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Kobane Drone Footage Highlights (Trai...
Kobane
By Joe Lukawski
04 Oct 2015

Video shot between October 5 and December 10, 2015.
Drone footage showing reconstruction efforts in the Kurdish city of Kobane, on the Syrian border with Turkey. Workers and machinery remove debris in the areas that were destroyed during intense fighting between Kurdish forces and Islamic State militants. In the outskirts of the city, refugee camps were set up for people who fled Raqqa, the capital of the so called Islamic State.

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Kobane Clashes
Turkish-Syria border
By Ibrahim Husseini
25 Jun 2015

Video shot from the Turkish side of the border showing smoke rising over Kobane, Syria as Kurdish YPG forces clash with Islamic State fighters.

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Family Returns to Recaptured Kobane V...
Kobane, Syria
By Bedir
16 Feb 2015

The Rashad Muslim family returns to their village of Qara Maga, east of Kobane, after it was recently recaptured by Kurdish YPG and YPJ forces from ISIS. While the city of Kobane has fallen to Kurdish forces, many of the surrounding villages remain under the control of ISIS and Kurdish forces are now in the midst of campaign capture the villages as well. 

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Together in Kobane: Former Refugee Re...
Kobane
By Bedir
10 Feb 2015

Kobani, Syria
February 10, 2015

After leaving her hometown of Kobani and living in Turkey for several months, Siddiqa Barkal was happily reunited with her husband and two sons who remained in the city to fight against ISIS. Siddiqa’s three daughters and her youngest son were also rejoiced to return with her.
Siddiqa’s husband, Ismat Sheikh Hassan, is the head of the Defense Committee in the Kobani Canton, part of the autonomous district proclaimed by the Kurdish Democratic Union Party, known by the Kurdish acronym PYD. He was widely quoted by Western media during the battle for Kobani.
Siddiqa says that she was very sad to leave her hometown and live in exile, despite the warm welcome she received in Turkey. She took the risk of returning to Kobani even before ISIS fighters were defeated because her young children could not bear living outside their city.
In Kobani, Siddiqa stood by her husband, sons and other fighters of the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) during the battles and made them food until they won over the battle against ISIS.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of family in living room

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Woman) Siddiqa Barkal, Refugee Who Returned to Kobani

