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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
27 Mar 2013

The wife of Mr Ali Mahmoud Muhammad Empties their collection fo empty med-boxes on a carpet

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
27 Mar 2013

8 year old aunt of Aram Karim Hama Hussein and Ana Karim Hama Hussein.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
27 Mar 2013

Sheena Fathalla with help in her mother's arms. She was born blind (24 Feb 2010) She was immediatly diagnosed Hydrocephalus, a medical condition in which there is an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the ventricles, or cavities, of the brain, causing increased pressure inside the skull. She's unable to walk, but she might be able to have surgery at the age of 14.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
27 Mar 2013

Nermin Hama, Hamin Masoon, Sartak Hama Nazim Sardas Fathallago go back to the bomb shelter where they hid in 1988 during the attack. People who survived managed to stay in bomb shelters all day and afterwards had to flee to Iran as the city was no longer safe to live in.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
25 Mar 2013

Arish Aziz Ali (boy) was born with a congenital malformation of the right foot. He can walk, however the right leg is shorter than the other.
Jian Aziz Ali, 25. She was born the day of the attack on 16 March 1988. She studies Sport Education at the Halabja University and plays volleyball in the Halabja city team.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
27 Feb 2013

On Saturday men are walking in the city center of Halabja. Passerby at dusk.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
27 Feb 2013

Five Peshmerga, Kurdish guerrilla fighters fighting for an independent Kurdistan, pose for a group portrait in the military headquarters of Halabja.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
27 Feb 2013

A picture of Loqman Abdulkader Mohammad the day of the attack. He lost his entire family and survived. He is now 42.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
25 Feb 2013

Alande Hameed Hama Ali, 11, is affected by Leukemia; she was diagnosed at the age of 6. His mother was in the center of Halabja in her house when the attck on the city occured, she then fled to Iran seeking refuge, like many others. She had 7 miscarriages.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
25 Feb 2013

Mr. Baker's back. He was in Halabja the day of the attack, when the gas cleared out he helped around the city. Most of his body is affected by a skin condition. This is very common among the survivors.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
24 Feb 2013

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

Halabja. View of the city and the eastern hills and mountain range towards Iran.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
23 Feb 2013

One of the shells that hit Halabja the day of the attack. The empties of the shell have became a permanent istallation at the Memorial of the Halabja Gas attack that occured on 16/3/1988.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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Kurdish And Arab fighters
Aleppo, Syria
By pathilsman
01 Dec 2012

Fighters from a mixed Kurdish/Arab FSA battalion

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Kurds on Hunger Strike in Turkey
ISTANBUL, TURKEY
By Jodi Hilton
14 Nov 2012

Kurdish activists hold candles during a vigil in a park in the Okmeydani district of Istanbul. After thousands of Kurdish political prisoners staged a hunger strike, they were joined by friends, relatives and supporters. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Minorities in Georgia (31 of 37)
Tbsili, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
13 Oct 2012

Residents of Abanotubani (Bath District), one of Tbilisi's oldest districts, enjoy tea at a local chaikhana. The Abanotubani chaikhanas have long become a symbol of ethnic tolerance. Here you can easily see Armenians, Azerbaijanis, Kurds, and Georgians sipping tea at one table, discussing local news, and planning common business.

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Minorities in Georgia (37 of 37)
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
12 Oct 2012

Residents of one of Tbilisi's oldest districts Abanotubani (Bath District) play backgammon next to the dome of one of the baths. Keram Rashoev (left-most), a 46-year-old an ethnic Kurd and a local backgammon legend, says that in Abanotubani there are no ethnic differences and people treat each other based on the deeds, not a blood. "Politicians come and go, but in this district human relations remain the same," comments Rashoev on whether the politics can influence people's attitude towards in other. Tbilisi, 2012

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The people of the Kurdish village Bes...
Bestasos, Derik, Syria
By benjaminhiller
19 Jul 2012

The people of the Kurdish village Bestastos in Northeast Syria attend a ceremony for the opening of a Kurdish cultural center. Under the rule of Assad teaching Kurdish culture and language was forbidden. But now in many Kurdish dominated parts in Syria the Regime forces where driven out by non violent actions.

