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Grossglockner High Alpine Road 1
Grossglockner High Alpine Road
By Anita Kovacevic
06 Jul 2016

The Grossglockner High Alpine Road is Austria's highest situated pass road and is considered the most beautiful panoramic road in Europe. It is under preservation order and should become a UNESCO World Heritage site. It was open in August 1935 and has annually about 900,000 guests from all over the world. It leads into the heart of the Hohe Tauern National Park and to the foot of the highest mountain in Austria, the 3,798m high Grossglockner. The Road is open at the end of April, beginning of May until the end of October, beginning of November and it takes you from SalzburgerLand in the North to Carinthia in the South. The summer visit to the Grossglockner High Alpine Road makes an unforgettable experience and is the ideal destination for families, nature lovers, hikers, bikers and cyclists.

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Twin Lakes National Park
Negros
By Ralf Falbe
30 May 2016

View on Twin Lakes National Park, Southern Negros, Philippines.

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Maternal Healthcare
Hakha
By Andre Malerba
22 Sep 2015

A midwife checks the health of a pregnant woman in a rural village in Chin State, Myanmar.

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Asylum: Majd's Perilous Journey
Beirut
By Transterra Editor
19 Jun 2015

When we talk about the problems that face the world, we often discuss them in magnitude and numbers. We speak of millions displaced, hundreds of thousands dead, and many wounded.

However, what is often lost below the melee of statistics and news headlines are the stories of the individuals who endure these tragedies. Their personal experiences are what humanize all of the numbers and talking heads.

22-year-old Majd Bayoush was driven out of his hometown of Kafranbel, Syria by war. Desperate to start a new life abroad, he was smuggled to Europe via a long and dangerous underground railway.

He first travelled overland to Turkey, and then took a dangerously overloaded inflatable boat from Turkey to the Greek island of Samos. Once in Greece, he was registered with the Greek authorities and held in a migrant detention center.

After his release from the migrant detention center he began a perilous and exhausting overland journey from Greece to Germany. He trudged on foot over mountains and through forests in the bitter European cold.

Despite his tribulations, Majd was one of the lucky ones. He reached his destination of Hamburg…alive.

Majd’s story is just one of millions of stories about migrants risking their lives over sea and land to have a chance at a better life.

June 20th marks World Refugee Day. The commemoration is an opportunity to pause and consider that, with 50 million displaced people worldwide, today's refugee crisis is the biggest since World War 2.

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Global Refugee Crisis: The Worst Sinc...
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
11 Jun 2015

June 20 is World Refugee Day.

In 2014, global refugee numbers were higher than they have ever been since World War II. In 2015, the problem has only gotten worse.

There are currently over 50 million refugees in the world and more than %50 of them are children. Approximately half of the world's refugees are from just three countries: Afghanistan, Syria, and Somalia.

The response to this massive international crisis has been limited, with most refugee aid programs desperately underfunded. Amnesty International has called the lack of robust international response "A Conspiracy of Neglect." With little help on the way, the future of the world's displaced remains uncertain.

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Displaced Yezidi Still Stuck on Mt Si...
Sinjar, Iraq
By Balint Szlanko
26 May 2015

Nearly a year after they were forced to flee to Mount Sinjar following an attack by Islamic State militants on their villages, thousands of Yezidi refugees still remain on the mountain, despite a lack of water, food, and housing.

Almost all food and water has to be hauled up from the plains and the displaced are reduced to eating bred and some vegetables, though some families managed to rescue and bring their animals with them, providing them with milk and occasionally meat.

Some say they are unwilling to go to the official IDP camps in the north as they have relatives fighting with Kurdish forces against IS and don't want to abandon them. Others say they simply don't want to live in the camps and prefer it on the mountain, close to their ancestral land, despite the difficulties they face here.

Many still have relatives missing, too, as IS took thousands of women and children as hostage, many of whom are understood to be kept in sexual slavery.

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Peshmerga Forces Battle ISIS in Sinjar
Sinjar, Iraq
By Balint Szlanko
25 May 2015

Kurdish peshmerga forces have been battling Islamic State militants outside the city of Sinjar since January.

The peshmerga are holding the heights to the north of the city, while IS controls the city itself. There is no sign of any civilians left in the city.

The warfare is largely static: both sides are stuck in their positions, sniping at each other, while IS occasionally tries to storm some of the Kurdish frontal positions, or lob mortars across their lines into the rear.

Low on heavy weapons themselves, the peshmerga typically call in coalition airstrikes when they spot IS forces moving around. On 25 and 26 May, when this report was filmed, the Kurds called in nearly a dozen airstrikes.

According to a report posted on the website of US Central Command said that on 26 May “near Sinjar, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit, destroying two ISIL buildings and two ISIL heavy machine guns.”

The city of Sinjar is important because sits on a road between Mosul, Iraq, and Raqqa, Syria, the two biggest cities controlled by IS. The militants use the road to move personnel and equipment between the two major theatres of war.

The 12th peshmerga brigade, which has been on the lines since the beginning of May, lost 13 killed and nearly a hundred wounded in their first three weeks of deployment.

