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Gazans Use Propane to Fuel Cars (Shor...
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
05 Nov 2014

Gaza, Palestinian Territories
November 4, 2014

The ongoing Israeli blockade on the Gaza Strip and the recent closure of most the tunnels used for smuggling goods from Egypt has led to a severe fuel shortage. As a result, some Gazans are modifying their car engines and generators to make them run on propane instead of gasoline. Propane is widely used for cooking in Gaza.

Shot list:

00:00 – 00:05
A general shot shows cars driving in both directions on a main road in Gaza City.

00:06 – 00:11
A close shot shows the exhaust pipe of a taxi as it drives away.

00:12 – 00:18
A medium shot shows many parked taxis and men standing and chatting; a female passenger gets out of one of them.

00:19 – 00:20
A medium shot shows a street-food shop.

00:21 – 00:27
A medium shot shows the same street-food shop from a different angle.

00:31- 0:34
A medium shot shows an electric generator running and connected to a gas canister.

00:35 – 01:01
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic/ interview transcript below

01:02 – 01:07
A medium shot shows Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner at work.

01:08- 01:10
A wide shot shows the façade of Daban Company for gas supply.

01:11- 00:14 A medium shot shows two men standing and another around gas canisters.

00:14 – 00:19
A pan right movement shows a man carrying a gas canister.

00: 20 – 00:34
Traveling shot from inside a taxi shows the car stopping to pick up a female passenger.

00:35-01:53
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver/ interview transcript below

01:54 – 02:06
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic/ interview transcript below

02:07 – 02:40
Interview with Ayman Seidam, a mechanic, Arabic/ interview transcript below

02:41- 03:35
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan/ interview transcript below

Interviews

00:35 – 01:01
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic
“Because of the gasoline shortage, you have to use propane to fuel electric generators and carry on with your work… There are power shortages that could last from six to seven hours and the power is on during the night while you cannot work. You have to use any alternative kind of fuel to keep working.”

00:35-01:53
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver
“I altered the car because of the gasoline shortage... In the past, we used to get gasoline through tunnels from Egypt, but they were closed about a year ago, so we switched to propane to save money.”

01:54 – 02:06
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic

-Do you know that this car is running on gas?

-Yes, I know.

-What do you think of that?

-This is normal, because there is no gasoline but [propane] is available.

02:07 – 02:40
Interview with Ayman Seidam, a mechanic, Arabic
“I am disconnecting the filter because I want to set the propane machine. It is not working properly. The propane machine does not change the engine; it only stops the flow of gasoline. Gasoline is expensive here, so people have to switch to using propane. We install a small device to pump propane instead of gasoline into the engine using the injection system. “This is the propane device. It is made in Turkey and called Fima.”

02:41- 03:35
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan, Arabic
“Altering taxis to make them run on propane is against the law, but due to the siege on the Gaza Strip and the large assault against the Palestinian people that comes with it, many taxi drivers are customizing their cars to make them run on propane. It is against the law and the ministry of transportation does allow the installation of propane pipes in cars because it is dangerous… for the passengers. The ministry of transportation, in cooperation with the traffic police, is trying to resolve this problem by monitoring people who buy propane pipes [used in altering vehicles].

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Gazans Use Propane to Fuel Cars
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
04 Nov 2014

November 4, 2014
Gaza, Palestinian Territories

The ongoing Israeli blockade on the Gaza Strip and the recent closure of most the tunnels used for smuggling goods from Egypt has led to a severe fuel shortage. As a result, some Gazans are modifying their car engines and generators to make them run on propane instead of gasoline. Propane is widely used for cooking in Gaza.

Shot list

00:00 - 00:03
A medium shot shows a billboard advertising a reconstruction project in 2013.

00:04 – 00:07
A wide shot shows cars drive past the same billboard.

00:08 – 00:15
A general shot shows cars driving in both directions on a main road in Gaza City.

00:16 – 00:21
A close shot shows the exhaust pipe of a taxi as it drives away.