01:01 - 09:45

“We left when ISIS attacked Kobani on [September] 20. We did not leave willingly. We wanted to stay in Kobani and live with the comrades and fighters. We wanted to be martyred with them. Seven days after I left Kobani with my children, they convinced me of returning. We returned but could not enter. My children and I stayed in Suruc. They did not tolerate to live outside Kobani. They kept saying that they wanted to return. I had three girls and a young boy with me. Even though my children could not live outside of Kobani, the situation there did not allow us to return. The father of my children and two of my children were fighting in the city. The rest of my children and I were very worried about them. My young son Hamza used to cry and say, ‘I cannot stand living outside Kobani because my friends are not here. I feel lonely when I am outside my city.’ In Suruc, my children and I were living in a house. My children never left the house during the day. On certain days, they used to sleep during the day and stay up at night watching television. On the 25th of the month, my older daughter went to Kobani. She called me, saying, ‘I cannot take it anymore. My father and two brothers are in Kobani and I need to go and see them. I want to stay in my city, Kobani.’
“I had many friends and acquaintances in northern Turkey who offered to let me live in their homes. I went near to Kobani on several occasions. My young son and I cried as smoke was rising from the buildings. The sound of explosions and gunshots was heard. Warplanes were bombing and the city was being destroyed. We were very worried about our friends who were fighting to defend the city. One day, I decided to return to Kobani while ISIS mercenaries were still there. I called my daughter then to tell her that we were coming and she told her father. My husband called me, saying: ‘Why did you not tell us that you were coming?’ I returned to Kobani and he was very happy. Some were worried that my children would be affected by the scenes of killing and destruction. There were also worried that ISIS was still there. “I used to make dinner for the fighters on the front and help them. We never thought that ISIS could have control over us. Many people used to ask me whether Kobani will fall or not. I used to say to them that Kobani will never fall and that it shall be victorious. 'We will fight until the last drop of our blood and the last stone in the city.’ I kept saying this to the women and mothers. The ideas of leader Abdullah Ocalan were behind the victory. Male and female fighters are fighting by relying on their own capabilities and conviction. They were not pushed by anyone; they were not forced to do this. They are fighting with their hearts, which is why they will achieve victory. For example, when you make a child carry something, he will carry it but he might fail. If he carries it with his own will and strength, he will succeed. The young men and women came from all parts of Kurdistan. We consider the member of the People’s Protection Units and the Women’s Protection Units our sons and daughters and parts of our bodies. They are sacrificing their lives for their land, which is why we will achieve victory. “I cannot describe the way I felt when we returned to Kobani. We felt so much joy. My little son Hamza was thrilled because he returned to his friends. I asked my son on our way back, ‘Who do you want to see first, your brothers or your father?’ He said: ‘I want to return to my friends.’ Friendship is more important for him. When I was in Kobani, I was very happy to see the comrade fighters. I did not believe that I was actually with them, and that I was embraced by Kobani. When the comrade fighters liberated Kobani from ISIS mercenaries, I was trembling. I was so happy that I did not understand what was happening. I asked a woman near me: ‘Am I in Kobani? Has it been liberated?’ “I cannot describe the joy I felt. When I left Kobani, I felt as if one of my sons or the father of my children was martyred. We all cried when we left. Even my young son went to the comrades and held their hands, saying: ‘I want to stay in Kobani and be martyred.’ When I left Kobani, I was told that I would return in seven days. My son was fighting on the eastern front, where battles were the fiercest. I did not tell anyone that I was leaving. When my son heard about it he said: ‘Mother, why are you leaving?’ I told him that I was not leaving willingly, and that I was leaving because the comrades wanted me to. When I left, I did not bid my sons farewell. It was a very painful moment. I cannot forget that moment. The moment I crossed the border was very painful. I cannot describe it. “Now that Kobani has been liberated, people will return to the city in the next few weeks. Those whose houses were destroyed will rebuild their houses. We have to help each other, take care of ourselves and return to our previous lives. We will live a happy life. Rojava [Syrian part of Kurdistan] will be fully liberated from ISIS mercenaries, especially that they were defeated in Kobani. The People’s Protection Units and the Women’s Protection Units have pledged to fight ISIS wherever they were. We, the people, should help the members of these forces who are sacrificing their lives for the homeland.”

Various of family inside the house
Various of young Hamza
Various of family and guests in front of the house

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Returning to Kobane
Kobane
By Bedir
07 Feb 2015

After four months of war and siege, residents of the Syrian city of Kobani have begun returning to the city to see what is left of their homes. 

The fighting left %50 of the city destroyed and for many, there is little left to come home to. While residents salvage the remains of their homes, the battle continues in the surrounding villages between the Kurdish YPG and ISIS.

Syrian photographer Massoud Mohamad accompanied the returning residents to document their journey. 

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Returning to Kobani 03
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
07 Feb 2015

An unexploded shell sits in a hole in the pavement in Kobane. Unexploded ordinance and booby-traps remain a danger in the recently recaptured city.

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Defiant People of Kobane Return to De...
Kobane
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

Kobane , Syria
February 6, 2015

Large numbers of Kurdish refugees returned from the Turkish city of Suruc to their hometown of Kobane .
ISIS withdrew from the city in late January under the weight of attacks from Kurdish fighters and airstrikes by international coalition.
Video shows refugees queuing to enter Kobane through a border crossing and walking amid the rubble and others cheering for Kurdish fighters.

