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Tsunami 13
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
23 Nov 2014

After the 2004 tsunami, around 100 people were evicted from the village by a company that has plans to build a tourist resort in the area. Most of them were relocated a few kilometers away.

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Tsunami 01
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

Baan Nai Rai village is one of many Thai villages hit by the tsunami in 2004. The surrounding mangroves notably reduced the impact of the waves on the area. Now villagers are trying to protect the area from turning into a tourist resort.

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Tsunami 03
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A local fisherman comes back to shore after a day working at sea in Baan Nai Rai village, one of the Thai villages hit by the tsunami in 2004. The area is a mangrove forest that has been targeted by a company that wants to turn it into a tourist resort.

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Tsunami 04
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

Fish farms set up in the lagoon near Baan Nai Rai are one of the villages principal sources of food and income.

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Tsunami 07
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A dog takes watches over one of the fish farms at Baan Nai Rai village.

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Tsunami 08
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A child waits for fishermen to come back on shore at Baan Nai Rai village.

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Tsunami 10
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A styrofoam box is filled with the day's catch of a group of local fishermen.

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Tsunami 12
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A woman waits with her two children near the shore for the fishermen to return so she can start her working routine cleaning and processing the fish.

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Tsunami 14
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

The Baan Nai Rai cemetery, located just a few meters from the sea shore, is among the most important sites for the people in the village, since their ancestors rest there. The cemetary is among the sites under threat by the tourist project.

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Tsunami 02
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A tsunami hazard sign stands in warning at the entrance of the Muslim village of Baan Nai Rai.

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Tsunami 11
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

Narong Sawangsup, 48, stands at the door of his new house with his 9 year-old daughter. The house was built by the company that evicted him from Baan Nai Rai village eight years ago.

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Tsunami 15
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

Fisherman return late in the evening to Baan Nai Rai after a day's work.

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Tsunami 05
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
21 Nov 2014

A woman pushes her boat to the shore at the end of the day in Baan Nai Rai village, one of the Thai villages hit by the tsunami in 2004.

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Tsunami 06
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
21 Nov 2014

Small fish is processed to produce food for larger fish that are raised in enclosed farms at Baan Nai Rai village.

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The Landless People of Noakhali (3 of...
Noakhali, Bangladesh
By Jeff Mcallister
06 Jun 2013

Lying low amidst the Ganges-Brahmaputra river delta, the silt-soaked plains of Bangladesh are some of the most fertile earth. Yet water, the life-blood that once allowed civilization to flourish within the region, now holds it in a dangerous flux.

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The Landless People of Noakhali (1 of...
Noakhali, Bangladesh
By Jeff Mcallister
06 Jun 2013

Land deeds go to those who can afford to pay. It’s estimated that over 50% of Bangladesh’s cultivatable land belongs to 10% of the people.

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The Landless People of Noakhali (2 of...
Noakhali, Bangladesh
By Jeff Mcallister
06 Jun 2013

The people of Shardagga and the surrounding area band together into men’s and women’s groups which partner with local NGOs to direct strategy, acquire loans from micro-credit organizations, manage joint savings accounts, and stand in solidarity against land-grabbing.

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Protest Against Land Grabbing Nairobi...
Nairobi, Kenya
By Mais Istanbuli
03 Jun 2013

Monday, June 3rd, a group of youths marched to the capital of Kenya, Nairobi, to the city hall in protest against land grabbing by foreigners.
Land grabbing by foreigners is a big issue in Kenya. As a result, many young people are unemployed because the places they normally work at are bought by private developers who erect tall buildings for financial benefits. In the past, the Kenyan government has not been of much help to the youths plight due to corruption. But with the current government, they are hoping things will change for the better.Picture By Nick Klaus

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Protest Against Land Grabbing (9 of 9)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Nick Klaus
03 Jun 2013

Monday june 3rd a group of youths matched at the capital of kenya Nairobi to the city hall in protest against land grabbing by foreigners.
Land grabbing by foreigners is a big issue in Kenya as a result many young people are losing employment because the places they normally work at are bought by private developers who erect tall buildings for financial benefits.The Kenya government in the past has not been of much help to the youths plight due to corruption but with the current Government they are hoping things will change for the better.Picture By Nick Klaus

