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Nigerian Army Implicated in Village A...
Jos
By jfaden
08 Jul 2015

At the moment when the world is focusing its attention on reporting on Boko Haram atrocities, the Nigerian army in its bid to fight insurgency on its soil was accused of committing human right abuses.
Amnesty International has report evidence of human right abuses perpetrated by the Nigerian Army in the North Eastern part of Nigeria with proof based on dozens of military documents, interviews with victims and eyewitnesses.
However the Nigerian Army has since denied the authenticity of the report through the Chief of Administration of Nigeria Army, Major General Adamu Baba Abubakar who said they have commenced investigation into Amnesty International’s allegations against them saying the allegations against the Nigerian troops can dampen the spirit and morale of troops.
Major-General Adamu also accused Amnesty International of not cooperating with the Nigerian Army in the investigation saying the Nigerian military is a conventional and professional military that is driven by international standards and best practices.
Meanwhile the people living in villages around Jos in North Eastern Nigeria are not buying the military’s version of the story as they have been crying out over what they termed as unfair harassment and brutal treatment by the army sent for peace keeping in the volatile area.
The villages in the North Eastern part of Nigeria close to Jos City have been a battle ground with an average of 10 people murdered weekly by what security operatives called 'unknown gunmen' who many suspected to be Boko Haram insurgents running from the Nigerian Army in the north east and looking for a more peaceful settlement like the north central region.
The villagers have been raising alarm over the influx of strangers in the area which makes many to flee from their ancestral homes. The Gunmen killed and sacked dozens of villages rendering thousands homeless (at the moment it is dangerous to go in and film the destruction in the interior).
The Army is stationed in those villages but the attacks were going on unabated which makes the villagers to be suspicious of the army and accuse them of complicity in the attacks.
Whenever there was an attack on any village in the area and the villagers demand to know why they were been attacked with the army around instead they will be harassed, beaten, threatened to be arrested and sometimes shot at by the military without explanation.
Things went out of hand on the 17th of June last month in the village of Heipang about 20kms from Jos city when women protesting the army stationing their armored tank close to where the women displayed their ware for sale by the roadside as that will scared customers were shot at directly by the soldiers, two women were hit by bullets and died on the spot, one was shot at with a baby on her back as she ran into a shop for protection.
First week of this month, for three days, the army came to the village around Foron about 35 kms to Jos in Hilux trucks and armored tanks breaking into the houses of the villagers who fled on seeing the soldiers, destroying properties and even killing animals, despites the villagers demand for explanation, they refused to explain what they were looking for and ruled out any compensation.
The Army also refused to be interviewed on tape instead they accused the villagers of attacking soldiers which they said is what led to the house to house assault and refused to also produce evidence supporting the statement on attacks on their men.

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Nigeria: Witnesses Describe Village A...
Foron Village, Jos, Nigeria
By jfaden
08 Jul 2015

At the moment when the world is focusing its attention on reporting on Boko Haram atrocities, the Nigerian army in its bid to fight insurgency on its soil was accused of committing human right abuses.

Amnesty International has report evidence of human right abuses perpetrated by the Nigerian Army in the North Eastern part of Nigeria with proof based on dozens of military documents, interviews with victims and eyewitnesses.

In this video, witnesses of an attack on Foron, a small village near Jos, tell their stories, and speak out against the perpetrators of the attacks.

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Nigeria: Witnesses Describe Village A...
Heipang Village, Jos, Nigeria
By jfaden
08 Jul 2015

At the moment when the world is focusing its attention on reporting on Boko Haram atrocities, the Nigerian army in its bid to fight insurgency on its soil was accused of committing human right abuses.

Amnesty International has report evidence of human right abuses perpetrated by the Nigerian Army in the North Eastern part of Nigeria with proof based on dozens of military documents, interviews with victims and eyewitnesses.

In this video, witnesses of an attack on Heipang a small village near Jos, tell their stories, and speak out against the perpetrators of the attacks.