Two interviewed returning refugees said that they are determined to stay in Kobane and that they are not scared of ISIS. Video also shows large-scale destruction in the city.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Wide of family walking amid destroyed buildings
Wide of boy carrying large bag
Various of refugees queuing to enter Kobane

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Woman) Unnamed refugee returning to Kobane
01:33 – 02:24
God willing, we shall achieve victory. We could no longer bear living in the tents, so we returned to Kobane because it is our land. We will never abandon Kobane because it is our honor. We will live amid this destruction. We will set up tents and live in Kobane . We are not afraid of ISIS. We used to be scared of it before, but now, we are not scared of anyone. Whoever wants to come, let them come. We are not scared of ISIS or anyone else.”
Various of refugees queueing at border crossing
Wide of refugees standing next to fighter
Wide of refugees walking through into Kobane
Wide of fighters

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Man) Unnamed refugees returning to Kobane
03:50 – 04:25

“I am from Kobane , and now I return to my city. I am returning to my land and hometown. Long live the YPG [Kurdish People’s Protection Units]. Long live the leader Abdullah Ocalan. Kobane has overcome terrorism. I am not scared. I am now returning to Kobane , the city of resistance.”

Various of people in pickup trucks cheering for Kurdish fighters
Wide of destroyed house and car
Wide of destroyed homes

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Returning to Kobani 02
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

Municipal workers in the city Kobane are in the process of cleaning up the city from the remains of the bodies of dead IS fighters.

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Returning to Kobani 07
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

A general view of destroyed houses in Kobane after the city was fully recaptured by Kurdish forces.

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Returning to Kobani 05
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

A general view of Kobane shows the hill of "Meshteh Nour" from the north, after the liberation of city.

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Returning to Kobani 06
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

YPG flag on the east hill of Kobane after it was fully recaptured by Kurdish forces.

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Returning to Kobani 09
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

A YPG fighter stands on a hill overlooking Kobane.

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Returning to Kobani 10
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

A general view of Kobane after its recapture from ISIS forces.

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Returning to Kobani 11
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

Meshteh Nour hill after it was fully recaptured by Kurdish forces.

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Returning to Kobani 15
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

A general view of destroyed houses in Kobane.

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Returning to Kobani 14
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

A general view of destroyed houses in Kobane.

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Returning to Kobani 13
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

A wounded YPG fighter gets out of a truck in Kobane.

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Returning to Kobani 18
Kobani, Syria
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

A destroyed tank on "Meshteh Nour" hill.

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“Until the Last Drop of Blood”; Syria...
Hasaka
By TTM Contributor 33
01 Feb 2015

Hasaka, Syria
February 1, 2015

Dozens of Kurdish fighters killed in various battles were buried during a large ceremony at the Martyr Khelil Sarukhan cemetery in the city of Hasaka, northeast Syria.
There have been heavy battles between ISIS and the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) for several months, mostly centered in the city of Kobane. Unprecedented clashes also erupted on January 17 between the YPG and Syrian regime forces outside the city of Hasaka, killing more than 20 Kurdish fighters and civilians were killed in this fighting.
Hasaka is part of the autonomous region in Syria proclaimed in by the Democratic Union Party (PYD), the umbrella group with which the YPG is affiliated.
The PYD has been previously accused by members of Syrian opposition of collaborating with the Syrian regime.
This video shows the burial ceremony, during which families of killed fighters appear gathering, holding YPG flags and reading verses from the Quran. Video also includes interviews with a female Kurdish political militant and the wives of two fighters killed in battles with ISIS.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of Asayesh (Kurdish security force) members
Various of women weeping next to graves
Medium of boys watering plant on a grave
Wide of fighter talking to woman in the graveyard
Various of woman crying next to fighter’s grave
Wide of male and female fighters standing next to a grave
Wide of people at cemetery entrance
Various of children holding YPG flag in the cemetery
Wide of people at cemetery entrance
Various of mourners near the grave of Asayish member
Wide of graves
Wide of women sitting near a grave
Medium of woman reading Quran
Wide of a dug grave
Wide of people at cemetery entrance
Wide of female militants searching a woman at the entrance of cemetery
Various of cemetery entrance
Wide of convoy
Various of procession to carry bodies of fighters to the cemetery
Wide of coffin
Various of female fighters preparing for ceremony
Wide of people gathered at the entrance of cemetery
Wide of Nawal Kelo, Kurdish Political Militant

