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UN Aid delivered in Homs, Syria 01
Homs
By عمر عمر
26 Oct 2016

United Nations aid is brought to a besieged neighborhood in Homs, Syria. ادخال المساعدات الى حي الوعر الذي تحاصره قوات الأسد في محافظة حمص بسوريا

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UN Aid delivered in Homs, Syria 02
Homs
By عمر عمر
26 Oct 2016

United Nations aid is brought to a besieged neighborhood in Homs, Syria. ادخال المساعدات الى حي الوعر الذي تحاصره قوات الأسد في محافظة حمص بسوريا

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UN Aid delivered in Homs, Syria 03
Homs
By عمر عمر
26 Oct 2016

United Nations aid is brought to a besieged neighborhood in Homs, Syria. ادخال المساعدات الى حي الوعر الذي تحاصره قوات الأسد في محافظة حمص بسوريا

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UN Aid delivered in Homs, Syria 04
Homs
By عمر عمر
26 Oct 2016

United Nations aid is brought to a besieged neighborhood in Homs, Syria. ادخال المساعدات الى حي الوعر الذي تحاصره قوات الأسد في محافظة حمص بسوريا

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Sunni Kurd Minorities Take Refuge in ...
Homs, Syria
By TTM Contributor 8
09 Jun 2016

June 9, 2016
Homs, Syria

Kurdish Sunni minorities of Akrad Dasneh, a small town in north-eastern Homs, have been kicked out of their hometown encircled by towns predominated by Alawites loyal to the Assad regime.
Hundreds of families are now distributed among Ghanto and neighboring towns in rural Homs. They are taking refuge in buildings mainly used for cattle and goats.
Abu Ibrahim, his mother and his family have fled their home in Akrad Dasneh and had to relocate several times. The family is now sheltering in one of these barns under miserable living conditions.

00:59 Abu Ibrahim
“We are Kurds of Dasneh. We used to live with other Alawite residents loyal to Assad regime. They put pressure on us and shot at our homes. They also killed two of our young men and kidnapped some others. Residents loyal to Assad regime joined the fights in central Homs and the neighboring areas, and some of their men got killed in the clashes so they used to come after us for revenge. We are minorities and we were force to flee our homes. It’s been four years now and out situation is getting worse. Everything is expensive and the Russian airstrikes hit non-stop. We keep on moving from one place to another.”

01:47 Abu Ibrahim
“The kids eat thyme and goat very often, sometimes we don’t even have bread. We cannot afford to buy bread; it coasts between 300 SYP (1.4 USD) and 500 SYP (2.3 USD). In Ramadan we fast all day and when it’s time to eat we have almost nothing, no food. Women who are supposed to fast are also breast-feeding their babies and they should be having enough food and nutrition to produce enough milk for the babies.”

02:30 Abu Ibrahim
“We are here sheltering in stores with cattle. Just behind this shelter there are cows and sheep. The kids here are suffering from asthma and respiration problems because of the smell. We live in miserable conditions. Look here how can this shelter be an isolation tool. If I could remove it you could see the cattle right behind us.. The babies one month and two months old are suffering from asthma because of these conditions.”

03:28 Hassan
Q: “What are you lacking?”
A: “We are lacking everything, we need clothing we need everything.. We used to go to public guarding and playgrounds, now it’s impossible because of the shelling. We used to go to school, but now we cannot go anymore.
Q: “What is that you need the most?”
A: “Clothing.. School.. Everything.”

04:26 Aisha
“We don’t have enough food. Thank God we are alive. We only seek God’s mercy.. May God bless you.. He wanted us to be here. We thank him for everything.”

05:08 Um Ibrahim
“We are Kurds of Dasneh. We used to live with people loyal to Assad regime in our hometown, but they were pressuring us and forced us to leave our homes. We fled at night with our kids and here we are it’s been four years and we are still away from our homes. You can see our living conditions. We have to keep relocating from place to another. We are barely receiving one meal per day and it’s insufficient for us and our children. No one is looking after us it’s been four years. The children can’t even play they sit here with us all day in the stores. It’s been four years. Where shall we go? We were kicked out of our homes and lands. Where shall we go?"

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Aid for Besieged Syrian Town
Rastan
By TTM Contributor 8
21 Apr 2016

A large truck convoy has delivered humanitarian aid supplies to the Syrian opposition-held town of Rastan under siege in central Homs Province. The 65 truck convoy is sponsored by the UN, The International Committee of the Red Cross and and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent.
The ICRC says the convoy is the first to reach Rastan in over a year.
The supplies include food, medicine and medical equipment, electricity generators and water treatment materials.
Opposition officials say Syrian regime forces did not allow a large portion of the medical supplies including medications and vaccines mainly for children.
The town, which has been under siege for three years, has seen its population double to 120-thousand because of people fleeing fighting in the region.

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The Destruction of Homs
Homs
By yazan1985
03 Mar 2015

Photos from Homs in March 2014 show the destruction of Syria's third largest city toward the end of the three-year siege (May 2011 - May 2014).  

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Inside the Last Rebel Bastion of Homs
Homs, Syria
By Mohannad
27 Oct 2014

Hay al-Waer, Homs, Syria
October 27, 2014

Children and adults in the besieged suburb of Hay al-Waer, one of the last neighborhoods in Homs to remain under opposition control, show their defiance in the face of aerial bombardment and deprivation. Children hold signs sending messages of peace to the world and adults express their frustration at what they feel is their abandonment at the hands of the international community. Their messages emphasize a disdain for violence and the desire for education and a better, more peaceful world.