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Eyewitness Footage of Attack on Niger...
Heipang Village, Jos, Nigeria
By jfaden
17 Jun 2015

Mobile footage captured by a local villager showing a woman allegedly killed by the Nigerian Army.

On the 17th of June in the village of Heipang, about 20 kms from Jos city, women were protesting against the army stationing their armored vehicle close to where they displayed their wares for sale by the roadside, as that would scare customers. These women were shot at directly by the soldiers. Two women were hit by bullets and died on the spot, one was shot at with a baby on her back as she ran into a shop for protection.

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Escaping Boko Haram: Nigerians Adapt ...
Jos
By jfaden
04 May 2015

Nigeria is a very diverse country, sometimes starting a new life in a different community other than one's own is a daunting task. However, the displaced people from Boko Haram dominated enclaves have no choice.

Samson, his two brothers, their wives, and their children fled their homes in Uvakh'a, about 5 kilometers from Gwoza, in northeastern Nigeria. They fled Boko Haram's onslaught and their hometown is now a stronghold of the militant group. The family is currently sheltering in the central Nigerian city of Jos, trying to start a new life, form a new community, and preserve their identity as they have little hope of going back to their village in the near future.

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Iraqis Flee Ramadi as ISIS Advance to...
Anbar, Ramadi
By Arshed
15 Apr 2015

Photos shot on a mobile phone show hundreds of Iraqis stuck in traffic as they attempt to flee Ramadi and the surrounding villages. ISIS militants launched a large offensive on Wednesday 15, April, and were able to seize control over the villages of Sjariyah, Albu-Ghanim and Soufiya, which had been under government control. The locals fear that the advance could reach Ramadi giving ISIS control over the capital of Anbar, Iraq’s largest province. ISIS insurgents are now about 100Km from Anbar’s Ain Al-Asad air base, where hundreds of US and coalition forces have been training Iraqi troops.

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Trekking the Annapurna Circuit
Annapurna Massif
By Noe Falk Nielsen
14 Apr 2015

Every year around 50,000 trekkers trek around the Annapurna Massif making it one of the more popular treks in the world. Despite the number of trekkers introducing tourism as a stable source of income in the region, some of the inhabitants are still going about their business as they have done for hundreds of years. This collection is a visual journey following the Annapurna Circuit from Buhlebuhle to the world highest pass, the Thorong La Pass (5416 meters above sea level) and down to Muktinah on the other side depicting the scenery, while pausing to explore the life of the local inhabitants as they navigate in an ever changing world.

ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Annapurna Circuit 23
Annapurna
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Mar 2015

Old Nepalese woman carding wool on the main street of Muktinath (3800 meters altitude) 121 kilometres into the trek. As with Manang Muktinath is the main hub coming down from the pass and as such largely dependent on tourism.

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Annapurna Circuit 22
Annapurna
By Noe Falk Nielsen
24 Mar 2015

Grandmother and grandchild at the former's shop in Muktinath (3800 meters altitude) 121 kilometres into the trek on 24 March 2015. With 50,000 tourists passing through Muktinath every year money has made Muktinath into a somewhat prosperous town and most inhabitants are in one way or another engaged in the tourists industry.

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Annapurna Circuit 21
Thorang la pass
By Noe Falk Nielsen
23 Mar 2015

Thorong La Pass. 5416 meters above sea level and 111 kilometres into the trek on 23 March 2015. Highest point on the Annapurna Circuit and highest pass in the world.

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Annapurna Circuit 20
Thorong la pass
By Noe Falk Nielsen
23 Mar 2015

The track to Thorang La Pass having passed 5,000 meters altitude on 23 March 2015.

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Annapurna Circuit 19
Thorang Phedi
By Noe Falk Nielsen
22 Mar 2015

The entrance to the village of Thorang Phedi at 4450 meters altitude 105 kilometres into the trek on 22 March 2015. The region had received more snow than in the preceding 30 years and the access to Thorang La Pass, the highest pass in the world, had been blocked until a few days before.