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Protest Against Land Grabbing (8 of 9)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Nick Klaus
03 Jun 2013

Monday june 3rd a group of youths matched at the capital of kenya Nairobi to the city hall in protest against land grabbing by foreigners.
Land grabbing by foreigners is a big issue in Kenya as a result many young people are losing employment because the places they normally work at are bought by private developers who erect tall buildings for financial benefits.The Kenya government in the past has not been of much help to the youths plight due to corruption but with the current Government they are hoping things will change for the better.Picture By Nick Klaus

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Protest Against Land Grabbing (7 of 9)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Nick Klaus
03 Jun 2013

Monday june 3rd a group of youths protest outside the city hall at the capital of kenya Nairobi in protest against land grabbing by foreigners.
Land grabbing by foreigners is a big issue in Kenya as a result many young people are losing employment because the places they normally work at are bought by private developers who erect tall buildings for financial benefits.The Kenya government in the past has not been of much help to the youths plight due to corruption but with the current Government they are hoping things will change for the better.Picture By Nick Klaus

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Protest Against Land Grabbing (6 of 9)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Nick Klaus
03 Jun 2013

Monday june 3rd a group of youths matched at the capital of kenya Nairobi to the city hall in protest against land grabbing by foreigners.
Land grabbing by foreigners is a big issue in Kenya as a result many young people are losing employment because the places they normally work at are bought by private developers who erect tall buildings for financial benefits.The Kenya government in the past has not been of much help to the youths plight due to corruption but with the current Government they are hoping things will change for the better.Picture By Nick Klaus

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Protest Against Land Grabbing (5 of 9)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Nick Klaus
03 Jun 2013

Monday june 3rd City hall gurds looks as a group of youths matched at the capital of kenya Nairobi to the city hall in protest against land grabbing by foreigners.
Land grabbing by foreigners is a big issue in Kenya as a result many young people are losing employment because the places they normally work at are bought by private developers who erect tall buildings for financial benefits.The Kenya government in the past has not been of much help to the youths plight due to corruption but with the current Government they are hoping things will change for the better.Picture By Nick Klaus

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Protest Against Land Grabbing (4 of 9)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Nick Klaus
03 Jun 2013

Monday june 3rd a group of youths matched at the capital of kenya Nairobi to the city hall in protest against land grabbing by foreigners.
Land grabbing by foreigners is a big issue in Kenya as a result many young people are losing employment because the places they normally work at are bought by private developers who erect tall buildings for financial benefits.The Kenya government in the past has not been of much help to the youths plight due to corruption but with the current Government they are hoping things will change for the better.Picture By Nick Klaus

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Protest Against Land Grabbing (3 of 9)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Nick Klaus
03 Jun 2013

Monday june 3rd a group of youths matched at the capital of kenya Nairobi to the city hall in protest against land grabbing by foreigners.
Land grabbing by foreigners is a big issue in Kenya as a result many young people are losing employment because the places they normally work at are bought by private developers who erect tall buildings for financial benefits.The Kenya government in the past has not been of much help to the youths plight due to corruption but with the current Government they are hoping things will change for the better.Picture By Nick Klaus

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Protest Against Land Grabbing (2 of 9)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Nick Klaus
03 Jun 2013

Monday june 3rd a group of youths matched at the capital of kenya Nairobi to the city hall in protest against land grabbing by foreigners.
Land grabbing by foreigners is a big issue in Kenya as a result many young people are losing employment because the places they normally work at are bought by private developers who erect tall buildings for financial benefits.The Kenya government in the past has not been of much help to the youths plight due to corruption but with the current Government they are hoping things will change for the better.Picture By Nick Klaus

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Protest Against Land Grabbing (1 of 9)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Nick Klaus
03 Jun 2013

Monday june 3rd a group of youths matched at the capital of kenya Nairobi to the city hall in protest against land grabbing by foreigners.
Land grabbing by foreigners is a big issue in Kenya as a result many young people are losing employment because the places they normally work at are bought by private developers who erect tall buildings for financial benefits.The Kenya government in the past has not been of much help to the youths plight due to corruption but with the current Government they are hoping things will change for the better.