00:22 – 00:36
A medium shot shows many parked taxis and men standing and chatting; a female passenger gets out of a taxi.

00:37 – 01:03
Several shots show a street-food shop from different angles.

01:04 – 01:20
Several shots show an electric generator running and connected to a gas canister outside a curtain store and men inside the store.

01:21 – 01:48
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic/ interview transcript below

01:49 – 01:53
A medium shot shows Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner at work.

01:54 – 02:09
Several shots show the Daban Company for gas supply from outside.

02:10 – 02:13
A medium shot shows two men standing and another moving around gas canisters.

02:14 – 02:30
A pan right movement shows a man carrying a gas canister.

02:31- 03:01
Several shots show stored gas canisters.

03:03 – 03:26
Several shots show vehicles being filled with fuel at gasoline stations.

03:27 – 03:39
Several shots show cars driving by on main roads.

03:40 – 03:54
A traveling shot from inside a taxi shows the car stopping to pick up a female passenger.

03:55 - 04:14
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver, Arabic / interview transcript below

04:15 - 04:28
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic/ interview transcript below

04:29 - 05:23
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver, Arabic / interview transcript below

05:24 – 05:37
Several shots show a car repair shop.

05:38 – 07:34
Interview with Aiman Seidam, male mechanic, Arabic/ interview transcript below

07:34 – 08:14
Several shots show a client driving his car into the repair shop and the mechanic Aiman Seidam working on the car.

08:15-08:46
Interview with Aiman Seidam, male mechanic, Arabic/ interview transcript below

08:47 – 09:26
A close shot shows the gas device installed on the engine while the mechanic explains how it works.
“This is the gas device, it is made in Turkey... It is connected to water pipes from the car and a gas pipe that can handle high pressure so it would not explode.”

09:27 – 10:12
A medium shot shows the mechanic Aiman Seidam standing next to the car.
“The gas device was not working properly so I am calibrating it.”

10:13 – 10:18
A wide shot shows the front of the car repair shop.

10:19 – 10:33
A tilt down movement shows the building of the Ministry of Transportation from outside.

10:34 – 10:41
A medium shot shows the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan, sitting behind his desk and talking on the phone.

10:42 – 10:46
A close shot shows al-Zayyan’s desk plaque.

10:47 – 12:40
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan, man, Arabic/ interview transcript below

Interviews

01:21 – 01:48
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic

“Because of the gasoline shortage, you have to use propane to fuel electric generators and carry on with your work… There are power shortages that could last from six to seven hours and the power is on during the night while you cannot work. You have to use any alternative kind of fuel to keep working.”

03:55 - 04:14
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver, Arabic
“I altered the car because of the gasoline shortage... In the past, we used to get gasoline through tunnels from Egypt, but they were closed about a year ago, so we switched to propaneto save money.”

04:15 - 04:28
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic

-Do you know that this car is running on gas? -Yes, I know. -What do you think of that? -This is normal, because there is no gasoline but [propane] is available.

04:29 - 05:23
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver, Arabic

“Today, a liter of Israeli gasoline costs 7 shekels [$1.85], it is expensive and drivers cannot afford it. Egyptian gasoline was sold for 3 or 3.5 shekels a liter. We were able to afford it and it was better for the car. But now we are forced to use propane. It is risky, but what can we do? We are under siege and things are out of our hands. The government turns a blind eye to altering cars because there is no alternative… there are no fines… There used to be Egyptian gasoline but now there is nothing. Only Israeli gasoline is available and it is very expensive.”