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Annapurna Circuit 16
Manang
By Noe Falk Nielsen
20 Mar 2015

A cow on the slope of the Annapurna Massif after Manang at 3540 meters altitude 90 kilometres into the trek on 20 March 2015. Cows/Yaks still provide the people in the mountains with milk, cheese, meat, and wool. From Manang and onwards it is mostly just inhabited in the tourist season as the snow stops other activities most of the year.

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Annapurna Circuit 17
Manang
By Noe Falk Nielsen
20 Mar 2015

The view from the village of Gunsang (3,700 meters altitude) of the peak of Gangapurna Himal on 20 March 2015.

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Annapurna Circuit 18
Yak Kharta
By Noe Falk Nielsen
20 Mar 2015

The village of Yak Kharta at 4,050 meters 99 kilometres into the trek at night. Without light pollution the stars are highly visible in the sky.

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Annapurna Circuit 15
Manang
By Noe Falk Nielsen
20 Mar 2015

Further up from Manang (3540 meters altitude) a woman is selling beads and religious figures to trekkers passing by flanked by a prayer wheel on 20 March 2015. Local production and sale of merchandise is another way to tap into the market generated by increasing tourism.

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Annapurna Circuit 14
Manang
By Noe Falk Nielsen
20 Mar 2015

The village of Manang at 3540 meters altitude 90 kilometres into the hike. Manang is the main hub when heading for Thorong La Pass and as such packed with tea houses and restaurants. A bad snow storm killed at least 43 people in October 2014, and with heavy snowfall in the region in March 2015 the Nepalese authorities chose to close down the pass for a number of days in March until it was deemed safe to continue.

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Annapurna Circuit 12
Bhraka
By Noe Falk Nielsen
19 Mar 2015

The village of Braga (3450 meters altitude) with the peaks of Annapurna III (7555 meters) and Gangapurna Himal (7454 meters) in the background on 19 March 2015.

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Annapurna Circuit 13
Bhakra
By Noe Falk Nielsen
19 Mar 2015

Prayer flags at 4,300 meters altitude above the village of Bhraka (3450 meters altitude) 88 kilometres into the Hike on 19 March 2015. The peak of Annapurna III (7555 meters) is clearly visible in the background on 19 March 2015.

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Annapurna Circuit 11
Bhraka
By Noe Falk Nielsen
19 Mar 2015

Bhraka located 3450 meters above sea level and 88 kilometers along the trail is a small town at the foothill of Annapurna III (7555 meters) and Ganggapurna (7454 meters). The village consists of a newer part along the road with tea houses and an old part clustered on the side of a small mountain. That progress has reach Bhraka is discernible by the number of satellite dishes on the roofs of the buildings in the old part of town (depicted).

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Annapurna Circuit 10
Ghyaru
By Noe Falk Nielsen
18 Mar 2015

Buddhist shrine on the way to Ghyaru (3730 meters altitude, 74 kilometers from start). Religion still plays an important part of many Nepalese's lives and shrines are found all along the trek.

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Annapurna Circuit 05
Chame, Nepal
By Noe Falk Nielsen
17 Mar 2015

At 2,710 meters altitude Chame lies 56 kilometres into the Annapurna Circuit trek. Chame, Nepal, 17 March 2015. Chame is a hub on the trek and houses numerous tea houses, which are mostly full during the peak season between September and November. Tourism in Nepal contributes just below 10% of GDP and employs around half a million people.

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Annapurna Circuit 08
Upper Pisang
By Noe Falk Nielsen
17 Mar 2015

Trekkers trekking towards Upper Pisang at 3,310 meters altitude 70 kilometers into the hike on 17 March 2015. Trekkers have brought certain wealth to the region from the hiring of guides and porters to the numerous tea houses and restaurants that can be found along the route. With an expected 25 USD per person per day for just food and lodging the 50,000 trekkers are a source of survival for many Nepalese both in Kathmandu and around the Annapurna Massif.

