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Brazilian Families Affected by Zika i...
Recife
By Flavio Forner
26 Jan 2016

Photos of Brazilian families affected by the outbreak of the Zika virus in the city of Recife, in northeast Brazil, as mothers seek help for their babies born with microcephaly.

The Brazilian army is deployed on the streets of Recife in a door-to-door campaign in search of vestiges of Aedes mosquito larvae, responsible for spreading the Zika virus. The population receives instructions on how best to protect and prevent the emergence of mosquitoes in their homes.

The Zika virus, first detected about 40 years ago in Uganda, has long been seen as a less-painful cousin to Dengue and Chikunguya, which are spread by the same Aedes mosquito. Brazilian health authorities are convinced that microcephaly is related to the Zika virus when a pregnant woman is bitten by this insect. This rare condition known as microcephaly often results in mental retardation.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
20 Jan 2016

Mother holds her baby, born with microcephaly, waiting medical attention at Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
20 Jan 2016

Pregnant woman waits for consultation at a clinic in Recife, Brazil.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
19 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator, takes her 4 month-old daughter Alice to a medical consultation by Dr. Vanessa Van Der Linden. Alice was born with microcephaly.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
19 Jan 2016

Dr. Vanessa Van Der Linden measures Alice's skull. The 4 month-old baby was born with microcephaly. Alice's mother is Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator.

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zika in brazil 07
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Recife's Health Department workers and soldiers from the Brazilian military work together in detecting mosquito outbreaks.The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A Brazilian army soldier checking a house in Recife for Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the Aedes Aegypti. The city now gets the help of the Brazilian military in detecting mosquito outbreaks.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A Brazilian army soldier and Recife's Health Department worker talk to local resident to check for Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes. The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the Aedes aegypti. The city now gets the help of the Brazilian military in detecting mosquito outbreaks.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A biologist works in a laboratory at Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil, where she studies the evolution of the mosquito since Africa. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

The mosquito Aedes aegypti spreads four different types of Dengue and Chikungunya, and now the Zika virus.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil, where she studies the evolution of the mosquito since Africa. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Because of the mild symptoms of Zika virus, few people visit a doctor so the government does not know how many Brazilians are already infected. Pernambuco state is the leader with 33 percent probability of microcephaly. The regional government declared a state of emergency in last September.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

The mosquito Aedes aegypti spreads four different types of Dengue and Chikungunya, and now the Zika virus.

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zika in brazil 01
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Dr. Angela Rocha, 67, infectologist at the Oswaldo Cruz hospital in Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil).

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Mothers awaiting care in the waiting room at Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator with her 4 month-old daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Erika Roque with her son Eric, born with microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, where he receives physical therapy.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Dr. Angela, infectious disease specialist at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, shows an image of the skull of a child with microcephaly.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Rafael, an official from Recife's Health Department at a meeting on actions to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, insect that spreads the Zika virus.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, luggage worker at Recife airport, holds his daughter Alice, one of many Brazilian babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Jonathan Gomes Bezerra, a 14 year-old student, holds his sister Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator baths her daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, worker at Recife airport, and Nadja Gomes bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator, with their daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, luggage worker at Recife airport, holds his crying daughter Alice. She is one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

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Giant Rats Prepare to Demine Cambodia...
Sim Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Apr 2015

Cambodia is still one of the most landmine-affected countries in the world. Over 64,000 landmine and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) casualties have been recorded in Cambodia since 1979. With over 25,000 amputees Cambodia has the highest ratio of mine amputees per capita in the world.

A recent Baseline Survey of 124 districts revealed that 1,914,818 m2 of land surface is contaminated by landmines and ERW. In addition, at least 26 million explosive submunitions were dropped on Cambodia during the Vietnam War, mostly in Eastern and North-Eastern areas bordering the Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Vietnam. The bombing is estimated to have left between 1.9 million and 5.8 million cluster munitions remnants.

Belgian NGO Apopo, who have been training African giant poached rats in Tanzania, Angolo and Mozambique to detect explosives and tuberculosis, they recently invited me to document their training process as 3 mine detection rat (MDR) handlers drafted from Africa, taught a CMAC demining platoon how to locate landmines and UXO using African giant poached rats. After 6 months training the platoon will be fully operational and demining with the MDR's on one of the most densely mined swathes of land on earth. Cambodia is still one of the most landmine-affected countries in the world. Over 64,000 landmine and other Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) casualties have been recorded in Cambodia since 1979. With over 25,000 amputees Cambodia has the highest ratio of mine amputees per capita in the world. A recent Baseline Survey of 124 districts revealed that 1,914,818 m2 of land surface is contaminated by landmines and ERW. In addition, at least 26 million explosive submunitions were dropped on Cambodia during the Vietnam War, mostly in Eastern and North-Eastern areas bordering the Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Vietnam. The bombing is estimated to have left between 1.9 million and 5.8 million cluster munitions remnants.   Belgian NGO Apopo, who have been training African giant poached rats in Tanzania, Angolo and Mozambique to detect explosives and tuberculosis, invited me to document their training process as 3 mine detection rat (MDR) handlers drafted from Africa, taught a CMAC demining platoon how to locate landmines and UXO using African giant poached rats. After 6 months training the platoon will be fully operational and demining with the MDR's on one of the most densely mined swathes of land on earth.