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Woman), Nawal Kelo, Kurdish Political Militant
04:49 - 07:06

“About the latest events in Rojava [Syrian part of Kurdistan], the Syrian regime was not convinced that the YPG was an umbrella for all the free people in Rojava and Syria, without consideration of religion or race. The regime did not acknowledge that the YPG will win against ISIS, which the regime has created, especially in Kobane. “The regime tried to relieve ISIS from pressure in Hasaka, thinking that it could have full control over the events. The regime wanted to destroy everyone and then destroy the YPG, but it was faced with strong fighting form the side of the YPG, which has also been strong in the face of ISIS. Many died from the regime’s side, also about 20 Kurdish civilians and fighters died. The YPG will protect the area and all of Syria, and it will not disappoint the public. ISIS is the creation of the Syrian regime and its former friend [Turkish President Recep Tayyip] Erdogan. At the end, they will taste their own medicine and they will be forced to acknowledge the power of the Kurdish people and its free will, which are above all other laws.”
“The resistance and victory in Kobane proved to the world the free will of the Kurdish people as well as the rest of the Syrian population. We will lead ourselves. We have institutions lead by the Kurdish administration; we have councils and military forces. We will resist until the last drop of blood. Our people have free will and are bonded to their land. Those who do not have free will or a higher aim are ISIS and the Syrian regime.”

Various of Zouzan, Female Asayish Member whose husband was killed in a battle with ISIS

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Woman) Zouzan, Female Asayish Member whose husband was killed in a battle with ISIS
07:18 – 08:28

“I am a member of the Asayish, the Kurdish security forces, and the wife of martyr Hoker. I carried my husband's weapon after he died and swore to continue his fight until we clean Rojava from ISIS and the regime. I have children, and I insist to avenge my husband and defend my country and my land, we will fight until the last drop of blood.” “I do not know why everyone is against us, Kurds. They want to take our women, kill our children, evict us, murder us. We are Kurds and Muslims. What do they want from us? With the blood of our martyrs we will destroy the terrorists, and live safely and freely.”

Medium of Zouzan, Female Asayish Member whose husband was killed in a battle with ISIS
Various of Salma Muhammad, the widow of a fighter killed during a battles with ISIS

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Salma Muhammad, the widow of a fighter was killed by ISIS
08:49 – 09:50

“What is happening is not in ISIS’ interest. If ISIS goes a step or two in the direction of Rojava, especially Qamishli, the young and adults will carry weapons. We will not leave them. We will resist in the west of Kurdistan. The regime should recall what the sacrifices and martyrs offered by the Kurds to revive Syria. Now, we want Syrian to be a democratic nation. We are not demanding independence. Why are these martyrs falling? Each martyr… we send a thousand salutes to the leader Abdullah Ocalan – salutes that bear the scent of martyrs’ blood. ‘Apo’ should know that we are sacrificing to have democracy according to his great ideas. We do not accept any other form of democracy.”

Cutaway – medium of Salma Muhammad
Various of burial
Wide of group carrying flags

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Kobane Coming Soon
Suruç
By Felipe Passolas
08 Dec 2014

Trailer about the situation in the Turkish Kurdistan Border with Syria. Refugees and war in Kobane

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Training Women Fighters of the Kurdis...
Qamishle, Syria
By TTM Contributor 4
13 Nov 2014

Qamishle, Syria
November 8, 2014

Kurdish women have had a leading role in defending Kobane against ISIS. More than 1,000 women are actively involved in the fight, according to Heboun Derik, an official in the Women’s Protection Units (YPJ), the women’s branch in the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) militia.

This video shows life inside a training camp in the Kurdish-majority city of Qamishli in northeast Syria. In this camp, young women in their twenties leave the comfort of civilian life behind them to receive basic military training before they head to Kobane, one Syria’s fiercest frontlines.

Shot list:

00:00 – 01:25

Various shots show female fighters during field training.