Shot List:

00:00 – 00:06
Pan left movement shows two young girls running around near partially destroyed houses.

00:07 – 00:12

Medium shot shows the same girls playing with a cat.

00:13— 00:47

A small number of civilians stand on both sides of the road. Children wearing colored paper hats hold cardboard banners.

The banners, written in Arabic, read:

“The Civil Assembly in Homs – the Administrative Committee; Freedom Race; Hay al-Waer.” “UN Security Council Resolution 2153 ?????” “Our children are without shelter, without protection.” “Together we build international civilization” (written in English). “For the price of a rocket, build a school, a hospital or an orphanage.”

00:33 – 01:46

More young children stand on the roadside holding protest banners. The banners read:

“We are being killed with the weapons of the regime, 'Halesh' [a derogatory term for Hezbollah that echoes Daesh, the Arabic acronym for ISIS] and the [US-lead international] coalition.”

“In our concentration camp, we love life.”

“We still stand together, we get our freedom” (written in English).

“For the price of a bullet, buy a pen.”

“Our children are the children of humanity – don’t forget” (written in English).

02:22 – 02:47

Pan right movement shows partially destroyed buildings in the distance.

03:21 – 03:32
Pan right movement inside a house shows heavy destruction. Rubble and wrecked furniture cover the floor.

03:33 – 03:46
Pan right movement inside a house shows a hole in the wall and torn curtains.

Interviews

00:48 – 01:32 (Two men, Arabic):

“This is where the airplane bombed this morning. This building is full of civilians, from top to bottom. They are all refugees.

Look at the rabbits – even rabbits were not safe from Bashar al-Assad! He killed them all.”

The same man holds dead rabbits by the ears, saying sarcastically:

“These were carrying weapons and standing on the frontline.”

Another man holds two other dead rabbits:

“Oh dear Lord! This is a mother and her offspring.”

He goes on, mocking the regime’s propaganda about fighters receiving aid from foreign countries:
“This one is from Qatar, and this one from Saudi Arabia – they sent them to us. Arab countries will also send us chicks, but they still haven’t arrived.”

The cameraman replies sarcastically: “The [rabbits’] mother is from Turkey.”

01:47 – 02:21 (Man, Arabic. Intermittent shelling can be heard in the background.)

“We have been under siege in Hay al-Waer for more than a year. The Prophet, peace be upon him, migrated only once. We migrated three times; the first time we left Khalidiya [a neighborhood in Homs], the second time we were displaced from al-Jazira al-Sabi’a and the third time from al-Jazira al-Sadisa after we were bombed by warplanes today.

We call upon Muslims – we call upon God first and then Muslims – and say that we are under siege here in Hay al-Waer. We do not have a grain of salt. You have to understand this – not even a grain of salt. We hope for help from God first and then Muslims.”

02:48 – 03:20 (Man, Arabic. A Heavily destroyed building can be seen in the background)

“We have been under siege for a year and a half. The Assad regime is following a policy of starvation and bombing that Israel uses. [The regime] is laying siege on the refugees in Hay al-Waer. It bombed us with explosive barrels and missiles. There is no doubt that [the regime] is implementing an Israeli policy. Israel used to bomb refugees in Gaza and other areas with explosive barrels. We are tired of calling upon the world to help us, because no one is doing anything for us.”

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Migrant's Video Captures Perilous Med...
Mediterranean Sea
By mchreyteh
01 Sep 2014

The Mediterranean Sea
September 1, 2014

A Syrian refugee captures with his mobile phone a perilous clandestine journey to Europe and the hardship faced by the illegal migrants before they were rescued by a tanker.

It all starts with the refugees being herded into apartments, that the smuggler has rented, in a poor neighborhood of Alexandria. Walid (not the character’s real name), a 31-year-old from Homs, managed to get himself into Lebanon, from where he was able to board a flight to Cairo. Luckily he had a valid passport.

A few days later the smuggler gives the signal that it’s time to move. Under the cover of darkness, Walid and over one hundred refugees, from Syria and other countries, walk for two hours until they reach the seafront. They were divided into four small fishing boats and drove for five hours, before reaching two larger fishing boats onto which they were transferred.

The two boats sailed side-by-side for three days until they reached an old ferry. The 250 refugees, including many women and children, were told that this boat would take them to Italy. After four days at sea, they were running out of food and water. Some refugees got seasick.

Walid and other men confronted the captain after finding out that he was woefully inexperienced at driving a boat. He was relying on calls from the human trafficking gang, on his satellite phone, to give him directions. The satellite phone was broken in the fighting and the boat was then lost at sea.

It took the captain a day and a half to fix the satellite phone, by which time the refugees were hungry, thirsty, and exhausted. At night they saw a light in the distance from a ship heading to Spain. This meant that they had still not reached Italian waters. As the two boats passed each other, the crew on the boat headed to Spain must have caught sight of the refugees because they called the International Red Cross who told them to give the refugees water and food. After doing this the boat sailed on.

In the morning the boat with refugees set sail again but a storm broke. One of the engines broke down and people started panicking and screaming. They saw a large boat and started trying to call it over with a torch signal. After about three hours the crew of the large boat decided to take the refugees to Sicily where the Italian authorities conducted physical examinations, and separated them according to nationality.

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Syrian Presidential Election in Photos
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

A group of women cast their votes at a polling station in the al-Andalus school, Homs.