The demining project between CMAC and Apopo will be targeting 6 Northwestern districts close to the infamous “K5 belt”.

The K5 is one of the densest concentrations of mines on the planet and causes a significant proportion of Cambodia’s mine casualties. The K5 runs along the entire 750km length of the Cambodia-Thai border. In partnership with CMAC, land is released (through demining and survey) for casualty reduction, agriculture, resettlement and other infrastructure development (roads, wells, ponds and schools).

The release of land allows poor, rural people access to land which was previously contaminated so that they can now safely grow their rice and other crops to feed their families. In addition Mine Risk Education is delivered in communities aimed at reducing the risk of injury and death from mines and other ERW.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Mine Detecting Rats 09
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
25 Apr 2015

So Malen, 24, has been working clearing land mines and (UXO) unexploded ordnance from Svey Rieng Province, Cambodia for the last five years. CMAC demining unit 4 headquarters, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.

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Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
25 Apr 2015

One MDR can search up to 200 square meters in 20 minutes; this would take a technician with a metal detector 1-4 days depending on levels of scrap metal contamination. CMAC demining unit 4 headquarters, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.

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Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
25 Apr 2015

Marcous is a giant African poached mine detection rat. CMAC demining unit 4 headquarters, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.

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Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
25 Apr 2015

Apopo staff monitor a member of the CMAC demining platoon as he trains with a mine detection rat.(MDR). CMAC demining unit 4 headquarters, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.

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Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
25 Apr 2015

The Cambodia Mine/UXO Victim Information System reported at least 64,314 landmine and unexploded ordnance casualties from 1979 to the end of 2013. Of these, 19,684 people were killed and 44,630 injured. Oddar Meanchey Province, Cambodia.

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Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
25 Apr 2015

A land owner signs paperwork supplied by CMAC allowing him to safely reclaim his estate after they successfully cleared the area of all forms of explosives and remnants of war. Oddar Meanchey Province, Cambodia.

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Mine Detecting Rats 15
Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
25 Apr 2015

A land owner walks on his land for the first time since the K5 plan began on the 19th July 1984. In practice the K5 fence / belt consisted of a roughly 700 kilometre long, 500 metre wide stretch of land along the border with Thailand, where anti tank and antipersonnel mines were planted to a density of about 3,000 mines per kilometre of frontage. Moments before he signed paperwork supplied by CMAC allowing him to safely reclaim his estate after they successfully cleared the area of all forms of explosives and remnants of war. Oddar Meanchey Province, Cambodia.

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Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
25 Apr 2015

A fragmentation pit in the CMAC camp on a remote mine field in northeastern Cambodia. Oddar Meanchey Province, Cambodia.

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Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
25 Apr 2015

Lawrence Kombani forty year old father of three has been training African giant poached rats or MDR's (Mine detection rats) to locate land mines and UXO for the past fifteen years. He has left his family in Tanzania after being transferred on a three month program to Cambodia to teach the CMAC DU4 team handling techniques and prepare them for live munitions. CMAC demining unit 4 headquarters, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.

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Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
25 Apr 2015

Apopo team manager Lordes discusses the problem of anti tank and anti personnel mines that still kill and maim Cambodia's people on a monthly basis. Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.

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Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
19 Apr 2015

Lawrence Kombani, forty year old father of three has been training African giant poached rats or MDR's (Mine detection rats) to locate land mines and UXO for the past fifteen years. He has left his family in Tanzania and moved to Cambodia to teach the CMAC DU4 team handling techniques and prepare them for live munitions. CMAC demining unit 4 headquarters, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.

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Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
19 Apr 2015

Victoria a African giant poached mine detection rat (MDR), also dubbed a (hero rat) is taken for a walk on her training lead. CMAC demining unit 4 headquarters, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.

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Siem Reap, Cambodia
By George Nickels
19 Apr 2015

Apopo team members discuss the dangers of locating and disarming Chinese made AP72 anti personnel land mines that contribute to the estimated four to six million unexploded UXO and mines that still litter the rural landscape throughout Cambodia. CMAC demining unit 4 headquarters, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.