01:26 – 01:48

Various shots show fighters during shooting practice.

01:49 – 02:17

Various shots show marching fighters, returning from the training field.

02:18 – 02:56
Various shots show fighters during lunch.

02:57 - 03:18
Various shots shows fighters dancing dabkeh.

03:19 – 03:49

Interview with 26-year-old trainer Furat, woman, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

03:50 – 04:17
Interview with Gulistan, the head of a 20-fighter unit in the YPJ, woman, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

04:18 – 05:04

Interview with Dijla, a female fighter, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

Interview with Gulistan, the head of a 20-fighter unit in the YPJ, woman, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

“I am 20 years old. I volunteered with the YPJ a year and a half ago. After I received my baccalaureate, I did not want to continue my studies at university. I decided to enlist in the YPJ after extremist groups attacked Kurdish areas.

“I am here to prove to the male-dominated society that women are not weak; they can protect their honor against the attacks carried out by ISIS, which is hiding behind Islam. Most of the girls who joined the YPJ have the same feeling. They have the will to free women from the restrictions that have governed them for so long.

“I am very happy to be at this training camp with the rest of my female comrades, even though we have been deprived of the leisure of civilian life; our military outfits are who we are. The attacks by ISIS against our areas increased our resilience. All of this created in us a stronger will to fight and give up everything for the sake of the homeland.

Interview with Dijla, a female fighter, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

I am 20 years old. I left my studies and joined the YPJ three years ago. At a certain moment, I realized that I had to offer something for my homeland and have a value among the society members. I call upon all girls to join the YPJ.
The attacks against our Kurdish areas were motivated many women to join the YPJ and pick up arms in order to save women’s dignity and honor.

Interview with Beritan, a female fighter, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

I am 21 years old. I obtained my middle school diploma and joined the YPJ when terrorist organizations attacked Sari Kaniyeh [Ras al-Ain] two years ago. It was my national duty to defend our homeland alongside men, and I am happy with this decision.

Interview with 26-year-old trainer Furat, woman, Kurdish/ interview transcript below

“Here, at the YPJ’s Martyr Sheilan training camp, I supervise the training of female fighters who have recently enlisted. In each training cycle, 20 trainees undergo physical and tactical training for two consecutive months. “The training program starts at 7 am with a physical fitness class, followed by an orientation session that covers fighting ethics, loyalty and love for the homeland and combat comrades, and an introduction to women’s rights.

“After that, fighters are taught how to use all kinds of light weapons – Kalashnikov rifles, machine guns, pistols and sniper rifles. We also simulate battles so that fighters would be accustomed to real fighting. Fighters in this training camp have enlisted voluntarily. They are between 20 and 25 years of age, and are very happy because they are convinced with their choice of a new life, which made them independent.

“After the training, there is lunch followed by a recreation time, during which the fighters practice their hobbies. They sing, dance dabkeh, play games or read. We try, as much as possible, to create an atmosphere of intimacy and love among the fighters so that they would not feel bored or tired, and so they do not feel far from their families.

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Free Syrian Army Fights in Kobane
kobane
By adrian
30 Oct 2014

October 30-31, 2014 Kobane, Syria A number of Free Syrian Army units have arrived in Kobane to assist Kurdish YPG forces in their struggle against IS. The two groups have joined forces directly on the frontlines and now fight side-by-side.

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Sample media
Live shot from Kobani
Sanliurfa, Turkey
By sami lasmar
20 Oct 2014

Sample work of live shot (satellite) in Kobani, Syria.

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Syrian Kurdish Female Fighter Trainin...
Kobani
By hoger
17 Oct 2014

October 17, 2014
Kurdish training camp located between Qamishli and Kobane, Syria

Kurdish women who signed up for a military training camp to defend their towns from ISIS, speak about the reasons why they decided to join the Kurdish Peoples Protection Unit (YPG). Most are motivated by a desire to help repel ISIS attacks on their homes. They speak also about their lives in the camp.

Note that any woman who joins the force is given a new name, different from her original.

