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Cambodian Woman 03
Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
27 Feb 2015

Ey was shouted daily by her husband and did not report abuse.

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Cambodian Woman 04
Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
27 Feb 2015

Ey working outside his home in the province of Tboung Khmom

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Cambodian Woman 06
Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
27 Feb 2015

Kraen endured daily beatings from her alcoholic husband without reporting, even when provoked inflammation of the head and wounds.

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Cambodian Woman 01
Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
27 Feb 2015

Kraen and her husband have reconciled after a group therapy. Divorce is difficult to achieve in Cambodia. "I asked for divorce several times, but he did not agree," she says.

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Cambodian Woman 05
Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
27 Feb 2015

Ey and her husband earn less than two dollars a day. He uses to spend all the money on alcohol and yelling to her when they had nothing to eat. She was so desperate that began to hit their children. "I tore the branches of trees and beat them. Sometimes I threw them my own shoes, but did not want to hurt them" she says.

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Child Labor in Southeast Asia 08
Chiang Mai, Thailand
By Stephane Grasso
27 Feb 2015

Two young boys transport flowers from a small field in Chiang Mai, Thailand

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Child Labor in Southeast Asia 09
Chiang Mai, Thailand
By Stephane Grasso
27 Feb 2015

Young construction worker on break at a the site of a future hotel in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

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Child Labor in Southeast Asia 10
Chiang Mai, Thailand
By Stephane Grasso
27 Feb 2015

Little girl assisting her parents on a construction site in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

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Child Labor in Southeast Asia 06
Loi Ta Leng, Myanmar
By Stephane Grasso
06 Feb 2015

Young soldier at the Shan State Army (South) National Day in Loi Ta Leng, Myanmar.

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Child Labor in Southeast Asia 05
Samut Sakhon, Thailand
By Stephane Grasso
31 Jan 2015

Teenage boy ending his night shift from a factory in Samut Sakhon, Thailand.

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Child Labor in Southeast Asia 07
Samut Sakhon, Thailand
By Stephane Grasso
31 Jan 2015

Young teen working at the Samut Sakhon fish market in Samut Sakhon, Thailand.

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Child Labor in Southeast Asia 03
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Stephane Grasso
09 Jan 2015

Child selling items in the street in Kathmandu, Nepal.

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My Son's Birth, Through my Lens
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By George Nickels
27 Dec 2014

If you’re a man in Cambodia, being present at the birth of your child is widely frowned upon. As both the prospective father and a camera-wielding photo-journalist, attending and documenting the birth of my son was a challenge, to say the least.

At 8pm on 26 December 2014, my partner of nearly nine years alerted me that her water had broken. She started to have her first contractions, but we were advised to stay home, get some food and rest, and wait it out until the morning.

By 7am and after a sleepless night, the intensity of Madeline’s contractions reached a peak every ten minutes; it was time to leave. Descending seven flights of stairs from our apartment in Phnom Penh, we hailed a remork (tuk tuk) to take us across the city on a journey that would change our lives forever. As is common in the capital city, the driver said he knew where to go, (which meant no, I don’t, please tell me), so with the limited Khmer that I knew, and ten minutes trying to explain where the clinic was, we came to an agreement and departed.

For twenty minutes, in a rickety wooden carriage towed by a 125cc motorcycle, on substandard roads, we careered through early morning city traffic on with Madeline panting heavily all the way to the clinic. On arrival, Doctors and midwives monitored the baby’s heartbeat, and then lead us to the room that we had pre booked, ready for Madeline to start the first stages of labour.

For the next four hours, the intensity in the room increased tenfold; I watched as the midwives coached Madeline with every technique in the book to ease her pain and mental state. Encouraging deep breathing and keeping her calm was part of my support role .When the staff decided she was ready, my partner told me to grab my camera. She was screaming as they wheeled her upstairs to the delivery room, and I realized I was about to begin documenting the birth of my son.

From a photographer’s point of view, taking photographs of my woman giving birth was not easy. She was in a lot of discomfort and pain, so trying document this, whilst retaining her dignity, was both mentally and physically draining.

There were other factors I had to take into consideration. Room to move was at a premium; I was in a small delivery room with six medical staff and a pregnant woman, so gaining the trust of the midwives and doctors was essential. Lighting conditions were very harsh, and Madeline was constantly moving from one chair to another, from standing to sitting, and from crouching and crawling positions.