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Fracking Up Fares
Fares, Aswan
By zeer news
01 May 2013

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

In 2009, the company DANA GAS (UAE) started shale gas explorations near Fares, a small agricultural village on the West Bank of the Nile, 75 km North of Aswan.
The company employed a controversial technique known as hydraulic fracturing or "fracking", which uses a mixture of pressurized water and chemicals to release natural gas trapped in the shale rock. 
The village was soon flooded with groundwater and in January 2013 orchards, crops and houses were destroyed. 
Residents do not have results from the water tests that the government was supposed to carry out.  In addition to ecological concerns, property owners whose land was affected have received very little compensation from the gas extraction company (Dana Gas) or from the Egyptian government. The clean up efforts promised by the government have come to a halt and it is not known if and when they will resume. 

The case of Fares, however, differs from other documented cases of damages caused by fracking. 

The flooding is believed to be the result of seismic testings, a straightforward operation conducted prior to the extraction to determine the size of the shale. 

Therefore, this case shows:

  • how monitoring of the fracking operations --known to be possibly harmful for water reserves -- was poor or non-existent in an area close to the Nile

  • media usually focuses on fracking's direct effects. In Fares, however, damage was caused by a subsidiary effect of fracking

  •  land grabbing - although not through acquisition, but through destruction - occurred without compensation for the villagers and the denial of any responsibility on part of the company

  • the Egyptian government - under Mubarak, the SCAF, and the Muslim Brotherhood - failed to stand up against the company and protect its citizens

  • environmental concerns not only for the village's proximity to the Nile, but also for the destruction of many mature and rare trees

SHOT DESCRIPTION

00:00 - 00:17
Images of Upper Egypt, Map of Fares

VO: "75 km north of Aswan lies Fares, a village of 30,000 inhabitants, on the west bank of the Nile. Renowned as one of the principle producers of mangoes and dates in Egypt, the majority of Fares' residents are employed in the agricultural sector, making fields and crops the crux of the village's economy."

00:18 - 00:35 Images of the flooded fields, Sheikh Ahmed Abdel Hamid

VO: "However, in January 2013, flooding of groundwater devastated fields and orchards, and destroyed houses and local buildings in the village. The flooding has been attributed to the hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, operations by the company Dana Gas, whose extraction site, is only 10 km north of Fares.

00:36 - 00:47 Animated info-graphic on fracking

VO: "Fracking is a controversial technique used to extract natural gas from shale rock. This is done by creating fissures in the shale with a perforating gun, and then injecting a pressurized mixture of water and chemicals to release the trapped gas and bring it to the surface."

00:48 - 01:19 Interview with the Sheikh Ahmed Abdel Hamid (community leader), images of the fields

"It has started since 2009-- first they found that the soil became wet. Gradually, the water began to come on the surface, higher and higher, until it reached the level of one metre. This water has submerged about 2,000 feddans of land (840 hectares)."

01:20 - 01:26 Images of fields, uprooted palm tree

VO: Although the company is not fracking in Fares directly, the flooding is believed to be a result of Dana Gas's seismic testing using 'shot-holes'.

01:26 - 01:52 Animated info-graphic on seismic testing

VO: "Seismic testing uses 30 foot pipes that are inserted into the ground, and an explosion is detonated. The vibrations from the explosion bounce off the subsurface rock and travel back to the surface, where a grid of geophone sensors pick up the wavelengths, thus determining the expanse of the shale below. Ordinarily in the industry, the pipes are plugged in order to prevent flooding. But, these pipes were left open in the fields-- creating a pathway for flowing groundwater to stream upwards."

01:53 - 02:09 Images of fields, springs

VO: "The flooding reached a climax in January, but damage to the fields remains. Stagnant puddles of water exceeding 3 inches, cover entire fields. Groundwater continues to spring spontaneously, creating essentially a swamp out of homes and a formerly prosperous crop."