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Government-Held Homs Votes in Syrian ...
Homs
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

June 3, 2014
Homs, Syria

Residents in the Government-Held city of Homs cast their ballots in the Syrian presidential election at a polling station in al-Baath University.

Speakers:

Fatima Hussein, head of polling station:
"Since the early morning, ever since we got to the polling station ready to vote, large numbers of people came to the polling station. This is a huge rebuttal to all the enemies of Syria who are fighting us. This huge turnout came to vote for the new president of Syria who will lead us to the safety and security and help us rebuild Syria".

Mohamad al-Nasri, "Syria Lovers Youths" Spokesperson:
"We came here today to join this national celebration. We are convinced that we are going to vote for President Bashar al-Assad to renew his presidency because he is our leader here in Syria. We are also, as young adults, working here in the polling station to organize the election and ease the voting process. We are very happy on this day because we truly consider it a national celebration".

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Government-Held Homs Votes in Syrian ...
Homs, Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
03 Jun 2014

June 3, 2014
Homs, Syria

Residents in the Government-Held city of Homs cast their ballots in the Syrian presidential election at a polling station in the al-Baath University.

Mohamad Moussa (Resident):
“I came here to vote for the right president, the one who will help us against terrorism, the one who rebuild Syria and who make us feel secure. We should all vote, it is a right for every citizen and I wish they would let our little children vote because it is a right. This is a celebration and a victory for Syria which proved to the whole world that it is strong and resistant. We want a president who is a fighter, who is strong and able to return security to Syria”.

Imad Ali (Residnet):
“We are the citizens of Homs and we are here to participate in this public celebration because it is real democracy and we want to teach the whole world that in Syria there is true democracy. While they [the world] lack the simplest means of democracy, we participate in this public celebration because we want a unified Syria governed by president Bashar al-Assad. Syria is facing the imperial system and we will participate in the election because Syrians taught pride, resilience and democracy to the world”.

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Homs Residents Express Intentions to ...
Homs
By TTM Contributor 4
01 Jun 2014

June 1, 2014
Homs, Syria

Residents in government-held Homs neighborhood of Nuzha express their intention to vote for Bashar al-Assad in the Syrian presidential election. Footage also includes b-roll of street life and shots of street signs and posters of Bashar al-Assad.

Speakers:

Ali Waari, Businessman
"Dr. Bashar Al Assad is the one protecting Syria from chaos and division. He is the only one who can assure Syria's progress. We ask the Syrian people to vote and resist with their ballots and take responsibility [for their country]."

May Ibrahim, Employee in Print Factory
"The President [Bashar al-Assad] is truly the pride of this nation. The elections will determine everything and prove to the world that the President is the people’s choice. He is the solution to this problem [the war] and hopefully this country will go back to what it was under the leadership of President Bashar al-Assad."

Ouday, Employee in Print Factory
"Bashar al-Assad is the only hope for the people and the one who will stop the bloodbath and all of this will end with a new presidential term. He is our only hope, our salvation, our only choice and he will hopefully lead forever."

Nazih, Resident
"The elections taking place are a victory for Syria. It is the biggest victory for elections to take place in the middle of these events [the war]. Hundreds of countries conspired against Syria and hundreds of martyrs gave their lives so these elections could take place. It is the biggest victory for elections to take place in the middle of these events."

Hussein, Resident
"These elections are the only way out of this crisis we are in. The sacrifice of the armed forces and the National Defense Forces is the only way out of this crisis. Ninety percent of people will participate in the election to support President Bashar al-Assad."

Ahmad, Resident
"On Tuesday, the third of the month, we are going to vote because it is our right. We will vote for who will lead the country into progress, democracy and prosperity. Hopefully this country will become better then before."

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Syrian Army Advancing in Homs
Syria, Homs
By Transterra Editor
19 Apr 2014

Photos taken on April 19, 2014 in Wadi al Sayeh, Homs.

Shows damaged buildings, army vehicles and soldiers in Wadi al Sayeh, the last neighborhood before entering the old city of Homs which is held by Syrian rebels.

Syrian state television claims success by the Syrian Army and the National Defense Force militias in entering the Old City of Homs.
However opposition activists say government forces were able to force the rebels out of "Wadi al Sayeh" neighborhood but were unable to take control of the area and enter the old city.

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Father Frans Van Der Lugt Grave
Homs
By Transterra Editor
10 Apr 2014

The grave yard where Father Frans Van Der Lugt was burried.

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Father Frans Van Der Lugt Grave
Homs
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

Nazem one of twenty-three other christians that are still living in the Jesuit monastery in the besieged old city of Homs, putting flowers on the grave of father Frans Van Der Lugt.

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Father France Van Der Lugt Grave
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

Pictures shot on April 9, 2014, of the grave of the Dutch Priest Father Frans Van Der Lugt, in the Jesuit Monastery in the old city of Homs.
Father Frans was assassinated on Monday, April 7, when an unknown masked gunman shot him in the head in the monastery according to Mazhar, one of the monastery inhabitants who witnessed the assassination
Father Frans Van Der Lugt refused to leave Homs during the February evacuation and stayed with the remaining Christian inhabitants.

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Homs Under Siege
Homs, Syria
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

Man collecting wood from under the rubble of destroyed buildings. Homs has been under siege by the Syrian Army for almost two years. the wood is used for heating and cooking because of the absence of fuel.