The majority of the time I was supporting my partner and wishing for a safe and problem free delivery, and she says she can only recall one moment of me taking photographs from the entire labour. Madeline was having very heavy contractions whilst kneeling on the floor on her hands and knees. My natural instinct as a photographer kicked in, and as I lay on my back in front of her, pointing the camera at her pain stricken face, I composed the frame and took the photograph. This was the only point in the delivery when my partner told me to stop taking photos and to hold her hands!

The images shown were taken in the last three hours of a fairly short seven-hour natural labour, and at 1.50 p.m. on the 27th of December, we were blessed with our first son, Frank Nickels.

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Child Labor Tourism 01
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Viku Tupse is 9 years old. Among the trash, he found a broken face of Mickey Mouse. He knows that this will pull on the heartstrings of tourists and puts it on the head. He does not understand why tourists visit the garbage dump where he works, but he likes the candies that they give him. He has lived in the landfill for two years.

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Child Labor Tourism 02
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists is lead through the landfill in Siem Reap, Cambodia where many children work sorting trash.

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Child Labor Tourism 03
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Sau Srey Neang is 11 years old and has three brothers and one sister younger. She has gone over a half a year without hearing from her father, who went to work to Thailand. She knows that her family needs help, but she wants to continue studying to be a teacher. This is her first year working in the landfill.

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Child Labor Tourism 04
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists disturb children working in the garbage dump of Anlong Pi while the children are resting. The tourists, visiting this landfill as part of their package vacation to Cambodia, take pictures of the children with their cameras and phones. Their tour route offers a visit to the garbage dump where children work alongside adults in extreme poverty and dangerous conditions, allowing them to take pictures with the children. The landfill is located a few kilometers from Siem Reap, the most famous tourist destination in Cambodia, for the temples of Angkor.

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Child Labor Tourism 05
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Hael Kemra is 15 years old. In the future she wants to be an English teacher. She began working at the dump at 10 years old. Her mother took her to the garbage dump to earn money when her father abandoned them.

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Child Labor Tourism 06
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Children and their parents, all are landfill workers. They scavenge in the trash and look for recyclable materials inside the garbage dump with a metal hook attached to a wooden stick, walking behind a bulldozer. Tons of waste arrive daily to garbage dump of Anlong Pi from the tourist destination of Siem Reap. Largely for economic reasons, children are forced to work at the landfill by their parents. Some study in the mornings, and in the afternoons they will work at the landfill.

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Child Labor Tourism 07
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A Japanese tourist gets his picture taken with children working in the garbage dump by his hiking mates. Tourists take pictures and give candies to children. This group of Japanese tourist are medical students who have come to the dump Anlog Pi on their tour rote.

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Child Labor Tourism 08
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Lia Neang Syer is 14 years old. She began working in the garbage dumb at 10 years old. She could not continue studying, because she had no money to pay for books and extra lessons. She has two sisters and one younger brother, and her mother also works at the garbage dump. She does not like the job, but she is forced to work because her family needs the money to live. Behind her, other children look for plastic and metal to sell.

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Child Labor Tourism 09
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

The inhabitants of landfills burn some of the waste they receive because it is impossible to recycle all of it, and space is limited. Toxic gases are unbearable, and soil and groundwater are contaminated. Some locals fall sick due to the continuous intake of toxic gases.

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Child Labor Tourism 10
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A Japanese tourist covers her mouth with her hands because she can't bear the strong smell that this mountain of toxic waste and decaying food generates. She does this without putting down the iphone with which she takes pictures. Some children living and working in the landfill laugh at her.

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Child Labor Tourism 11
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Meas Chan, 10, looks for recyclable materials inside the garbage dump. Tons of waste arrive daily to garbage dump of Anlong Pi from the tourist destination of Siem Reap. He walks behind a bulldozer driven by his father, while his younger brother looks at him. About 50 under-aged children work in the garbage dump according to available data.

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Child Labor Tourism 12
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Suy Sokhon is 16 years old, and has gone two years without going to school. Her parents can not afford the costs of books and tuition. She has worked in the landfill from 12 years of age.

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Child Labor Tourism 13
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

While Sueun Chany, 12, carries large bags of trash from one side of the garbage dump to the other, a tourist waits to take pictures of children alongside their peers who have arrived by Tuk-Tuk. Foreign tourist visit the Anlong Pi garbage dump as part of their holiday in Cambodia.

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Child Labor Tourism 14
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump, most of whom have come with their families from different regions of the country to work.

