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Jennyfer Ayat : Slave in Kireka's sto...
Kampala, Uganda
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
20 Feb 2012

Kireka-Kampala township-Uganda-East Africa-February 26th-2013
Following on the footsteps of great many people before her, Jennyfer Ayat made a daring and courageous decision to escape the controls of sexual enslavement or perhaps even death, from the followers of warlord Joseph Kony by braving the long march of Gulu Walk. It seems ironic when in essence Jennyfer Ayat is escaping one form of brutal slavery for another.
Over the past twenty years the echoes of pain injected by the Kony terror, have caused women like Jennyfer Ayat, of Uganda to make hard and testing choices to either live in constant fear of death for themselves, their children and loved ones, or harvest bravery from the fountain sitting deep within to escape and live in another form of fear. One where the desperation of making an exodus of living in poverty and in slavery has become invisible to corporations, employing workers at the lowest, most discriminatory wages, robbing them of their human rights and the fundamental freedom to choose, let alone their voiceless whisper vindicating their right of a just deserved human dignity.
It is shocking to observe that children born in this state of bondage; continue to live a life journey of captivity and slave labor, long after their parents’ escape from the Kony violations against humanity. A young 36 year old Jennyfer Ayat carrying a hammer on her shoulder, as if this chunk of iron embellished with a long, heavy pole made of rough wood has become Jennyfer’s best play mate and soul companion. The unimaginable strength of Jennyfer Ayat’s body bears resemblance to a rare piece of priceless sculpture: but this is not the romanticism of African life, this is an image evoking a story of human survival and absolute determination; the cruel reality of working for virtually naught, for each jerry-can loaded with crushed stones and carried airborne by the strong in the quarry, is worth a mere 100 Ugandan shillings. Considering there are some 2250 Ugandan shillings to a dollar in conversion, and many hours of hardship labor to a filled jerry-can, how many more veins must bleed dry for every dignified being to continue living under a dollar a day, while corporations rip offensive benefits through such human abuse and exploitation?
Jennyfer Ayat is seen on many occasions with hammer in hand pounding the rock, her frame is small but her strength is heroic. There are no traces of hatred in her expression, but a breed of devotion that is disturbing to the more fortunate audience, exuding an acceptance of life as it is, and as it will always be. But, it is in Jennyfer’s strength of spirit and will to survive that has kept her and her family breathing their harsh journey. Each frame illustrates the Inferno of an ongoing documentary project called “BUKEDDE”, a word in Luganda, the main local language of Uganda, which means “ONE MORE DAY” to identify that “it is morning again”. It captures the core of Jennyfer’s character and high moral fiber, her moments of tenderness with her little adopted baby, Ivonne whose aura radiates a Madonna like semblance. She cradles the child gently inside their humble home, illuminated by soft candle light in the cold African nightfall. The compositions also encapsulate the private moments of prayer with her son, both clutching their only rosary, recorded through the faint light radiating from a set of azure candles. These are intimate moments she shared; giving every one of us the only thing she has left to give, her self existence.
This moving photographic journey introduces us to Jennyfer, a strong African woman; showing glimpses of her daily life, her hopes and dreams, the reverence and aspirations for her precious children. The moments captured, display the altruism of unconditional love, the importance of small details in life, the sharing of work scented with nobility, and the intimate exchange of profound glances in prayer. The daily trivia of Jennyfer’s life in Kireka are but a brief preview into the depths of her soul captured through the eyes and the lenses, amidst a rollercoaster of emotions as witness of such narrative. They speak of hardship, fear and faith and highlight the coldhearted blindness of governments, institutions and corporations.
This is “BUKEDDE”, it is morning again…
The pictures shows that's time to pray in Kreka's church.
FEATURE STORY.

