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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

A child playing with child dog inside ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

School children playing near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
06 Jan 2015

Shipyard workers near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 17
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 19
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 20
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

An old ship is maneuvered into place in a shipyard outside Dhaka where it will be either repaired or dismantled for parts and scrap metal.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 22
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 27
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
05 Jan 2015

A child plays with her dog inside a ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 24
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

A child plays with her dog inside a ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 25
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

A child plays with her dog inside a ship recycling yard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. A primary school is situated near this yard, and children make their way to their classes using a dangerous path inside the shipyard, some of them using it as a playground, though a dangerous one.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 26
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

About 15,000 people work in extremely dangerous conditions and earn between $4 and $5 as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common. Shipyard workers say make very meager earnings, without proper safety, and surrounded by the smell of asbestos.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 28
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

Young children, mostly climate refugees from flooded areas of the country, work in the shipyards, collecting scrap metal and used oil to sell in local markets.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 16
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 18
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

A mid-size vessel sits in a boatyard outside Dhaka among old ships, ripe for recycling. Bangladesh is now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market, building vessels for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 21
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

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Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 23
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
04 Jan 2015

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

Life in ship recycling yard in bangla...
Dhaka
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

School children near ship recycling yard in Dhaka.There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions earn Tk. 300-400 BDT (1 USD = 78 BDT) as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.Most of the private shipyards use plate, engine, component and machinery of old merchant ship collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh. But frequent accident and heavy human causalities of inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards.Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market. The vessels were built for countries including Denmark, Germany and Finland. Bangladesh shipbuilding is being compared with giants such as China, Japan and South Korea.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 14
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Frequent accidents and heavy human causalities on inland vessels often raise question about the quality of ships produced in local shipyards. Bangladesh are now exporting small and medium-sized ships for the highly competitive European market.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 02
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

About 15,000 people are working in extremely dangerous conditions as they don't get safety gear from the dock owners and accidents are common.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 01
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Shipyard workers pose for the camera in a year near the Buriganga River in Dhaka. There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 11
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

A shipyard worker gets prepared to weld near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 09
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Two men are hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Most of the private shipyards use plate steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 07
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Dec 2014

Most of the private shipyards use plate steel, engines, components and machinery from old merchant ships collected from many ship recycling industries located in Bangladesh.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

There are more than 35 shipyards in Old Dhakas Keraniganj area in the bank of the river Burigonga, where small ships, launches and steamers are built and repaired around the clock.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 08
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A man is hard at work welding metal in a shipyard near the Buriganga River in Dhaka.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 05
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

17 year-old Ashraful has seen several of his colleagues fall victim to explosions, caused by ruptures in gas cylinders. He breaks down the rusty, old supertankers, cargo ships and cruisers to be scrapped. Most of them live by eating rice and vegetables. Ashraful cannot remember when he last ate meat.

Bangladesh's Shipbuilding Industry 15
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
29 Dec 2014

A boy stops to pose for a photo while playing near a ship recycling yard in Dhaka.

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Rumah Singgah: A Home for Jakarta's A...
Depok, Greater Jakarta, Indonesia
By Elisabetta Zavoli
01 Mar 2014

Photo essay and video Video length - 7:01 "Rumah Singgah" literally means “shelter house." A project developed by Mami Yulie (aka Yulianus Rettoblaut), the 53 year-old leader of the Indonesian waria (transgender) community, the shelter hosts elderly transgender with no means of living on their own for free. 'Waria' is literally a combination of the words wanita meaning woman and pria, man. At Rumah Singgah, they create a sort of microcosm, a small community ruled by tight family-like bonds. Rumah Singgah is also Mami Yulie's home, where she lives with her own family: her foster children, her husband and sometimes her relatives.

Almost all waria in Indonesia are chased away from their families of origin when relatives find out they are transgender people. When they are young they can survive thanks to prostitution, but when they become old and sick, many are left without others to help care for them. Rummah Singgah is a space where elderly waria care for each other and are looked after by Mami Yulie and the shelter's caretaker.

“When I was at school, I used to play with the girls. I used to draw flowers, houses, weird stuff…. When I grew up and become an adult, my parents understood that I was a transgender so I was chased from home," said Mumun, the 68-year-old caretaker of Rumah Singgah. "I was ordered to go away. They didn’t want their son to be a transgender. My parents disowned me asking me to leave the house. I was beaten up with wood and bamboo sticks and fell down in the rice field. I was beaten up there, so I ran away. I left. I took a train to Bogor. When I arrived I didn’t have relatives to go to nor did I know anybody”, she said.

This is a common situation among many “waria” in Indonesia. Most of their stories starts like that of Mumun: they experienced exclusion and abandonment by their families when they came out as transgender. Their new life, the choice of becoming who they feel themselves to be, always starts on the street. Waria people consider themselves women trapped in men’s bodies. They say that their soul and heart are that of a woman, so a waria is a man with a woman’s soul. Becoming transgender is not a choice for them. It comes from the heart. Many people in Indonesia think if someone hangs out with a group of transgender, he/she can become a transgender. This only furthers the stigmatization of the waria, many of whom already live under precarious circumstances.

“The problem in the waria community is that people forget there are many old transgender," said Mami Yulie. "This is a problem because when they get sick or die, they don’t have a proper place for burial. The community rejects them. They are taken to the police, who take them to hospital and bury them in a mass grave. This happens again and again, and it prompts me to think that I have the responsibility to help them."

When transgender become old, making a living becomes very hard for them. “I am sixty eight year old now. I am too old to make a living in the evening. I am not sellable anymore,” Mumun said.

In Rumah Singgah, a lot of elderly waria have been helped to become independent, to improve their skills and to be able to create a home industry. However, the shelter’s capacity is limited. Only about ten to fifteen people can be accommodated according to a rotation system. If there are five or ten people coming in, five or ten people must leave. The great challenge of this project is to find enough financial support to pay for food, medicine, electricity and water for them all: and the transgender community in Jakarta has eight hundred and thirty one elderly waria who need to be taken care of. Residents also pray and practice their own religion at the shelter house. This vital time helps them prepare for the day when they will die. They can share their thoughts: at the shelter house, their main job is to provide peer support to each other. This process helps to create new strong family-like bonds between them, and the tiny community becomes a new big family for people who often have no one left in their life.

Mami Yulie, originally born in Merauke, Papua, moved to Jakarta when she was chased from her family home. She began her life in Jakarta working on the street as a prostitute, where she met her partner fifteen years ago. Since then they have been inseparable. Mami Yulie was the first Indonesian transgender to graduate at University. Leaving the street life behind, her biological family welcomes her again. They come to visit her and stay in Rumah Singgah from time to time.

“At this age, I have been given a long life," Mami Yulie said. "I was able to study, to appear on TV, to go in and out of government offices. This wouldn’t be possible without the will of God. He is the only one to help, me because I believe there is nothing impossible in God’s name."