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Child Labor Tourism 15
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists leave on the bus that brought them to the garbage dump of Anlong Pi. Children say goodbye to tourists, hoping to receive more sweets or some money. Tourists continue taking pictures as they say goodbye to the children and residents of the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 16
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of Japanese tourists take pictures of the landfill. Tourists are informed of these visits by word of mouth or directly with local tour guides in the hotels where they stay.

Families working in the landfill do not say anything about the tours. They are silent. The landfill is controlled by a private company that decides who works or does not work at the Anlong Pi, and the company benefits from these tours.

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Child Labor Tourism 17
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Kon Mai, 15, stands atop a mountain of garbage from which he looks defiantly towards a group of tourists. He started to work in the garbage dump at 12 years-old. He had to leave school because his parents constantly travel from one place to another in the country, or even outside Cambodia, looking for work to support him and his five young brothers. His parents now also work at the garbage dump. At home, he faces domestic violence, and he wants to leave as soon as possible. In the future, he would like to work in construction.

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Child Labor Tourism 18
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A truck from GAEA, the company in charge of landfill Anlong Pi, arrives at the landfill full of garbage from Siem Reap. From dawn to dusk, for a minimum of 12 hours per day, people working in the landfill, children and adults, scavenge through tons of waste, looking for recyclable materials or any items with value that can be sold like plastic, paper, copper, glass, etc. to eek out a living.

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Child Labor Tourism 19
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump with their families from different regions of the country.

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Child Labor Tourism 20
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Japanese tourists cover their faces with masks to avoid breathing in toxins or bacteria. One woman takes photos of children working in the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 21
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

More than 50 minors work in this garbage dump with their families from different regions of the country.

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Child Labor Tourism 22
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

The increase in tourism has generated an increase of garbage in Siem Reap. This situation has worsened conditions for families living and working in Anlong Pi. The landfill is being expanded by GAEA. This company earns big money with the business of garbage and recycling.

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Child Labor Tourism 23
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Kon Mai is 15 years old. He had to leave school because his parents constantly travel from one place to another in the country, or even outside Cambodia, looking for work to support him and his five young brothers. His parents now also work at the garbage dump. At home, he faces domestic violence, and he wants to leave as soon as possible. In the future, he would like to work in construction.

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Child Labor Tourism 24
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

A group of tourists leave on the bus that brought them to the garbage dump of Anlong Pi. Children say goodbye to tourists, hoping to receive more sweets or some money. Tourists continue taking pictures as they say goodbye to the children and residents of the garbage dump.

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Child Labor Tourism 25
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By David Rengel
07 Nov 2014

Sigen Rathy is 12 years old. She returns to work as the tourists leave the landfill after their tour. She wants to be a doctor in the future. Working alongside her parents, she earns about 4000 rieles daily, or just under one dollar.

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Stateless Vietnamese in Cambodia: A Q...
Phum Kandal
By vincenzo floramo
11 Aug 2014

Thou Yien Son, 61, lives his life on water. His house is a precarious wooden platform tied to a bamboo raft and his income comes from his boat, which he uses to catch fish to sell at the local market. Yien Son doesn't have anything else, not even citizenship. He is one of the 700,000 ethnic Vietnamese living in Cambodia, a country that considers these individuals as illegal immigrants, despite them having lived in the country for generations.

Most of the ethnic Vietnamese arrived in Cambodia during the French Protectorate (1863- 1953) to work in administrative positions in the countryside. In 1975, Khmer Rouge took power and Vietnamese citizens were forcibly deported to Vietnam or killed. During exile, most of them lost the papers that proved their Cambodian origin. At their return in the 1980's, they were considered as immigrants and became stateless.

Without papers, the ethnic Vietnamese cannot buy land and most of them dwell on floating villages in the Tonle Sap, Southeast Asia’s largest freshwater lake. One of those villages is Yien Son's Phum Kandal. “I came back because my grandparents and my parents were born and died here. This is my land”, said Yien Son. He also complained that the Vietnamese are also subjected to arbitrary taxes and extortion from local authorities.

But there is one hope. On the 30th of July The Khmer Rouge Tribunal opened a new case against the top leaders of the regime that will judge, among other crimes, the genocide and deportation of the Vietnamese community in Cambodia. More than 40 ethnic Vietnamese representatives will participate as civil parties and they will try to regain their lost citizenship as reparation. This same tribunal recently condemned Nuon Chea, the second most senior leader in the Khmer Rouge, and Khieu Samphan, head of State, to life prison for crimes against humanity.