Shot list:

Fighters training (both women and men)
Interview with female fighters
Female fighters eating lunch
Female fighters shooting
Kurdish female fighter at checkpoint
Photos of fighters who lost their lives in the conflicts
Female fighters marching

Sound Bites:

(02:38) Naline, a 19-year-old fighter from al-Qamishli: I was a school student, every time I went to school I felt fear, so I quit temporarily to defend my land and country, to protect my friends from the fear that I felt and to help people live in safety and security. I sacrificed my future to help build other's (02:45).

نالين (19 سنة) من قرى ريف القامشلي تقول: "كنت طالبة، وكنت اذهب دائما الى مدرستي والخوف ينتابني لذلك تركت المدرسة مؤقتا كي ادافع عن ارضي ووطني وازيل الخوف عن صديقاتي الاخريات ولكي ينعم الناس جميعا بالامان". وتضيف: "ضحيت بمستقبلي كي أبني مستقبل غيري".

(01:25) Zaline, a 21-year-old fighter: We carried our weapons and went to the front to fight ISIS, our enemy. They fear our weapons and are shocked by our strength. Life here is not ordinary, you do not find the lies, the betrayal and the hypocrisy you find in a normal life. Here you find true friendship. We want everyone to know that a woman is not different to a man when it comes to defending her country. We ask women all over the world not to underestimate themselves and believe that they are able to accomplish anything (02:00).

زالين (21 سنة) المقاتلة تقول: "حملنا السلاح لنقاتل في جبهة واحدة، يدا بيد. العدو المتمثل بتنظيم "داعش" وغيره (من المجموعات) يخشى سلاحنا وقد تفاجأ بقوتنا. الحياة هنا تختلف عن الحياة العادية، فهنا لا يوجد كذب أو نفاق أو خيانة. هنا، تفتدي (كل مقاتلة) الأخريات بروحها، والصداقة موجودة بأسمى صورها ومعانيها. نريد ان يقتنع الجميع بأن المرأة لا تقل عن الرجل في ما يخص الدفاع عن الوطن، كما نطالب نساء العالم جميعا بألا يقللن من شأن أنفسهن، وأن يقتنعن بأن المراة باستطاعتها فعل أي شيء".

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Syrian Refugees in Turkey Colour 17
kobane
By Ulrik Pedersen
26 Sep 2014

View of Syria from Turkey. Syrians are not allowed to take cars, trucks or animals across the border, so they try to stay safe by being close to the border. ISIS are less than 1 km away from the border. Kobane Valley, Syria.

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Syrian Refugees in Turkey Colour 18
mursitpinar
By Ulrik Pedersen
26 Sep 2014

A woman looking after a baby in a refugee tent near the Syrian border. Mursitpinar, Turkey.

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Syrian Refugees in Turkey Colour 12
mursitpinar
By Ulrik Pedersen
25 Sep 2014

Syrians shuffle between Turkey and Kobane. Many of those who fled Kobane make multiple trips back and forth from Turkey during moments of calm in order to collect as many of their belongings as possible. This women is heading back into Syria. No one is sure if the Kurdish YPG forces will be able to hold IS at bay. Mursitpinar, Turkey.

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Mother, Child, and Kalashnikov
Kobane
By Ulrik Pedersen
24 Sep 2014

A Syrian women from Kobane with her child and AK-47 Assault Rifle on the Turkish-Syrian border, near Kobane. Thousands of Syrians from Kobane fled the ISIS assault on their city for the nearby sanctuary of Turkey. Across Iraq and Syria women are taking up arms against ISIS.

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Kobane Refugees in Risky Game of Back...
Suruc, Kobane
By Ulrik Pedersen
23 Sep 2014

September 24-26, 2014
Suruc Turkey; Kobane, Syria

Syrian-Kurdish refugees from the border town of Kobane are continue to shuffle to and from Turkey, returning to Kobane in moments of calm, and fleeing again as IS pushes closer to the center of town. Turkish authorities have at times sealed the border, leading to clashes between refugees and Turkish police.