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The people of the Kurdish village Bes...
Bestasos, Derik, Syria
By benjaminhiller
19 Jul 2012

The people of the Kurdish village Bestastos in Northeast Syria attend a ceremony for the opening of a Kurdish cultural center. Under the rule of Assad teaching Kurdish culture and language was forbidden. But now in many Kurdish dominated parts in Syria the Regime forces where driven out by non violent actions.

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The people of the Kurdish village Bes...
Bestasos, Derik, Syria
By benjaminhiller
19 Jul 2012

The people of the Kurdish village Bestastos in Northeast Syria attend a ceremony for the opening of a Kurdish cultural center. Under the rule of Assad teaching Kurdish culture and language was forbidden. But now in many Kurdish dominated parts in Syria the Regime forces where driven out by non violent actions.

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The people of the Kurdish village Bes...
Bestasos, Derik, Syria
By benjaminhiller
19 Jul 2012

The people of the Kurdish village Bestastos in Northeast Syria attend a ceremony for the opening of a Kurdish cultural center. Under the rule of Assad teaching Kurdish culture and language was forbidden. But now in many Kurdish dominated parts in Syria the Regime forces where driven out by non violent actions.

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Kurdish Nomads (18 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
12 May 2011

Women stand near their tent at a nomadic camp near Idil in Southeastern Turkey. They are members of a shepherd family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (13 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
12 May 2011

Nomadic Kurdish girls rest on a hand made wool-felted blanket near their camp. They are members of a nomadic family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (15 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
12 May 2011

At a nomadic camp near Idil in Southeastern Turkey, a woman makes traditional flatbread. She is a member of a shepherd family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (16 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
12 May 2011

At a nomadic camp near Idil in Southeastern Turkey, a woman makes traditional flatbread while her son stands nearby. She is a member of a shepherd family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (9 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
12 May 2011

A nomadic Kurdish shepherd gathers his flock, preparing for the next leg of migration. He is a member of a nomadic family that treks around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (10 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
12 May 2011

A nomadic Kurdish shepherd sorts animals as he helps prepare for the next leg of his family's migration. He is a member of a nomadic family that travels around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (7 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
12 May 2011

Kurdish nomads gather to plan the next leg of their trek. They are members of a nomadic family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (14 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
12 May 2011

A nomadic Kurdish carrying goat kids in her satchel is a member of a nomadic family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (12 of 27)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
12 May 2011

The hand-embroidered satchel of nomadic Kurdish shepherd. He is a member of a nomadic family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (17 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
12 May 2011

At a nomadic camp near Idil in Southeastern Turkey, dough for traditional flatbread is prepared by a member of a shepherd family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (4 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
12 May 2011

A nomadic Kurdish boy goes to fetch water. He is a member of a nomadic family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (21 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
11 May 2011

A child lies among blankets and other supplies as Kurdish nomads prepare for their next leg of their journey through Southeastern Turkey. They are members of a nomadic family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (20 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
11 May 2011

At a nomadic camp near Idil in Southeastern Turkey, a family gathers for breakfast before migrating to the next camp. They are members of a shepherd family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (19 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
11 May 2011

At a nomadic camp near Idil in Southeastern Turkey, a woman disassembles her family's tent and packs up their supplies before migrating to the next camp. She is a member of a shepherd family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON

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Kurdish Nomads (1 of 27)
Idil, Turkey
By Jodi Hilton
11 May 2011

A Kurdish shepherd and patriarch of a nomadic family that migrates around Southeastern Turkey during the spring, summer and fall seasons in order to graze sheep and goats. PHOTO BY JODI HILTON