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Jennyfer Ayat : Slave in Kireka's sto...
Kampala, Uganda
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
20 Feb 2012

Kireka-Kampala township-Uganda-East Africa-February 26th-2013
Following on the footsteps of great many people before her, Jennyfer Ayat made a daring and courageous decision to escape the controls of sexual enslavement or perhaps even death, from the followers of warlord Joseph Kony by braving the long march of Gulu Walk. It seems ironic when in essence Jennyfer Ayat is escaping one form of brutal slavery for another.
Over the past twenty years the echoes of pain injected by the Kony terror, have caused women like Jennyfer Ayat, of Uganda to make hard and testing choices to either live in constant fear of death for themselves, their children and loved ones, or harvest bravery from the fountain sitting deep within to escape and live in another form of fear. One where the desperation of making an exodus of living in poverty and in slavery has become invisible to corporations, employing workers at the lowest, most discriminatory wages, robbing them of their human rights and the fundamental freedom to choose, let alone their voiceless whisper vindicating their right of a just deserved human dignity.
It is shocking to observe that children born in this state of bondage; continue to live a life journey of captivity and slave labor, long after their parents’ escape from the Kony violations against humanity. A young 36 year old Jennyfer Ayat carrying a hammer on her shoulder, as if this chunk of iron embellished with a long, heavy pole made of rough wood has become Jennyfer’s best play mate and soul companion. The unimaginable strength of Jennyfer Ayat’s body bears resemblance to a rare piece of priceless sculpture: but this is not the romanticism of African life, this is an image evoking a story of human survival and absolute determination; the cruel reality of working for virtually naught, for each jerry-can loaded with crushed stones and carried airborne by the strong in the quarry, is worth a mere 100 Ugandan shillings. Considering there are some 2250 Ugandan shillings to a dollar in conversion, and many hours of hardship labor to a filled jerry-can, how many more veins must bleed dry for every dignified being to continue living under a dollar a day, while corporations rip offensive benefits through such human abuse and exploitation?
Jennyfer Ayat is seen on many occasions with hammer in hand pounding the rock, her frame is small but her strength is heroic. There are no traces of hatred in her expression, but a breed of devotion that is disturbing to the more fortunate audience, exuding an acceptance of life as it is, and as it will always be. But, it is in Jennyfer’s strength of spirit and will to survive that has kept her and her family breathing their harsh journey. Each frame illustrates the Inferno of an ongoing documentary project called “BUKEDDE”, a word in Luganda, the main local language of Uganda, which means “ONE MORE DAY” to identify that “it is morning again”. It captures the core of Jennyfer’s character and high moral fiber, her moments of tenderness with her little adopted baby, Ivonne whose aura radiates a Madonna like semblance. She cradles the child gently inside their humble home, illuminated by soft candle light in the cold African nightfall. The compositions also encapsulate the private moments of prayer with her son, both clutching their only rosary, recorded through the faint light radiating from a set of azure candles. These are intimate moments she shared; giving every one of us the only thing she has left to give, her self existence.
This moving photographic journey introduces us to Jennyfer, a strong African woman; showing glimpses of her daily life, her hopes and dreams, the reverence and aspirations for her precious children. The moments captured, display the altruism of unconditional love, the importance of small details in life, the sharing of work scented with nobility, and the intimate exchange of profound glances in prayer. The daily trivia of Jennyfer’s life in Kireka are but a brief preview into the depths of her soul captured through the eyes and the lenses, amidst a rollercoaster of emotions as witness of such narrative. They speak of hardship, fear and faith and highlight the coldhearted blindness of governments, institutions and corporations.
This is “BUKEDDE”, it is morning again…
The pictures shows Jennyfer Ayat organizing her day in the hut.
FEATURE STORY.

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Jennyfer Ayat : Slave in Kireka's sto...
Kampala, Uganda
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
20 Feb 2012