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Homs: Syrian Government Controlled Area
Homs, Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
09 Apr 2014

Location: Homs, Syria
Slug: Normal life in neighborhoods controlled by Syrian regime, Humanitarian aid being distributed to pro-government families, rebels-held devastated areas
Duration: 05’ 32”
Sound/Language: Natural/Arabic
Source: TransTerra media
Restrictions: TransTerra Media clients
Dateline: Feb/2nd/2014

Shotlist:

  1. Wide of Syrian Arab Red Crescent centre in a pro-government area in Homs, UN and SARC vehicles parked there
  2. Med of UNHCR and SARC vehicles parked outside the centre
  3. Two med shots of food materials being delivered to resident of Ikrima neighborhood in Homs
  4. Med of sunflower oil box at a SARC centre while distributing food to the resident, reading on the box in arabic: World Food Program
  5. Med of SARC storehouse full of boxes and rice bags and two workers are carrying them out
  6. Close of a box reading in both Arabic and English: World Food Program; sunflower oil; fortified with vitamins A&D
  7. Wide of people looking for their names in lists pasted on the wall of SARC center
  8. Pan from lists of names of the families to people enqueued at a window of SARC centre
  9. Wide of people inline at the door of SARC centre
  10. Med of children standing beside their families inline at SARC centre
  11. Pan from a sign reading: Syrian Arab Red Crescent, Branch of Homs, Ikrima point to people in queue at the door of the center
  12. Med of a woman searching a list on a wall for her name
  13. Pan of blankets and boxes of aid inside a SARC storeroom
  14. Pan of a worker at SARC center coming out a storeroom carrying a box and handing to an elderly man
  15. Med of WFP members talking in SARC center
  16. Med of SARC members inside the center
  17. Med of SARC members checking documents at a SARC center
  18. street of Ikrima neighborhood in one of the government-held areas in Homs
  19. Med of people walking along pavement in Ikrima
  20. Two shots of streets in government-held Homs
  21. (FOX POPS)(arabic) man on the street, no name given
    “ As you can see, things are so good here, people are shopping, look at the sandwiches shops, and all shops are functioning well, thank God, and all are happy. But remains the shells that are falling. It costs us a lot of martyrs, and cause a lot of material damages. It’s all coming from down there.”
  22. Med of people walking along pavement while other are stopping at shops
  23. (FOX POPS)(arabic) man on the street, no name given
    “ We are in Ikrima neighborhood, the Pyramids str. Thank God; things are fine, excellent. All people are in their shops as you can see; all are working. Rockets and shells are the only thing that is frightening people. In a moment you can see people in the street, and all of a sudden all disappear, they run to their houses and do not get back to their normal life in a couple of days.”
  24. wide of a street in al-Nazha government-held neighborhood
  25. (FOX POPS)(arabic) man on the street, no name given
    “ We are now in al-Nazha neighborhood, we are living a very normal life, all materials are available and there no problems, but sometimes we get worry of the shells that fell. But life, services and living is so fine and all is available here”
  26. Med of pavement and people walking
  27. GV of Old Homs square, filmed from a high building in the government-controlled area
  28. GV of a rebel-held area in the old city of Homs, showing Notre Dame de Paix church
  29. GV of Khldiyyeh neighborhood, Khaled Ibn al-Walid mosque can be seen (one of the most famous and ancient mosques in Homs)
  30. Closer shot of Khled Ibn al-Walid mosque in Homs
  31. Various wide shots of destroyed previously rebels-held neighborhoods in the old city, devastated building can be seen
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Father Frans Van Der Lugt Interview
By yazanhomsy
09 Apr 2014

Father Frans Van Der Lugt, a Dutch Roman Catholic priest, is determined to stay in Homs as hundreds have been evacuated from the besieged old city in the past week. The priest talks to the people of Netherlands and of the world as he describes the extremely difficult situation that the people of Homs face every day - at times preparing soup with only olives and grass, surviving bombings and keeping their faith as the situation continues to deteriorate around them.

Much of the priest's time has been spent arranging for both Muslims and Christians to leave the city, when they do not have services or prayer. Though there are now an estimated 28 Christians left, Father Franz vows to stay, even when no Christians are left. He is there to "be a church for everybody," and for the Syrian people.

TRANSLATION:

Good morning.

I first want to greet the Netherlands from Homs,

It is heart warming for me to be once again in contact with my motherland, my family,

my friends, and others, with that beautiful country called the Netherlands.

I again received some questions.

The first question is; why do you remain here?

First of all, or second, or third, we have here a large monastery, and a church, a Latin

parish, rooms and lectures halls, a large library, and space for people who want to come

for a retreat, and a fathers house with space for seven. If I would leave this premises,

nothing would be left of it, and that, for me, is an important aspect. Another important

aspect is the fact there are still Christians here, an estimated 28 Christians, who I do not

want to abandon. There are not only Christian people in this house, but also important

artifacts. Lots of people who have fled, left artifacts with me. I now have, standing here,

beautiful icons from other churches which I rescued from the rubble. These are icons

from the 13th

scripts. How could I leave this all? That for me is impossible.

These are important reasons, but for me it is also important that here, where we are now,

we use to be 60,000 Christians with four Bishops and lots of priests, 8 to 10 churches.

Them leaving this area is regrettable. I think that somehow we need to clarify that

Christians live here and that others should return, and they will return, but almost all the

houses are destroyed, the wood has disappeared, how are they to return? This is a very

difficult question. Nevertheless, I think that if we stay, if we can stay, we can receive

people and help them return.

