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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
29 Jan 2013

29 January 2013. La Rinconada: A nurse tests a prostitute working in a brothel in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru, on the HIV-AIDS. Around 1% of about 1,000 prostitutes in town get positive every year.
La Rinconada was a nice, quiet rural village in Peru’s Los Andes range twenty years ago. However, the economic crisis in the country and the discovery of gold changed the town completely during the nineties. Now, it is a crowded place where thousands of the poor from all over South America frequently immigrate looking for opportunity. The precious metal has transformed La Rinconada into a chaotic village of nearly 50,000 inhabitants (four times more than the past) with a serious lack of social services. The increase in the price of gold (25% last year and 600% in ten years) has pushed many more people to move up there.
Nowadays, the landscape in La Rinconada is full of metallic shelters built without official permits. There is no pavement, sewers and running water. It is full of rubbish and defecation everywhere. It is now a place with serious problems of alcoholism, drugs and crime. The police is nearly absent and illegal prostitution is always present. The use of mercury to separate gold from rock has created a high level of pollution that provokes aggressiveness among the population. This, added to the fact that La Rinconada is about 6,000 meters altitude, causes also breath sicknesses (especially among children) and the local clinic covers just 10% of the needs. Despite some apparent efforts of the local administration, the situation is getting worse year by year.
Photo by Albert González Farran.

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Sickness born out of poverty
kampong cchnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

Leprosy, or Hansen’s disease, is the sickness of the developing world - sickness born out of poverty. Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease which attacks the skin, the peripheral nerves, the mucous air passages and the eyes. The transmission of leprosy is similar to that of tuberculosis. To date, science has not been able to produce a vaccine against leprosy.

The physical handicap caused by the disease stigmatises its victims: it renders the sufferers social outcasts, excluded from their familial and social environment.

Today there are more than a million cases of leprosy identified worldwide, excluding the large number of ex-patients needing specialised mid-term medical and surgical treatment or social assistance because of the handicap caused by the disease.

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Sickness born out of poverty (7 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

One of the first signs of leprosy are pale patches on the skin. The fingers start to stiffen up and eventually without the proper medication lose the feeling as the nerves slowly die.

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Sickness born out of poverty (6 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

Me and my family are shunned by our local community, my family now by our food from a market nearly 2 miles away.

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Sickness born out of poverty (5 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

Leprosy, or Hansen’s disease, is the sickness of the developing world - sickness born out of poverty. Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease which attacks the skin, the peripheral nerves, the mucous air passages and the eyes. The transmission of leprosy is similar to that of tuberculosis. To date, science has not been able to produce a vaccine against leprosy.

The physical handicap caused by the disease stigmatises its victims: it renders the sufferers social outcasts, excluded from their familial and social environment.

Today there are more than a million cases of leprosy identified worldwide, excluding the large number of ex-patients needing specialised mid-term medical and surgical treatment or social assistance because of the handicap caused by the disease.

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Sickness born out of poverty (4 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

In only seven years I lost all my fingers. If the antibiotics were available to me when i realised that I had contracted leprosy, things may have been different for me now.

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Sickness born out of poverty (3 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

My son and wife have to help me with everything that I do in daily life , my eyes have now lost there sight, I cant even see to wash my self. My community has shunned me, they are scared that they will catch this terrible disease that is slowly eating me away.

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Sickness born out of poverty (2 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

I have now lost the feeling in my feet and constantly injure myself.

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Sickness born out of poverty (1 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

Life is extremely difficult, my son helps me to dress myself, clean my wounds and now that I have completely lost my sight navigate through my house. CIOML provide me with antibiotics which has helped calm the disease spreading but I feel that it is now too late.

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Embracing of dry toilets technology i...
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
By midakiarie
19 Nov 2012

1.1 billion people around the world defecate in the open, contaminating their environments and water sources besides spreading diseases like diarrhea, which kills 2,000 children less than 5 years old every day.

In Tanzania, only 10 per cent of her people have access to improved sanitation. Over 40 million of citizens in the Eastern Africa country do not have to improved sanitation.

6.5 million people in the country defecate in the open according to Unicef, causing illnesses related to poor hygiene that could have been avoided, and which costs the government millions of money that could otherwise be used for development.

NGOs are introducing dry toilets where modern sanitation facilities that require no water are built in homes and institutions with unreliable or no water supply.

Proponents of this project say the facility is a better option to many people in the world with many countries still facing water shortage problems.

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Hand washing
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
By midakiarie
16 Nov 2012

A boy washes his hands after visiting the toilet. It is recommended that one should wash hands using soap every time after visiting the toilet to avoid diseases related to poor hygiene.

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Tanzanian Homestead Complete With Toilet
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
By midakiarie
24 Oct 2012

This homestead at Mapinga in Bagamoyo, Tanzania is complete with a toilet. Approximately 1 billion people around the world defecate in the open, contaminating their environments and water sources, as well as spreading diseases like diarrhea, which kills 2,000 children less than 5 years old every day. 6.5 million people in the country defecate in the open according to Unicef, causing illnesses related to poor hygiene that could have been avoided, and which costs the government millions that could otherwise be used for development.