community area of Bayelsa state near Nun river in the oil-rich Niger Delta. Thousands of people live on less than $1 per day, despite the fact that the Niger Delta ranks as the seventh-largest oil producing nation in the world.

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Chavez Followers Attend Maduro's Swea...
Caracas, Venezuela
By Sergio Alvarez
20 Apr 2013

A young child is seen wearing apparel allusive to party politics and Venezuela's revolutionary process.

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Life In The Graves - La Vie Dans Les ...
Shanshrah, Idlib province, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

A baby infected by leishmania, a skin disease that is passed on by an insect that looks like a big mosquito and is devastating this rural region. It provokes red stings which attack the skin. Before the revolution, an insecticide was spread in order to kill the insect. No humanitarian organization is supporting the sick people.

Bébé atteint de la leishmaniose. Cette maladie de peau transmise par un insecte ressemblant à un gros moustique fait des ravages dans cette région rurale. Il provoque des boutons qui rongent la peau. Avant la révolution, un insecticide était diffusé pour éradiquer l'insecte. Aucune organisation humanitaire ne vient en aide aux malades.

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Azaz Refugee Camp
Azaz, Syria
By LeeHarper
01 Mar 2013

Mohammed has four sons and four daughters. He used to work in Aleppo in a crisp factory, but the factory and his house have been destroyed by the regime. He now lives in a tent with his family of ten. The refugee camp holds approximately 10,000 refugees, with a remaining 2000 waiting to get in. The camp currently cannot cope with the massive influx of people, where disease is rife due to a shortage of international aid.

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Health in Uganda (3 o...
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda-March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a baby girl just born in Luweero general hospital.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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Growing Up In Jordan
Amman, Jordan
By Melissa Tabeek
29 May 2012

Tanym, 4 months old, lives in a small, 2-room apartment with 10 other family members in Amman, Jordan.

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Life in Malawi 16
Blantyre, Southern Region, Malawi
By Arjen van de Merwe
26 Nov 2011

Breastfeeding in public is nothing unusual in Zingwangwa, but being photographed during the act might be.
Zingwangwa is a low to middle income township of Blantyre, the biggest commercial city of Malawi.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Taleb is laying on a couple of mattresses in a Bedouin camp in the desert. The Bedouins in this area have many children. A lot of men have two wives and upwards of twenty children.