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Annapurna Circuit 06
Chame
By Noe Falk Nielsen
17 Mar 2015

Nepalese baby in Chame (2710 meters altitude), Nepal on a toy vehicle on 17 March 2015. As tourism creates jobs and a source of income an increase in the standard of living is discernible along the route. Many locals wear North Face (Fake), while the children play with modern toys.

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Annapurna Circuit 07
Chame
By Noe Falk Nielsen
17 Mar 2015

Where before the Annapurna Circuit was accessible solely by foot, a road has now been build that makes it possible to move people and goods all the way to Chame (2710 meters altitude). The road has opened up for quicker access, but has also made it possible to bypass many small villages along the trek losing the family owned establishments precious income.

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Annapurna Circuit 09
Upper Pisang
By Noe Falk Nielsen
17 Mar 2015

The village of Bhratang (2850 meters altitude, 63 kilometers from start). Along with the road the small villages along the trek have received power as well making life somewhat easier along the trek. The snowfall was particularly heavy this year, the worst in 30 years, making access to the villages more difficult and increasing the fear of lavines and landslides.

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Annapurna Circuit 04
Annapurna
By Noe Falk Nielsen
15 Mar 2015

Nepalese lumberjacks cutting up trees on the slope of the Annapurna Massif close to the village of Chamche (1385 meters altitude) on 15 March 2015. Using depleteable natural resources like timber remain a source of income for many poor families in Nepal.

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Annapurna Circuit 01
Annapurna
By Noe Falk Nielsen
14 Mar 2015

Little Nepalese girl breaking rocks for construction work on the slope of the Annapurna massif close to the village of Bahundanda at 1310 meters altitude on 14 March 2015. The Annapurna Circuit is one of the most popular treks in the world and around 50,000 people hike around the massif per year.

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Annapurna Circuit 02
Annapurna
By Noe Falk Nielsen
14 Mar 2015

Little Nepalese girl breaking rocks for construction work on the slope of the Annapurna massif close to the village of Bahundanda (1310 meters altitude). Despite the many tourists and the money it brings to the region the local residents still carry on as they have done for hundreds of years.

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Annapurna Circuit 03
Annapurna
By Noe Falk Nielsen
14 Mar 2015

Old Nepalese woman carrying branches to her village on the slope of the Annapurna Massif close to the village of Ghermu (1130 meters altitude) on 14 March 2015. Some 30% of the Nepalese population live on less than half a dollar per day with poverty increasing the further away from Kathmandu you go. Most Nepalese live in the rural areas and depend on subsistence economy using the natural resources to provide for clothes, food, and heat.

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Syrian Assyrians Flee ISIS to Qamishli
Al-Qamishli
By TTM Contributor 33
25 Feb 2015

Qamishli, Syria
February 26, 2015

Christian-Assyrian refugees seek refuge in the Kurdish controlled city of Qamishli after fleeing ISIS advances on their villages of Tal Tamer, Tal Harmoza, Tal al-Jazeera, Tal Kouran and Abu Tina in the Hasakeh province. ISIS militants recently kidnapped 220 Assyrians in Hasakeh province setting a dangerous precedent for christians in the area and spurring entire villages to abandon their homes and flee ISIS advances.