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Controversial Dam Project Threatens P...
Nahr Ibrahim
By Suzanne Baaklini
08 Feb 2015

Nahr Ibrahim, Lebanon
Febraury 9, 2015

The construction of a dam in the area of Janna, Lebanon, is causing wide controversy among local residents, ecologists and even certain politicians.
Janna, whose name means ‘paradise’ in Arabic, is a picturesque valley near Ibrahim River in north Lebanon, which hosts a rare ecosystem according to ecologists. Concerned Lebanese fear that this project will ruin the natural site without succeeding in retaining water. Geologist Samir Zaatiti warns that the surface on which the dam is being built covers large pits that absorb water.
There are also fears that the project might threaten the water source that feeds the Jeita Grotto, a submerged cave known as a tourist destination.
Preparations for the construction have started and many trees in the areas have been cleared.
Despite its rich water resources, Lebanon has struggled with a water distribution crisis due to the lack of adequate infrastructure.

The full version of the story is available here: https://www.transterramedia.com/media/56852

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Dr. Samir Zaatiti, Hydrologist:
0:17- 0:33
“My professor Michel Bakrovich, the president of the French Hydrologists Association, AHF, believes that this dam will be a like a sieve. He said that it will be dangerous. There is a high risk that earthquakes could occur under the dam.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Jean Abi Akar, Local Resident
00:42 – 00:57
“We have lived in this area since 1820. Our grandparents and fathers’ bones are here, as well as their sweat and blood. Nobody was able to preserve this land. The monks were not able to preserve this land and did not allow us to preserve it either. We were gradually displaced.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Raja Noujaim, Archaeologist and member of the Association to Protect Lebanon’s Heritage
00:58 – 01:33
“The study we have conducted is very clear; this dam will not retain water because the surface at its bottom does not allow it. There are wells that can cover the need for water in the entire Byblos area. However, they [the government] are not interested in doing small projects like these. They want to do big projects to boast about them. Of course, corruption is involved. “More than 300,000 trees and shrubs in this area will be cut down. I dare any expert to come and say that this operation does not have a negative influence. I dare any expert to say that this dam is being built to serve agriculture.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Joelle Barakat, Activist at the Association for the Protection of Jabal Moussa

01:48 – 02:12
“Many inhabitants of the area are farmers, so this river is vital for them. The local inhabitants are the only people who will suffer because of this project. Their natural environment will be ruined; they will no longer benefit from the valley as a touristic site. All of this is being done so that water which is not clean can reach Beirut; water that needs to be purified.”

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Queen of Controversy: Miss Lebanon 2014
Koura
By Pamela Nabhan
28 Dec 2014

Photo gallery of Sally Greige, Miss Lebanon 2014, who was at the center of an international controversy after allegedly being 'photo-bombed' by Miss Israel at the Miss Universe beuaty pageant in Miami. Lebanon and Israel are technically in a state of war and Lebanese citizens are banned from having contact with Israelis. 

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Skiing Afghanistan
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
23 Jun 2014

The Bamiyan Valley is one of the most beautiful places Afghanistan has to offer but it is best known for the destruction of the ancient Buddha statues by the Taliban in 2001. Before skiing arrived to Bamiyan, winter was a desolate time of unemployment. Now, skiing has attracted visitors and is one sign of repose.

For most Afghans, skiing is a very alien concept and there is a severe lack of gear and equipment for all new ski enthusiasts. Many villagers make their own poles and skis out of wood with metal sheeting shaped and nailed to the skis. The Bamiyan ski club and the Aga Khan Foundation are determined to attract more people and spectators to the sport and enable more and more locals to enroll in this new unlikely activity. To promote skiing and tourism in the region, the Bamiyan Ski Club organizes the Afghan Ski Challenge every year in March. The event gathers skiing enthusiasts from Afghanistan and Switzerland.

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North Korea in Color 003
By Ulrik Pedersen
13 Jun 2014

The landscape in Northern North Korea is varied, green and mountainous.

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North Korea in Black and White 001
By Ulrik Pedersen
11 Jun 2014

many soldiers are visiting mount Pakteu due to it's history and importance for Koreans. North Korea.

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North Korea in Black and White 002
By Ulrik Pedersen
11 Jun 2014

Mount Pakteu, in the state's official history as the birthplace of Kim Jong-il, is located at the border between China and North Korea. North Korea.

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Himalayas
Himalayas
By Berta Tilmantaite
09 Apr 2014

Tents in the Everest Base Camp (5364m), where climbers stay for a few days to acclimatise before going up. Acclimatisation is important to reduce the risks and severity of altitude sickness.