05:38 – 07:34
Interview with Aiman Seidam, male mechanic, Arabic

“Many people come to switch their car engines from gasoline to propane... [propane] devices come from Egypt and the road is closed, so the number of available devices is small. We can alter about two cars per week. The cost of altering a car depends on how much the propane device provider charges.
“People in Gaza started altering cars in 2007; the procedure used to cost 2,500 shekels. When propane devices became widely available the cost of altering cars dropped to 1,000 or 800 shekels. However, after the border crossing with Egypt was closed, the cost now varies between 900 and 1,000 shekels. “This is a propane device made in Turkey. You can connect the solenoid to it here. It does not affect the car’s mechanical system, but the propane that we are using is not suitable for cars. This is the solenoid, which complements the device. You can connect it here. “There could be risk if the person connects the device using ordinary propane tubes used for domestic purposes, which are usually blue or red. We use a special type of pipe, manufactured using high pressure.”

08:15-08:46
Interview with Aiman Seidam, male mechanic, Arabic

“I am disconnecting the filter because I want to set up the propane device. It is not working properly. The propane device does not change the engine; it only stops the flow of gasoline… We install a small device to pump propane into the engine instead of the gasoline injection system.”

10:47 – 12:40
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan, man, Arabic

“Altering taxis to make them run on propane is against the law, but due to the siege on the Gaza Strip and the large assault against the Palestinian people that comes with it, many taxi drivers are customizing their cars to make them run on propane. It is against the law and the ministry of transportation does allow the installation of propane pipes in cars because it is dangerous… for the passengers. The ministry of transportation, in cooperation with the traffic police, is trying to resolve this problem by monitoring people who buy propane pipes [used in altering vehicles].
“The [Israeli] occupation is mostly responsible for this problem because it does not allow allowing fuel and gasoline to enter the Gaza Strip, which has raised the price of gasoline. This adds to the ban on importing fuel from Egypt. This has largely affected the lives of Palestinian citizens… “When gasoline was imported from Egypt its price was not more than 3 shekels per liter. Now prices have gone up and the society in Gaza, which is poor and under siege, is being treated like the state of occupation [Israel], where there is a strong economy and a high income per capita.
“Israelis have very good living conditions in comparison with Palestinians, who probably live under the poverty line. Palestinians cannot afford these fuel prices.”

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FSA Dig Tunnels in Aleppo
Aleppo
By Antonio-Pampliega
14 Jul 2014

Aleppo, Syria

FSA Rebels dig a tunnel in a secret location in Aleppo and then use it to blow up a key Syrian Army checkpoint. Ten fighters from Ahfad al-Morsalin Liwad brigade worked 24 hours/day for 22 days to dig the tunnel in order to be able to attack one of the most important Syrian Army checkpoints in Aleppo. The video features the rebels working in the tunnel and then blowing up the army checkpoint.

Interview 1:
“These are buildings that contain residents who are the snipers of the Iranian militias. It is all a military arsenal here, and that is why we are digging underneath it.”

Interview 2:
“The champions were able to control al-Tarraf checkpoint and to destroy the artillery there and here are the shells coming from al-Hamidiya towards the liberated checkpoint, and they were also able to destroy two tanks in al-Dahman checkpoint, we were able to kill some of the regime thugs and other were able to escape to nearby checkpoints."

Rebels walking in the tunnel
Rebels working in the tunnel
Rebels digging with shovels
Rebels places light
Rebels digging with machine
Rebel placing stones in a box
The platform with stones moves along the rails
A rebel works at the top of the tunnel
stones machine digging earth
A rebel talking in the tunnel
Tunnel Explosion
A rebel talking outside of the tunnel

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Tunnels of Aleppo
By Antonio-Pampliega
11 Jul 2014

May 29-June 2, 2014
Aleppo, Syria

FSA Fighters dig a tunnel in a secret location in Aleppo and then use it to blow up a key Syrian Army checkpoint. Ten fighters from Ahfad al-Morsalin Liwad brigade worked 24 hours per day, for 22 days to dig the tunnel. The tunnel was then used to attack one of the most important Syrian Army checkpoints in Aleppo. These photos show the digging process and the moment of the attack on the Syrian Army checkpoint.

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Xanti Mortu
By Andrea Falletta
07 Aug 2013

One of the mine's tunnels dug at a depth of 450 meters below the sea level. 30 km of tunnels were built in the mine.