SHOTLIST AND SOUNDBITES

Wide/ external of the Syriac Cultural Association in Syria
Wide of men holding diaper packs destined for displaced families
Wide of diaper packs and other supplies
Wide of supplies in pickup trucks
SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Michael Kourieh, Member of the Syriac Cross
00:23 – 01:30
The Syriac Cross for Relief and Development. Our work currently revolves on to help our Assyrian brothers who fled the Khabour and Tal Tamer areas. They are living in several Assyrian churches. Our aim is to help the Assyrian so that they would feel at home. As you see from these supplies, we work all day long so they would not feel like strangers.
More importantly, from the information that we gathered, we learned that the displaced came from the Khabour area in the hundreds.
We feel sad about that, but we are trying our best to help them and offer them aid.
Various associations in Qamishli are involved in this work, such as the United Nations and Mother Syria Association. Everyone is making an effort [UNINTELLIGIBLE]. We are all coordinating our work and we hope that everyone is pleased with our work. God willing, we shall remain a unified people. “

Wide of Syriac Cross members unloading aid supplies
Wide/ external Syriac Cultural Association in Syria
Wide of aid supplies

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Elizabeth Jouqa, A displaced from Tal Tamer area

01:50 – 03:30

We fled the moment we first heard that ISIS kidnapped women, young men and children. We ran away before ISIS arrived to avoid being captured.
Interviewer: Did many people flee?
Many! There is about 600 [displaced] families here in Qamishli. May God safeguard you.
My relatives were abducted. We do not where they are. Amy God protect them from [ISIS]. May God break their arms.
Interviewer: When did the attack take place?
It was in the morning. We heard about in the morning. We called our relatives In Tal Shmeiran who told us that [ISIS] invaded their village. They said that [ISIS] had taken the men two days earlier to an unknown location and that they were like sheep to the church and did not know what was going to happen to them.
Our men, fighters from the Sotoro organisation and the Kurds, may God protect them, defended the people, but what could they do? The others [ISIS] are many. There were probably 600 of them.
Interviewer: who do you demand help from? The international community? The autonomous administration here? Regional countries?

What can I say?
Interviewer: Do you want aid form the United Nations? Who do you want aid from?

We are grateful for anyone who wants to help us. I do not know who should help us.
Wide of Syriac Cross members unloading aid supplies
Wide of street
Traveling of street

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Julia Butros, A displaced from Tal Tawil village
03:49 – 05:27
It was in at five in the evening. They [the rescuers] took children and their father. It was at five o’clock. People fled using a mobile diesel tank. They removed the tank from the vehicle and put people in its place and took to Hasaka, and from Hasaka they were brought here to Qamishli. People arrived here at midnight. The trip started at five and took all night long.
We do not anyone who was kidnapped. It is said that people were kidnapped in other villages. We cannot say anything other than that we have seen did not see.
Interviewer: Did ISIS blow churches?
They did in another village but not in Tal Tawil. They blew up churches in another village. . In other villages there people whose whereabouts are not known.
Interviewer: How many people fled to Hasaka and Qamishli?

I do not know. May be around 300 or 400 people. Around 100 people fled from our village, Tal Tawil.

Interviewer: who do you demand help from? The international community? The United Nations?
May God reward them, whether they offered aid or not. May God reward you and anyone who helps these troubled people.
Interviewer: Is ISIS present in your village?
[ISIS] is present in other villages. This man’s wife does know anything about her family. Interviewer: Did the Kurdish fighters and the Syriac Council liberate these villages?
They are trying to help, I am not saying that they are not, but what can they do?

Wide of Syriac Cross members unloading aid supplies
Various of Christian icons hung on a wall
Close-up of sign hung on an aid vehicle reads: “An initiative of love and solidarity towards from Tal Tamer and Khabour.”

Close-up of sign on aid vehicle “Syriac Cross Organization for Relief & Development”
Medium of sign on aid vehicle “Syriac Cross Organization for Relief & Development”

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Fighters and Civilians Celebrate Kurd...
Countryside of Al-Qamishli
By Bedir
23 Feb 2015

NOTE Graphic scenes were removed from this video. If you are interested in obtaining them please contact Transterra Media.

People’s Protection Units (YPG) are advancing near Qamishli and have already retaken over 25 villages in military operations against ISIS all throughout Syria. The YPG began a military campaign about two days ago against villages and urban centers controlled by ISIS located in rural areas to the south of Qamishli.