02:10 - 02:24 Interview with Mohamed Abdouh (farmer and teacher)

"Approximately about 150 families have to move, because of this problem. A lot of these families can't afford to build new houses."

02:25 - 02:36 Interview with Mohamed Abdouh, images of the local graveyard
"The most bitter thing for the villagers is that the graveyard of the village has completely submerged. "

02:37 - 03:06 Interview with Sheikh Ahmed Abdel Hamid in front of a house destroyed

"Approximately 2,000 feddans were flooded by the groundwater. it is more than 2,000 feddans. In these areas there were trees: palms, lemon, mango, berries and that now there is water (that are now flooded). It has more than a hundreds of thousands of doom, palms, mangoes, lemons, and all citrus and this is all the income for the village. These fields are the only income for the village "

03:07 - 03:20 Images of residents

VO: Residents state that there was virtually no consultation with the village prior to shale extraction. In 2009, they were told there may be gas reserves in their village, but the seismic testing carried out directly on their land, was not explained to them.

03:21 - 03:44

"They just came and drilled. When the farmers asked them they told (them) they were looking for oil. So the farmers were happy. If they found gas or oil on your land, you will have a good compensation. Good money as a compensation."

03:45 - 03:52 Images of a street seller, men sitting on the ground, kid riding a donkey

VO: "The governor of Aswan stated that the company would create 450 jobs for local residents, yet no one has been employed to date."

03:53 - 04:06 Images of children, the local school, man picking up bricks

VO: "Moreover, compensation remains a large concern for the residents' livelihood. Beyond the municipal government offering to help rebuild the hospital and school, very little money has actually met the hands of the land and home owners whose properties were damaged."

04:07 - 04:34 Interview with Mohamed Abdouh

"When the villagers went to make a sit-in in the company-- in the site there- -the responsibles came and told us they have given the clerks in the municipal council a big number-- a lot of money. When we returned to the municipal council, they denied that. So we are... we don't know how. We are now bewildered between them…"

04:35 - 04:49 Images of the cleanup operation site.

VO: "The government began cleanup efforts six months ago by draining the fields with pipes that would empty to a drainage canal and then run back into the Nile. The pipes though, were too small, and so the clean up project had come to a halt. When they will resume is unknown."

04:50 - 04:59 Images of Sheikh Ahmed Abdel Hamid, puddle of stagnant water, the Nile river from Fares' shore.

VO: "Residents still have not heard back from the municipal council abt the water test results, but maintain that the water is harmful, which is also a cause for concern due to its proximity to the Nile."

05:00 - 05:16 Images of Sheikh Ahmed Abdel Hamid, images of resident walking next to trees, man on the train.

VO:
In addition to the ecological concerns, it's significant that Fares' principal fields and orchards were destroyed, including many mature trees that had reached peak production. Thus not only costing the agricultural-centered village lost profits this year, but also for the years to come.

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A Four Day Walk
Quezon City, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
27 Apr 2013

On April 24, 2013 to April 27, 2013, around 200 farmers of Hacienta Luisita march for four days and travelled by walking almost 98 kilometers (from Hacienda Luisita, Tarlac to the residency of President Benigno S. Aquino III in Times St. in Quezon City to Malacanang Palace in Manila) to seek the attention of the president’s family to distribute the 4,335 hectares of land to the farmers and release the 1.33 billion pesos to them.

The farmers caravan was dubbed as “Lakbayan para sa Libreng Pamamahagi ng Lupa sa Hacienda Luisita” (A voyage for the free distribution of Hacienda Luisita lands), is led by the Alyansa ng mga Manggagawang Bukid sa Asyenda Luisita (Ambala) and the United Luisita Workers Union (ULWU) to commemorate the one year decision of Supreme Court to distribute Hacienda Luisita.
According to ULWU chairman Lito Bais, “It’s been a year since the Supreme Court decided with finality the distribution of Hacienda Luisita to farm workers, but all we witnessed are pro-landlord maneuvers by the Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) and Aquino’s relatives to strengthen their control over the lands.”

When the farmers almost reach the residency of the president in Times St., police barricade forbid them to enter the premises. Farmworkers had noise barrage, small sharing about their angst and lie on the pedestrian lane to show their utmost protest.