The other families, why are they remaining there? Somehow for similar reasons, if they

would leave, nothing will remain of their houses and they will no longer be able to

return. While if they stay, they can remain here, as their house remains intact.

The aid that arrived is absolutely insufficient. I do not know exactly how many people

remain here, I think around 2000. Some aid made it into the city and it included pans,

kitchen towels, and other similar items, and these are items the people here are not in

need of. They need food, such as rice, and not much arrived. That is also why there is

still a great shortage of food. Even this morning, I was woken up at 7am, after making

arrangements for the departure of Christians, when I went to bed at 3am. They woke me

and 14th

century. I also have here religious objects from mosques, old

up saying, "We need something to eat and you have food in this monastery." I answered

them by saying 'I don't have any food, you're welcome to check, and what you find, what

I have, I will give you, but there is nothing anymore.” And these people are hungry, they

want to eat, and this hunger has remained. It does not disappear by the modest aid

arriving from outside.

Yes, and then there is the complication of the two large UN vehicles which arrived and

were targeted with bomb attacks. We were close by. Luckily we survived, but it leads to

the question, "Where do these explosive devices come from?'

I can only say that these exploding devices did not come from the rebels or activists, or

however you refer to these people, also not from the government, but it seems there is a

third group. I think if you want to describe the third group, you first need to carefully

research. You cannot accuse people out of the blue, but after a while you can come to the

understanding who did do it. So there was a bomb attack in the morning and one in the

evening. And the next day, at least 15 people died due to these attacks, so this a serious

matter. It became really difficult to get all the supplies, including food, out of the

vehicles.

They managed to reach the bags that remained in the vehicles and managed to transfer

them to a storage space.

The next question asks what will happen now, after the truce. What you notice now, what

is rather painful, all the people, the rebels that remain, see those people fleeing. I don't

know how many fled, maybe a 1000 or 2000, and they [people/rebels who stayed behind]

also want to leave, they want see their family, their loved ones. Tthey long for so much

after a two-year long unnatural life.

They want to leave, get back to work, see their parents, siblings. Instead they see all these

people fleeing and they have to stay. And in this way, if I may, their motivation is

being 'castrated'

They have no more motivation, they see no light at the horizon, they wonder what there

is still to happen, what is the use of all of we go through.

When there is a shortage of food, that is already difficult. But if there is no longer a

driving cause, it also complicates things. They question what is the cause or use of what

we experience here. This is the feeling here, in combination with the hunger and no food,

no sense of a greater cause, they have the urge to leave, this all plays its part.

[08:03] Simultaneously, they claim that again there is a need to fight, and they wonder

how will we fight when we are hungry, when we are exhausted, we have no motivation,

how are we going to fight.

I hope an agreement will come between the government and the rebels, that we move

towards a situation where no longer people get injured, or are victims of violence, but at

the moment, it is extremely difficult to say how this will proceed.

I think the hunger will become more important, I think the situation is no longer viable,

so we don't know where this is going, also for us this is a difficult situation, what will

happen to us? Will we have enough to eat? These are all big questions that we face at the

moment.

[09:04 – he looks at his paper and resumes with another question]

What do you do everyday? Well, currently I am still very busy with organising the

departure of Christians, but also Muslims, and this continues to demand a lot of my time.

The obvious next question would be, what are you going to do once this is done?

There are only 25 Christians left, and what are you going to do?

Well, I am going to attend to those 25 Christians, I am going to attend to others, and I

like to read and pray, and I enjoy writing. I have no problem passing the time, that is for

me really no problem. I also do 'Zen', these Buddha practices, and I enjoy sitting in this

Buddha posture, and I attempt to be silent within myself, and attempt to find sources

within myself to have the strength to continue to provide water to others.

This is important to me, that I don't despair, but continue to be hopeful, so I continue to

mean something to others, for everybody.

[10:18 He looks at his notes]

Yes, food is scarce. What we eat is some olives in the morning with some tea and in the

afternoon, we make soup with some vegetables. These vegetables we derive from the

street. At times when we walk through the streets ,we notice between the rubble some

green patches, some greens coming up from between the cracks in the street, and that we

cut and add to the soup, in so far as its trustworthy.

In the past, it could have been the dogs and other animals, like small cats, that would eat

this. Now we add it to our soup if deemed edible. And we still have a kind of cereal,

cooked and crushed. It is here referred to as Bulgur.

This is all we use to make the soup. With some olives, this is the afternoon soup. In the

evening we see what is left over, and see if we received anything during the day. You're

certain to lose weight this way, you're certainly not going to gain weight.

Nevertheless, we endure and attempt to continue as much as possible with what we get as

a meal, a modest meal.

[11:43 He looks at his notes]

[utters something in arabic and apologizes]

The activities of the Church?

First of all, there is the specific activity of the church of providing mass in church and

praying.

We still celebrate the mass with them, as far as we can celebrate this here.

Aside from this, we still attend to the social parish responsibilities towards these people.

At this point it is very important for me that the church is here for everybody.

[at 12:22 it jumps back a few seconds and repeats almost everything from 11:59]

I am here for everybody.

And when I reside in Syria, I am not only here for the sisters and priests, but I am here

for all the Syrians, and I want to serve all the Syrians, both Muslims and Christians, and

that has always been my starting point.

I said once that even when all the Christians leave, I will remain because I am here for all

the Syrians, I am here to serve all the Syrians, and Syria as a country which I love.