The military operation continues for the third consecutive day with the support of coalition air forces. With their help, the YPG were able to liberate dozens of villages.
This operation was well received by both the Arab and Kurdish inhabitants of these villages, who both demonstrated their support when the YPG entered their villages to free them from the control of ISIS, which is restricting them and denying them their freedom.

Soundbites

(Arabic, man) Ali al-Hameed, Arab YPG fighter:
“Our goal is to rid all the villages in the area of ISIS; the YPG are quickly advancing. We are all brothers in fighting ISIS.

(Kurdish, man) Hoker Hussein, Kurdish fighter:
“We are here to avenge our martyrs who died in previous battles in Tilhamis. We get our strength and determination from the blood of the martyrs and the support of our people and, thanks to them, we shall win against ISIS.”

(Kurdish, woman) Mother of female fighter:
“We are here today to show loyalty to the blood of our martyrs. We have a good spirit and we have complete faith in our victory and that we are going to liberate our area from ISIS.”

(Kurdish, man) Idris Taher Aziz, Kurdish civilian from the village of Kherbet Jehash:
“When ISIS came close to our villages, we escaped their violent assaults. Now we have decided to return to our village after it was liberated by the YPG. We are happy to return home and, thanks to the YPG, life is slowly getting back to normal.”

(Arab, man) Majeed al-Habib, an Arab from the village of Bazoona:
“ISIS treated us horribly. They used to implement tough laws; they banned us from smoking; they forced women to wear the Niqab; and threatened our religious sites in the village. When the YPG entered and liberated us, we were very happy and welcomed them.”

(Kurdish, man): Nori, Kurdish fighter:

“When you look at those documents and papers, you see strange laws and regulations, as if you were living 2000 years before this time. It really indicates how retrograde their mentality is and how much suffering they have imposed on people. We have 7 ISIS fighters’ corpses, some are Arabs, some are foreigners. One had a Saudi flag, indicating the Saudi identity of some of them.”

Shotlist

Interviews with the fighters and shots of the liberated villages.
Shots of the liberated villages and their civilians
Interviews with the civilians
Various of YPG’s military forces
Various of remnants, documents and possessions, including flag of Saudi Arabia, presumably left behind by ISIS
Various of Nori, the fighter, speaking

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The World's Longest-Running Civil War
Myawaddy, Myanmar
By vincenzo floramo
30 Jan 2015

Photos by Vincenzo Floramo

Text by Portia Larlee

Thick fog lifted at the break of dawn January 31 to reveal rows of troops at the Karen National Liberation Army headquarters on the Thai-Myanmar border. It was Karen Revolution Day and hundreds of onlookers from Karen villages and refugee camps border-wide had gathered to commemorate Britain's departure from Burma in 1948 and the subsequent civil war between Karen and government forces. Decades later Karen, young and old, are driven by the fierce nationalism of generations past in the push for political autonomy.  The event was an excellent starting point from which to discuss what a post-ceasefire Myanmar might look like. The peace process continues, with a seventh round of ceasefire talks set for the coming months. Karen leaders, including Karen National Union chairman Mutu Say Poe addressed troops at the KNLA headquarters, urging a nationwide ceasefire – and eventually a "federal army." Discussion of “security reform” was missing from the day's speeches, largely because the future of Myanmar's ethnic minority armies following a nationwide ceasefire remains unclear. What will become of Myanmar's freedom fighters? 

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Iraqi special forces patrol around Sa...
Samarra - Qulah Road, Samarra,Iraq
By mushtaq mohammed
27 Jan 2015

Iraqi special forces soldiers and popular troops from 9th Division, lead by General Neemat Jawdat Al Ankushi, patrol in the area of Samerra, Iraq, on January 22, 2015 just after villages of this area have been liberated from Daech or ISIS militants.