According to Turkish authorities, the number of refugees seeking shelter in Turkey from the Islamic State group's advance across northeastern Syria has hit 140,000.The head of Turkey's AFAD disaster management agency, Fuat Oktay, said the figure is the result of Syrians escaping the area near the Syrian border town of Kobane, where fighting has raged between IS and Kurdish fighters since September 18.

Clashes broke out between refugees and Turkish forces on September 26, as refugees destroyed the border fence from inside Turkey to help their fellow Syrians escape. Turkish security forces replied with tear gas, paint pellets, and water cannons.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the Islamic State group has taken control of 64 villages in northeastern Syria. It says that the fate of 800 Kurds from these villages is unknown, adding that the Islamic State group executed 11 civilians, including two boys.

Western forces bombed ISIS troops outside Kobane, but without proper weapons, the Kurds might not be able to hold the city much longer.

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Exclusive Video of Aftermath of Alleg...
Kobani, Syria
By TTM Contributor 9
22 Jul 2014

Kobani, Syria

July 22, 2014

This video shows victims of an alleged chemical attack by ISIS on Kurdish fighters

near Kobani, Syria on July 18 and 19, 2014.

Transterra Media cannot confirm the use of chemical weapons.

At the time, the official spokesperson of the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG)

Redur Khalil and the Health Minister of the Kobani Canton Dr. Na’ssan Ahmad said that they believed that chemical or biological agents were used.

In the video, what appear to be burns are visible on the bodies of two males wearing military fatigues at a hospital in Kobani.

Dr. Ahmad said that he and his colleagues inspected the bodies and found signs of burning but no bullet wounds or other similar war injuries.

Interviews:

Interview with the People’s Protection Units (YPG) official spokesperson Redur Khalil (Arabic)

00:56 ISIS’s use of chemical and biological weapons in the city of Kobani – in its war on the city of Kobani – is a very sensitive issue and we don’t want to anticipate events.

01:10 The indices that appeared and the traces on the bodies of martyrs and the wounded definitely show that ISIS used unconventional weapons.

01:30 There is a probability that these were chemical and biological weapons.

01:34 A committee of specialized physicians was formed in the Jazeera Canton [autonomous Kurdish district in northeast Syria] and it conducted necessary procedures and medical tests.

01:43 It was proven that ISIS has used biological weapons in its war on Kobani. However, the type of the weapons has not been determined, due to the limited means of the medical labs in the canton and the siege imposed on the city of Kobani.

02:09 There are unremitting attempts by the assigned medical committee as well as calls for [human] rights groups and aid organisations to head to Kobani to supervise this operation and analyze the substance that was used by ISIS in its war on Kobani.

02:32 The medical committee is now carrying out its duties.

02:39 The traces left by [these] weapons include burns on bodies that were not hit by bullets or bomb shrapnel. They were blue and white burns.

03:01 In some places where ISIS used these weapons, YPG members could smell a very weird odor. The smell was not that of gunpowder or explosives, which shows that the weapons used against Kobani in these locations were unconventional.

Interview with Health Minister of Kobani Canton Dr. Na’ssan Ahmad (Kurdish)

03:48 – 04:29

We have experienced war conditions for a while and we have seen a lot of injured people and martyrs, but [until now] we have not seen bodies that were burnt and not wounded.

The bodies had burns on the hands and legs [and other] exposed parts. We do not know what this substance is, because we do not have the necessary means [to analyze it].

In the future, it could be possible to conduct some tests to determine the kind of the substance that was used.

My colleagues who assisted me and I, in my capacity as a supervising physician, came to the conclusion that this substance was chemical and internationally banned.

Shot list:

00:00 – 00:39

The bodies of dead YPG fighters show skin burns but not wounds. The bodies were filmed at the Amal Hospital in Kobani.

03:29 – 03:47

Medical staff and an officer in military fatigues stand near the bodies of two dead fighters at the Amal Hospital in Kobani.

04:30 – 05:17

Close shots of a dead fighter’s body show burns on the face, arms.