So I attend to everybody as much as possible.

I attempt to be a church for everybody. The gospel belongs to us all, and then the first

question is, if you yourself believe in the word of God sufficiently for it to be obvious to

others without having to talk about God or the gospel, or what it entails to be a Christian.

It should naturally radiate from you, as the water from a source and the smell from a

flower.

[13:44 He looks at his notes]

What could or should the international organisations do?

I think we should first clarify what Syria actually wants, as it does not revolve around

what others want from Syria, or how outsiders see this area in the future through the lens

of their interests. It all revolves around what the people here want, and that is not clear

yet.

You cannot take 5 percent of the population and claim this is representative of what

society wants.

[14:29] Society here contains many nuances, there are people with different origins,

different tribes, there so many people here, and all so diverse, that you first have to

properly analyse what society as an entity, in all its diverseness, actually wants to

achieve.

This takes time and in the mean time all these organisations should serve the people, the

society, that is democracy, Democritus, the power of the people, let that power rise, and

then see how you can help these people with their loss of strength, see how you can assist

them to regain their strength.

So the starting point should be more about the local reality, and assist the people with

their genuine needs.

[15:23 He looks at his notes]

What can the government in the Netherlands do?

I first want to say that I am grateful towards the Netherlands, because they assisted me

enormously in all my projects. My family has supported me, the organisations and

charities, the government, and I am very grateful for this.

These projects are affected by the violence, but we continue.

I think what we have to ask the Netherlands now, is to assist in returning Syria to his old

self, rebuilding the country. I don't know when this will be possible.

In the same way the Netherlands has always supported us, they should continue to do so.

When we start rebuilding, and when we need money for this, for those who need to

reconstruct their house, those who have to start all over again, those poor people who

have nothing anymore, and who will ask for our help.

We are going to create projects, carefully planned ones, as the Dutch love this, and they

are correct to do so.

We will come with these projects and need money, maybe we will need clothes, but we

will inform you when the time comes.

[17:01 – from here to 17:08 it is difficult to translate as some piece have been cut out]

That the Netherlands is prepared to support Syria on its way to its former glory.

[17:15 – Arabic – something has been cut again]

I would like to end with expressing my gratitude to the Netherlands for everything they

did for us and we hope they will continue to do so.

Thank you very much, and until the next time, Inshallah

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Father Frans Van Der Lugt B-Roll
Homs, Syria
By yazanhomsy
09 Apr 2014

Father Frans Van Der Lugt, a Dutch Roman Catholic priest, is determined to stay in Homs as hundreds have been evacuated from the besieged old city in the past week. The priest talks to the people of Netherlands and of the world as he describes the extremely difficult situation that the people of Homs face every day - at times preparing soup with only olives and grass, surviving bombings and keeping their faith as the situation continues to deteriorate around them.

Much of the priest's time has been spent arranging for both Muslims and Christians to leave the city, when they do not have services or prayer. Though there are now an estimated 28 Christians left, Father Franz vows to stay, even when no Christians are left. He is there to "be a church for everybody," and for the Syrian people.

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Syrian Government Forces Attacking th...
Al Zarah, Syria
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

Location: Homs outskirts, Syria
Slug: Military operation in al-Zarah village
Duration: 01’ 44”
Sound: Natural
Aspect Ratio/DEF: 16:9/SD
Source: TTM
Restrictions: TTM clients only
Dateline: 07-03-2014

Shotlist:

  1. GV of al-Zarah village west of Homs
  2. Tracking of a Syrian air force jet
  3. Med of Syrian flag
  4. Wide of a burned fuel container hit by a shell
  5. Wide of an artillery shooting
  6. Med shot from on top of an artillery, pull in to wide of the spot where the shell fell
  7. Wide of various militia members loyal to Syrian government
  8. Med of a fighter looking with his military telescope
  9. Med of a fighter using his telescope
  10. Med of short-range missile
  11. Wide of a short-range artillery while shooting, pan/pull in to the spot where it fell
  12. tracking/med of a tank
  13. Two shots of fighters shooting their machine guns
  14. Med of a hole made in sand berms
  15. GV of the plains outside al-Zarah village

Storyline:

The Syrian Army army seized control of al-Zarah town in the countryside of Talkalakh in Homs province on Saturday, according to a report by the Syrian state news agency SANA.
The report says army units killed large numbers of opposition fighters and destroyed their weapons.
SANA says 30 opposition fighters in al-Zarah town surrendered and handed over their weapons.

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Father Francis Vanederlcht Assassinat...
homs
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

Jesuit Monastery, Besieged Homs
07/04/2014
Father Francis Vanederlcht was shot in the head by a masked gunman who broke into the Jesuit Monastery in Homs' rebel held area of Boustan al-Diwan on April 7, 2014, killing him instantly.
The monastery's inhabitants shrouded Vanederlcht's body and buried him in the monastery soon after the incident.
Father Francis Vanederlcht refused to leave Homs during the February evacuation and stayed with the remaining christian inhabitants.