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A Village Divided Between Lebanon and...
Dhaira
By wissam fanash
03 Jan 2015

Various elder residents of a Lebanese village on the border with Israel tell the story of how their village and families came to be divided by the creation of Israel in 1948. Part of the Aramsha clan, their lands included four of five villages that lay on both side of the future Lebanese-Israeli border prior to 1948. Today, they live in constant surveillance (a drone can be seen in the video) and are separated from their kin living in Israel by tank patrols, barbed wire and land mines. One resident speaks of how she lost her leg to a land mine laid by Israelis when attempting to attend her father's funeral on the other side of the border. Since she can no longer obtain a permit to visit her relatives, it has been 20 years since she last saw her family.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of Fakhri Fanash with grandchildren walking in garden
Various of Israeli armored vehicles driving along Israeli-Lebanese border

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Fakhri Fanash, Dignitary of Aramsha Clan
01:26 – 04:49

“We are part of the Aramsha clan, which live in about four or five villages. This is Dhaira; over there are the villages of Idmith, Iribbin and Jordeh. We are all cousins, brothers and relatives. The lands that can be seen within the occupied territories are ours. I can name them: over there is Safra, Bater, Jordeh, Jrad Moussa; this Khallet al-Adas or Khallet al-Saheb. All of these lands were ours. We were part of one tribe. The Israeli invasion, or colonialism, divided this land. Some people are here in Dhaira – about one quarter [of the clan] and three quarters stayed there. There were four brothers, two of whom stayed there and two came here.

After 1948, they [Israelis] started annexing lands and [planting] mines and barbed wires. They set up the land the way they wanted. They took this part of the land.
In the Lebanese part of these territories, which is still with us, there are landmines over there where these olive trees are planted.

Behind Jordeh there is a cemetery, called the Aramsha Cemetery. This was both ours and theirs. You see, when my grandfather died, people were crying. There was a Lebanese Army patrol to keep people apart. All of our relatives from Palestine came to the cemetery, but we were about two meters away from each other. When the Army saw that people were crying and concerned for each other, it allowed people from both sides to come together. There were no barbed wires or landmines in that spot. All people came together, and the funeral became like a wedding because people were able to reunite.

Look at that patrol [DRONE CAN BE SEEN IN THE SKY]. It goes on day and night. There are also armored vehicles and tanks. We have property deeds form the Ottoman era that prove [our ownership over] the land that you can see in front of you, which is vast. We have documents written by the notary of Acre. During peace negotiations between Lebanon and the Israeli enemy, the ministry of foreign affairs asked us to present these papers, which we did. Afterwards, things went bad among Arab countries and we did not get anything from this.”

Wide of Israeli patrol
Wide/ zoom out of Fakhri Fanash’s grandchildren watch Israeli armored vehicle on other side of the border.
Various of Khairiya al-Moghais walking

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Khairiya al-Moghais, Aramsha Clan Member

05: 14 – 09:05

“This is my sister [SHOWING PHOTOS]. These are my brother and his wife. This is also my brother and his wife. And this is my daughter.

It has been about 20 years. I used to visit them before, using a permit. Now I cannot go anywhere. I have not seen her for 20 years. This is also my brother. This is my daughter and this is my other daughter. When I see [their photo] I cry. I wish I could meet them.

I left my parents and ran away to Lebanon when I met my husband. I stayed at my sister’s, and then they took me to Beirut. I was sentenced to one month [in prison].

I have not seen my parents for 40 years.

Interviewer: Are you not communicating with them?
- No Interviewer: You do not know what is happening to them either?
- No, no. They forbid them… we used to shout to each other, but since the liberation we have not dared to talk to them. They do not dare to talk with us either.
Interviewer: Who is preventing you from doing that?
- We are scared. We are scared here. We do not dare. And over there, [Israeli] patrols guard the barbed wire.

I once heard an announcement over the loud speaker coming from the village of Jordeh. I thought my father died. I stepped on a wire. I was not thinking of the wire, I was only thinking of my father. I heard a sound and I thought I had stepped on a metal can. I did not realize it was a landmine. I walked a bit further and the landmine went off. I fell on the ground. I saw that my leg was cut off. I started to scream and people came in a hurry from Dhaira and from the other side, but people could not talk to each other.