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Trekking in a 20 million year old rai...
Madeira, Portugal
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
15 Jun 2013

The water necessities "ordered" two century's ago islanders to open tunnels deep inside the volcanic island.

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The Pilgrimage (7 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

In the 1500s, King Lalibela had 11 churches hewn from a 'mother rock' in order to create a holy place underground safe for pilgrims to worship and evade detection. The result was so captivating that the first European to enter the site wrote "I am weary of writing more about these buildings, because it seems to me that I shall not be believed if I write more." Lalibela's vision ensured continued worship for hundreds of years, with masses of the pious still congregating each Christmas. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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The Pilgrimage (6 of 29)
Lalibela, Ethiopia
By Leyland Cecco
29 Dec 2012

Narrow tunnels underneath the churches and within the mountain connect the churches, and as the number of pilgrims swell dramatically with Christmas approaching, the passages become an increasingly tight traverse. Stories of long treks echo off the cool stone, with one pilgrim sharing a story of his group's barefoot journey of more than 8 days in order to reach Lalibela. As so many villages are within reach, more than 60,000 pilgrims descend on the churches each Christmas. Bet Giyorgis is one of the most important pilgrimage sites for one of the oldest Christian sects in the world, the Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. Lalibela, Ethiopia. December 2012.

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Sinai Collection August 2012
Rafah, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
12 Aug 2012

Collection of videos from ongoing events in the Sinai, Egypt. Starting with coverage about the 16 border guards killed, reactions of the Egyptian military, President Morsi, people of the region, and Gaza, as well as events that followed.

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Editor's Picks for 10 Aug 2012
Sinai, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
10 Aug 2012

Video Footage from the Sinai showing tunnels and the Egyptian military heading to seal them off.

Photo collection from the Bekaa Valley, Lebanon, showing refugee families from Syria.

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Egypt Military Sends Heavy Equipment ...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
08 Aug 2012

Egypt’s army started on Thursday, August 9, sending heavy equipment on large trucks to Rafah, North Sinai, to start sealing off the smuggling tunnels between Egypt’s Rafah and the besieged Gaza Strip.

The move comes in reaction to the recent bloody attacks by gunmen that killed 16 army soldiers and injured at least seven.

The trucks were loaded with armored vehicles, rock drillers, tractors, cranes and other heavy equipment to be used for sealing off the smuggling tunnels.

Security sources at Rafah Border Crossing said that the military forces would continue sealing off those tunnels in the coming few days, stressing that they posed a constant threat to Egypt’s national security.

Security officials also said that there were about 1,200 smuggling tunnels between Egypt and Gaza Strip, and the giant equipment that were brought in would be used for sealing them off.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCSS
Shooting Dateline: August 9, 2012
Shooting Location: Rafah, North Sinai, Egypt
Publishing Time: August 9, 2012
Length: 0:01:39
Video Size: 81.4 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Various shots of large trucks transferring armored vehicles with army soldiers on the top of them
2. Various shots of armored vehicles touring the main roads in North of Sinai
3. Various shots of large trucks heading to the North of Sinai while transferring armored vehicles
4. Various shots of trucks carrying heaving equipment, brought to begin sealing off the smuggling tunnels between Egypt and the Gaza Strip

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Gold rush in the heart of Mozambique ...
Manica, Mozambique
By palyizsofi
24 Jan 2011

They are washing the soil, day and night, hoping that it hides gold. Seventy to eighty percent of all prospectors arrive illegally from the neighboring country of Zimbabwe. The nuggets, belonging to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants. The state is left with the ground and river water no more suitable for drinking nor watering, along with the treatment of the gold diggers' damaged health. Gold rush in Manica, in the heart of Mozambique.

They are digging at a depth of 15 to 20 meters under the ground, in an extensive tunnel system.

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Illegal Gold Mines Indonesia
Banyuwangi, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
13 Jan 2011

Fellow gold miner Supar accompanies Ali as he enters the tunnel.