دير الآباء اليسوعيين، حمص المحاصرة 07/04/2014
اقتحم ملثم يحمل مسدس حربي عند العاشرة من صباح اليوم الاثنين 07/04/2014 دير الآباء اليسوعيين الواقع في احياء حمص القديمة المحاصرة والتي تقع تحت سيطرة المعارضة. المسلح قام باطلاق النار على الأب فرنس فندرلاخت وأصابه بطلقة في رأسه مما أدى الى مقتله على الفور. سكان الدير من المواطنين المسيحيين قاموا بتكفين الجثمان مباشرة بعد الحادثة، وقد تم دفن جثة الأب فرانس داخل الدير. وكان الأب فرنس قد رفض الخروج في حملات الاجلاء التي تمت في شباط الفائت اثر اتفاق بين المسلحين المعارضين والقوات الحكومية التي تحاصر أحياء حمص القديمة منذ اكثر من سنة، وفضل البقاء في الدير مع نحو 23 من السكان المسيحيين.

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A witness describes the assassination...
Homs
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

Video Shot on April 9, 2014 in the Jesuit Monastery in the old city of Homs, Syria.
Shows B-roll of the grave of father Frans Van der Lugt, and interviews with three citizens of the local christian community that are still living in the monastery located in the besieged opposition held areas in Homs.
Father Frans was assassinated on Monday, April 7, when an unknown masked gunman shot him in the head in the monastery according to Mazhar, one of the monastery inhabitants who witnessed the assassination.

Mazhar:
He came here and I was in the monastery, he said he wanted to meet with father Frans. I said, why do you want to see him? He said, there’s a question I want to ask him and I came to see him, so I told him wait till he wakes up. So he said, can’t we see him now, so I told him no please wait he will be out in 5-10 minutes.
Interviewer:
What did he look like?
Mazhar:
Thin I think, not tall and not short, average, and he was wearing a mask, we could only see his eyes.
Then father Frans came out of his room, said Al Salam Alaykum. So we answered him Wa Alaykum Al Salam. The masked guy said we will take you and you will be very happy with us, the father said: I don’t leave the monastery, so the guy said: how come you don’t leave the monastery? So he said: I stay here and never leave the monastery, so the man said alright then sit on the chair, he sat on the chair. So I said please take it easy what are you going to do? So he said, you sit on the side before I shoot you. So the Father said: I will sit and when he sat down he shot him.

Nazem:
Christians are Arab Syrian citizens in every way possible, we can’t differentiate them from other citizens, so the form of the question used as Christians or non-Christians is not necessary, we’re Arab citizens, we defend our country, our churches, our sects, and our existence in general.
Monastery of the Jesuit Fathers was an institution throughout the history, not related to a specific person, no doubt father Frans had a huge role that we can’t forget, and he’s one of the reasons that made us stay, he made us more attached to our land, our existence, our houses, our churches, and monasteries. And he insisted on staying here and never leaving the monastery and he helped us establish these beliefs. The monastery is going to continue spreading the message that he started with and we consider that father Frans is still with us by his soul and thoughts that supported humanity mostly.
Ofcourse we feel the danger surrounding us, especially after the assassination, but this danger isn’t enough for us to leave.
Interviewer:
How about you Mrs Marry
Mary:
I am scared, I feel scared but I would never leave the monastery, this is the message of our Father and his home and this monetary is what kept us together all the Christians.
Nazem:
Ofcourse we know who assassinated Father Frans, he’s a person who is completely ignorant, if he had any idea who is father Frans, he wouldn’t have done such a thing.
Mary: A coward, if he was a normal person who knows god he wouldn’t have done it, he’s a coward.
Nazem:
Of course not I was with father Frans in the past while, day by day and hour by hour, there wasn’t any threats, contrary, I don’t think anyone would try to harm a person like father Frans.
Mary:
we remember his goodness, how he was a loving father, with his big heart that contains everyone, he loved all the people, even the ones who had a lot of hatred in them, he knew they felt this way but he loved them, his intentions were always towards love, and he had a saying that he always used “move forward”, he never holds people’s mistakes against them, he sees lots of mistakes from the people who surround him but he never holds their mistakes against them he just says “move forward”. Nazem:
Father Franse, even though the question is simple, but the answer is history, archives, a life story, a movie if you want to call it, the most important thing that he had done is that he made us feel that we are all in one church, all the Christian sects, we all gather and pray n one church. And as Sister Mary said, Father Frans was the most pure, wonderful person we’ve eve met, you might not know this but he has a PHD in psychology, he’s a very profound person, he’s not shallow, he sees things from the inside, he is simply a message in this life, a long hard journey from life on earth to the kingdom of heaven. He is a well-respected, generous person who is considered a peacemaker among all the people who knew him.
After we lost father Frans we became twenty-three Christian here in the monetary, of course the situation is very difficult and has been for a long time, we call it the rough days, lack of food, we don’t have water anymore, no electricity, we always say thank god, we’re now in the spring and the land is giving us many things that we’re seeing for the first time but we’re learning how to deal with it and cook it and benefit from the nutrition in it which helping us to live and survive.
Mary:
we’re suffering from the lack of electricity and food, we’re living on some types of grass and greens and some nice people are bringing us groats so we’re using it to make soup, and that’s what we’re suffering from, it’s very hard, there’s no electricity or water so we have to use buckets to get some water.

Frame 0004
Memorial Mass for Father Frans Van de...
Homs
By Transterra Editor
09 Apr 2014

A mass for Father Frans Van der Lugt was held on Wednesday, April 9th, in Al Mokhales monastery in Al Adawiya Neighborhood, Homs.
With the exception of the Governor of Homs, government officials were absent.
The memorial was attended by members of the public in the local christian community, and bishops Jerjes Abou Zakhm, Selouanus Butros Al Nahema, Yuhana Abdo Arbass, Philippe Barakat, Naouras Sammour, and Papal Nuncio Mario Zinari.
The mass began at 12:00 pm and ended at 3:30 pm.
Father Frans Van der Lugt was assassinated on Monday, April 7th, when an unknown masked gunman shot him in the head in his monastery in the old city of Homs.