I was lying in the middle; Israel was on this side and Lebanon on the other. Then they carried me away.

I stayed on the floor. I then extended my hand to a soldier from a patrol because I was in a lot of pain. I wanted him to lift me. He waved his hand as if to say “no.” They removed the landmines then took me in an ambulance.

I wish I could see my family and daughters before I… Then, I would not care if I died… All my relatives and family… we were all living together happily. Nobody did anything to us. This is our life.”

Wide of Israeli military post
Wide/ traveling of Israeli Humvee driving on other side of border
Wide of United Nation border demarcation barrel
Wide of territory across barbed wires
Various of landmine warning signs
Close up of flour/ demarcation barrel in background
Wide of car moving on other side of the Israeli border
Wide of Israeli military post
Various of landmine warning signs and border fence
Traveling of Jordeh, a village inhabited by Aramsha clan and held by Israel
Various of Israeli military transmission tower
Traveling of United Nations helicopter
Traveling of village Mazraat al-Aramsha, a village inhabited by Aramsha clan and controlled by Israel
Wide of woman walking by border fence on the Israeli side
Various of trees
Wide of houses on Israeli side of the border
Wide of children and cattle on Israeli side of border
Wide of landmine warning sign
Various of children on side of border

NAT Sound (Arabic) conversation across the border
-We are from Palestine. - What is your name? -Mohammad. - Mohammad what? -[UNINTELLIGIBLE] -Mohammad what? -Mohammad Jomaa. We are Arabs, not Jews. - Who are you? -Ahmad -Omar, Ali, Ahmad, Hammoudi, Lyn”

Children on Lebanese side waving the Palestinian flag.
Wide of Israeli Humvee driving by

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Portrait of Bedouin child
Assir, Israel
By Elo B
24 Jul 2013

Bedouin family threatened of displacement by the Prawer plan stand in their village of Assir in the Negev desert in Israel.The Israeli government is expecting the Knesset to pass a law confiscating over 850,000 dunums in the Negev, uprooting approximately 40 villages which will lead to the displacement of between 30,000 to 40,000 Palestinian Bedouins.

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Bedouin family threatened of displace...
Al Araqib, Israel
By Elo B
24 Jul 2013

Bedouin village of Assir in the Negev desert in Israel is threatened of displacement by the Prawer plan.The Israeli government is expecting the Knesset to pass a law confiscating over 850,000 dunums in the Negev, uprooting approximately 40 villages which will lead to the displacement of between 30,000 to 40,000 Palestinian Bedouins.

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Bedouin village threatened of displac...
Al Araqib, Israel
By Elo B
24 Jul 2013

Bedouin village of Assir in the Negev desert in Israel is threatened of displacement by the Prawer plan.The Israeli government is expecting the Knesset to pass a law confiscating over 850,000 dunums in the Negev, uprooting approximately 40 villages which will lead to the displacement of between 30,000 to 40,000 Palestinian Bedouins.

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Portrait of Bedouin child
Assir, Israel
By Elo B
24 Jul 2013

Portrait of a Bedouin child from the village of Assir in the Negev desert in Israel which is threatened of displacement by the Prawer plan .The Israeli government is expecting the Knesset to pass a law confiscating over 850,000 dunums in the Negev, uprooting approximately 40 villages which will lead to the displacement of between 30,000 to 40,000 Palestinian Bedouins.

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Portrait of Bedouin girls.
Assir, Israel
By Elo B
24 Jul 2013

Bedouin family threatened of displacement by the Prawer plan stand in their village of Assir in the Negev desert in Israel.The Israeli government is expecting the Knesset to pass a law confiscating over 850,000 dunums in the Negev, uprooting approximately 40 villages which will lead to the displacement of between 30,000 to 40,000 Palestinian Bedouins.