Hacienda Luisita is a sugar cane plantation and formerly owned by Pres. Aquino’s maternal side – the Cojuangcos.

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Blood Sugar 016
By Ruom
29 Mar 2013

January 8, 2013
Omliang, Kampong Speu, Cambodia

Trucks offload the sugar cane onto a belt that takes the cane into a crusher.

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Cham fisher folk fear their future (1...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

Karim and his wife Amrah fish almost every day in the Tonle Sap river. Karim jumps on his small fishing boat after diving into the waters to free his fishing net, which got stuck between the rocks. Karim says, "The only thing we can do is go fishing. I found peace in that, but if we have to leave this place, I don’t know where to go.”

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Cham fisher folk fear their future (1...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

Cham fishermen pray in their mosque, an open space with a green cloth that works as a roof. “When the wind is blowing hard, our mosque sometimes collapses. Then we have to built it up again,” says Treh Roun, one of the three local leaders. Behind the mosque, the Sokha hotel is under construction. The 16-floor hotel will probably be opened in 2014 and is expected to have room for about 800 guests.

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Cham fisher folk fear their future (7...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

The Cham fisher folk are not unhappy, but now their place of stay is threatened by the construction of the Sokha Hotel, a large building that will house more than 450 rooms and is being built next to the pier of the Cham families. The fishing Muslims fear that it will lead to a forced eviction, just like tens of thousands other people in Cambodia who have been forced to move in the past ten years.

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Cambodia: Cham fisher folk fear their...
Phnom Penh
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

Cham Muslims have been living in Cambodia for hundreds of years. Many of them work as fisherman and –woman. But in Phnom Penh, at the peninsula that divides the Mekong River from the Tonlé Sap River, their lives are under threat by the construction of a large hotel. The Sokha Hotel will have more than 450 rooms and is being built next to their pier. The fishing Muslims, who don’t own a house or land, fear that the hotel management will force them to leave. Where-to go, nobody knows.

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Cham fisher folk fear their future (1...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

Routinely, Karim steers his boat over the water. Almost every morning, he goes fishing with his wife Amrah.

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Cham fisher folk fear their future (4...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

Young Cham fisher folk prepare to go fishing at night. They live in a Cham community at the peninsula that divides the Mekong River from the Tonlé Sap River, near the centre of Phnom Penh. Most of them work as fishermen and –women.

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Cham fisher folk fear their future (1...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

In the early morning light, a Cham fishing boat navigates over the Tonle Sap river. The view is taken from the Japanese Friendship Bridge, at the centre of Phnom Penh. “Officially, we are not allowed to fish here because the government says we are too close to the Royal Palace. So they want us to go fishing further up. But we catch less fish over there, so we’re still coming back here," says Karim, a Cham fisherman.

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Cham fisher folk fear their future (3...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

A Cham fishermen prays in their mosque, an open space with a green cloth that works as a roof. “When the wind is blowing hard, our mosque sometimes collapses. Then we have to built it up again”, says Treh Roun, one of the three local leaders. Behind the mosque, the Sokha hotel is under construction. The 16-floor hotel will probably be opened in 2014 and is expected to have room for about 800 guests. The Cham Muslims fear Sokha management will soon grab their land.

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Cham fisher folk fear their future (1...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

Cham fishermen pray in their mosque, an open space with a green cloth that works as a roof. “When the wind is blowing hard, our mosque sometimes collapses. Then we have to built it up again,” says Treh Roun, one of the three local leaders. Behind the mosque, the Sokha hotel is under construction. The 16-floor hotel will probably be opened in 2014 and is expected to have room for about 800 guests.

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Cham fisher folk fear their future (2...
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Kristof Vadino
23 Jan 2013

Cham fishermen pray in their mosque, an open space with a green cloth that also serves as a roof. “When the wind is blowing hard, our mosque sometimes collapses. Then we have to built it up again,” says Treh Roun, one of the three local leaders. Behind the mosque, the Sokha hotel is under construction. The 16-floor hotel will probably be opened in 2014 and is expected to have room for about 800 guests.