Frame 0004
Syrian Army Entering the Village of A...
Al Zara, Homs, Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
09 Apr 2014

Location: al-Zara, Syria
Slug: Forces loyal to Syria government entering the village
Duration: 02’ 03”
Sound: Natural
Aspect Ratio/Definition: 16:9/SD
Source: TTM
Restrictions: TTM clients only
Dateline: 09-03-2014

Shotlist:

  1. On shoulder shot/ plains outside the village, smoke in the skyline, man in military uniform walking
  2. Armed men in military uniform walking inside a trench
  3. Wide of men in military uniform with their guns walking away in green plain
  4. Wide of several men in military uniform advancing, followed by a convoy of tanks
  5. Wide of a house with smoke rising form it
  6. Pan of a tank advancing, with various of fighters on both sides
  7. Wide of military truck with a gun on top advancing through the plains
  8. Pan of a fighter carrying a gun in one hand and some kind of barrel (thought to be a hand made bomb)
  9. Tow shots of damaged houses inside the village
  10. Wide of a building with a sign on it reading: Al-Zarah health center. Reading on the wall: Freedom (on the left of the door), Go away- Down with Assad (to the right of the door)
  11. Wide of a street inside the village when a vehicle passed near a few men in military uniforms
  12. Various shots of destructions inside the town
  13. Wide of graves outside one of the houses
  14. Wide of building with black smoke rising from it

Storyline:

Video shows Syrian Government forces entering the village of al-Zara near Homs on March 9, 2014. It shows soldiers in the streets and extensive damage to buildings and vehicles with smoke rising from some buildings.
A report by the Syrian state news agency SANA says government forces entered after clearing the village of opposition forces.

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Father Frans Assassination in Homs, S...
By Transterra Editor
06 Apr 2014

Jesuit Monastery, Besieged Homs
07/04/2014
Father Francis Vanederlcht was shot in the head by a masked gunman who broke into the Jesuit Monastery in Homs' rebel held area of Boustan al-Diwan on April 7, 2014, killing him instantly.
The monastery's inhabitants shrouded Vanederlcht's body and buried him in the monastery soon after the incident.
Father Francis Vanederlcht refused to leave Homs during the February evacuation and stayed with the remaining christian inhabitants.

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Destruction of Homs 04
Homs
By yazan1985
09 Mar 2014

File photo shows destructions in the Syrian city of Homs, in March 2014.

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Rocket Attack in Government Held area...
Homs, Syria
By Transterra Editor
26 Feb 2014

Rocket Shelling on residential neighborhoods in the government controlled areas of Homs Date: 27/2/2014 Location of Shooting: Akrama Neighborhood in the city of Homs 6 people killed and 24 injured after being hit by “Grad” rockets in the Akrama neighborhoods of Homs, which lies under the control of the Syrian government. Local source in the city said 8 people were killed and at least 21 injured by a Grad rocket on Akrama Neighborhood in the city of Homs and three other people were injured by another Grad rocket that hit a house in the Alkhodari street in the neighborhood of Wadi al Dahab, Homs. The government has accused Syrian opposition militants of firing the rockets on the neighborhoods controlled by the government.

قذائف صاروخية تستهدف أحياء سكنية في مناطق تخضع لسيطرة النظام في مدينة حمص تاريخ الإنتاج: 27/2/2014 موقع التصوير: حي عكرمة مدينة حمص قتل 6 أشخاص وأصيب 24 بجروح جراء سقوط قذائف صاروخية في أحياء حمص التي تقع تحت سيطرة الحكومة السورية. مصادر محلية أعلنت أن 8 أشخاص قتلوا على الأقل وصيب 21 بجروح جراء سقوط صاروخ من نوع "غراد" على حي عكرمة في مدينة حمص ، كما أصيب 3 أشخاص بجروح بسبب سقوط صاروخ من نوع "غراد" على أحد المنازل في شارع الخضري بحي وادي الدهب . وأضاف المصادر ان الصاروخ الذي وقع في حي عكرمة ادى الى احتراق 8 سيارات والحاق اضرار مادية كبيرة بالمنازل والمحال التجارية .. واتهمت الحكومة السورية مسلحي المعارضة بإطلاق الصواريخ على الأحياء التي تقع تحت سيطرة النظام ..

6 Images
2 Video

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Disabled Evacuated From Homs 6
Homs, Syria
By Transterra Editor
15 Feb 2014

A young man sitting on a chair holding his clutches as her mother and sister stand at his side. He was injured during armed clashes between government forces and the opposition in Khalidiyeh in Old Homs.

شاب يجلس على كرسي وبيده ( عكاز ) وقد أصيب خلال المواجهات بين القوات الحكومية ومسلحي المعارضة في حي الخالدية بحمص القديمة .. وتقف الى جانبه زوجنه ووالدته

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Disabled Evacuated From Homs 7
Homs, Syria
By Transterra Editor
15 Feb 2014

A young man from Bab Al-Hod is sitting on a wheelchair with his friends next to him as he waits to be transported to the medical center.

شاب من حي باب هود يجلس الى جانبه صديقه قبله نقله الى المشفى بعد تعرضه لإصابة في ظهره