Only climbers aiming to summit Mount Everest are allowed to camp in the EBC. However, thousands of people hike to the camp each year to a look how climbers prepare for the challenge.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 011
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
20 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Ski equipment in a guest house in Bamiyan, where the Afghan Ski Challenge takes place every year.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 009
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, with homemade skis made out of wood. "Our village, Jawzeri, consists of approximately 65 houses. Around 30 people from here are trying to learn how to ski, but only 10 really know how to do it well. We don't have any proper equipment and nobody is here to teach us, so we simply ski on the slopes around our village with our homemade skis made out of wood."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 010
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, with homemade skis made out of wood. "The first time we saw skis in our lives was in 2011 when foreigners from the US and Switzerland came to Bamiyan to ski here. We saw their equipment and wanted to try it as well."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 008
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, with homemade skis made out of wood. "Our village has never received proper ski equipment, but we wanted to learn it and had to be creative. So one boy in the village had the idea to make wooden skis with plastic underneath. We cut all the wood ourselves and shape it, it takes two days to finish one pair of skis."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 007
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, "Most villagers in Jawzeri think that skiing is a very good sport and exercise. We are really keen to learn and keep practicing, and our biggest dream is to have proper equipment one day and represent the village - or even Afghanistan - in different ski competitions."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 004
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, "Here in Jawzeri you can find a lot of enthusiasm and motivation for skiing, despite that fact that we don't get any support for this new sport. In Bamiyan village, for example, there is a group of young Afghans who participate in the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place every year. They have proper skis, equipment and support from some foreigners - hopefully we will be able to participate one day, too."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 006
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Villagers stand and watch the skiing. Sultan Ali, 18, "Here in Jawzeri, in our village, we only have one real pair of skis and boots which we got from foreigners some months ago. But that's all we have, we have no ski boots, no skins for the skis to be able to walk up the mountains and no poles. At least the skis we can make out of wood and plastic."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 005
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, "Some older people in our village, let's call them the traditional ones, are a bit skeptical about skiing. We don't have any doctors here and if we fall and get injured we would have a serious problem. At the beginning, most of them didn't like the idea of skiing at all, but now they start to open up and pray with us to get proper equipment."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 002
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, tries on his homemade wooden skis. "We are the first ones who started making wooden skis. Nowadays we have around 10 wooden skis in our village. The second village is called Chap Dara and they also produce their own skis made out of wood...but here at Jawzeri we were the first".

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Skiing in Afghanistan 003
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali, 18, "Some months ago, there was a young man from New Zealand who came to the village with proper ski equipment and taught some people here how to ski. He used to come 2-3 times a week, he worked temporarily in Bamiyan. But now he has returned to New Zealand and nobody really comes to Jawzeri as we are quite off the beaten track."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 001
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
19 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sultan Ali tries on his homemade wooden skis. "Our wooden skis are not professional at all but they do the job. The bad thing is that we don't have skins to put underneath so that we can walk up the hills easily. We don't have ski-lifts in Afghanistan, so at least we would need some ski skins like the boys have in the Bamiyan village." Sultan Ali (18 years, Jawzeri, Afghanistan)

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Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans gets ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge which takes place once a year.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 028
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Spectators from the village watch the group of young Afghans skiing in Bamiyan province, Afghanistan.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 022
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Member of the Afghanistan ski team Sajjad Husaini, 22, says, "Skiing in Afghanistan was introduced by American and Swiss foreigners about 5 years ago. All the equipment we have here in Bamiyan was brought by foreign skiers, and now we have almost 20 skis and proper equipment as poles, boots and skins which is fantastic for us."

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Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 012
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Member of the Afghanistan ski team Sajjad Husaini, 22, "Here in Bamiyan you can ski from January to March and every winter foreigners come and teach us how to ski properly. Four of us locals are now even working as ski guides for other Afghans interested in learning how to ski. There is no test you have to pass here in Bamiyan, you become a guide by experience."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 027
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sajjad Husaini, 22, member of the Afghan ski team, "We, the serious skiers from Bamiyan, want to become professional skiers and guides and represent Afghanistan in international competitions one day. We have been participating at the annually Afghan Ski Challenge here in Bamiyan and I even won the boys challenge last year. Unfortunately, there is no ski federation, infrastructure or real support yet in Afghanistan."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 026
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Sajjad Husaini, 22, member of the Afghan ski team, "We, the ski guys from Bamiyan, have been skiing for around 3 years now and teach more and more to locals who want to get into skiing. Many of our foreign friends from Switzerland, the US, New Zealand and Italy support us, and the Afghan Ski Challenge is getting more and more popular every year. We have hope that the Afghan ski business will get big and flourishing in the future."

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Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year. Member of the team Rahimullah Attayeezada, 20, said "From January to March we go skiing regularly here in Bamiyan, we have to train for the Afghan Ski Challenge. This year was the 4th ski challenge and there are also participants from other countries. But usually the locals win as we are faster running up the hill."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 021
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. Rahimullah, 20, "I am very happy to have the possibility to ski here in Bamiyan, and I am aware that most of the people here don't have access to this sport and lack proper equipment. Now even the girls participate at the Afghan Ski Challenge, we have a boys and a girls competition. Believe me, that is big step forward for my country."

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Skiing in Afghanistan 024
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 020
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year.

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Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Young Afghans getting ready for their ski trip. They train on a regular basis for the Afghan Ski Challenge taking place once a year.

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Skiing in Afghanistan 018
Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan A young villager watches the group of Afghans skiing.

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Bamiyan
By Christina Feldt
17 Feb 2014

Bamiyan, Afghanistan Spectators watch the group of young Afghans skiing in Bamiyan province, Afghanistan.