Kireka-Kampala township-Uganda-East Africa-February 26th-2013
Following on the footsteps of great many people before her, Jennyfer Ayat made a daring and courageous decision to escape the controls of sexual enslavement or perhaps even death, from the followers of warlord Joseph Kony by braving the long march of Gulu Walk. It seems ironic when in essence Jennyfer Ayat is escaping one form of brutal slavery for another.
Over the past twenty years the echoes of pain injected by the Kony terror, have caused women like Jennyfer Ayat, of Uganda to make hard and testing choices to either live in constant fear of death for themselves, their children and loved ones, or harvest bravery from the fountain sitting deep within to escape and live in another form of fear. One where the desperation of making an exodus of living in poverty and in slavery has become invisible to corporations, employing workers at the lowest, most discriminatory wages, robbing them of their human rights and the fundamental freedom to choose, let alone their voiceless whisper vindicating their right of a just deserved human dignity.
It is shocking to observe that children born in this state of bondage; continue to live a life journey of captivity and slave labor, long after their parents’ escape from the Kony violations against humanity. A young 36 year old Jennyfer Ayat carrying a hammer on her shoulder, as if this chunk of iron embellished with a long, heavy pole made of rough wood has become Jennyfer’s best play mate and soul companion. The unimaginable strength of Jennyfer Ayat’s body bears resemblance to a rare piece of priceless sculpture: but this is not the romanticism of African life, this is an image evoking a story of human survival and absolute determination; the cruel reality of working for virtually naught, for each jerry-can loaded with crushed stones and carried airborne by the strong in the quarry, is worth a mere 100 Ugandan shillings. Considering there are some 2250 Ugandan shillings to a dollar in conversion, and many hours of hardship labor to a filled jerry-can, how many more veins must bleed dry for every dignified being to continue living under a dollar a day, while corporations rip offensive benefits through such human abuse and exploitation?
Jennyfer Ayat is seen on many occasions with hammer in hand pounding the rock, her frame is small but her strength is heroic. There are no traces of hatred in her expression, but a breed of devotion that is disturbing to the more fortunate audience, exuding an acceptance of life as it is, and as it will always be. But, it is in Jennyfer’s strength of spirit and will to survive that has kept her and her family breathing their harsh journey. Each frame illustrates the Inferno of an ongoing documentary project called “BUKEDDE”, a word in Luganda, the main local language of Uganda, which means “ONE MORE DAY” to identify that “it is morning again”. It captures the core of Jennyfer’s character and high moral fiber, her moments of tenderness with her little adopted baby, Ivonne whose aura radiates a Madonna like semblance. She cradles the child gently inside their humble home, illuminated by soft candle light in the cold African nightfall. The compositions also encapsulate the private moments of prayer with her son, both clutching their only rosary, recorded through the faint light radiating from a set of azure candles. These are intimate moments she shared; giving every one of us the only thing she has left to give, her self existence.
This moving photographic journey introduces us to Jennyfer, a strong African woman; showing glimpses of her daily life, her hopes and dreams, the reverence and aspirations for her precious children. The moments captured, display the altruism of unconditional love, the importance of small details in life, the sharing of work scented with nobility, and the intimate exchange of profound glances in prayer. The daily trivia of Jennyfer’s life in Kireka are but a brief preview into the depths of her soul captured through the eyes and the lenses, amidst a rollercoaster of emotions as witness of such narrative. They speak of hardship, fear and faith and highlight the coldhearted blindness of governments, institutions and corporations.
This is “BUKEDDE”, it is morning again…
The pictures shows Magdalene, Jennyfer Ayat's stone quarry friend worker showing that is affected by the Guinea worms and still working for her and family surviving. Magdalene, does not have any government assistance for her Guinea worms disease, and is condemned to be in this situation forever in the future.
FEATURE STORY.

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Jennyfer Ayat : Slave in Kireka's sto...
Kampala, Uganda
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
20 Feb 2012

Kireka-Kampala township-Uganda-East Africa-February 26th-2013
Following on the footsteps of great many people before her, Jennyfer Ayat made a daring and courageous decision to escape the controls of sexual enslavement or perhaps even death, from the followers of warlord Joseph Kony by braving the long march of Gulu Walk. It seems ironic when in essence Jennyfer Ayat is escaping one form of brutal slavery for another.
Over the past twenty years the echoes of pain injected by the Kony terror, have caused women like Jennyfer Ayat, of Uganda to make hard and testing choices to either live in constant fear of death for themselves, their children and loved ones, or harvest bravery from the fountain sitting deep within to escape and live in another form of fear. One where the desperation of making an exodus of living in poverty and in slavery has become invisible to corporations, employing workers at the lowest, most discriminatory wages, robbing them of their human rights and the fundamental freedom to choose, let alone their voiceless whisper vindicating their right of a just deserved human dignity.
It is shocking to observe that children born in this state of bondage; continue to live a life journey of captivity and slave labor, long after their parents’ escape from the Kony violations against humanity. A young 36 year old Jennyfer Ayat carrying a hammer on her shoulder, as if this chunk of iron embellished with a long, heavy pole made of rough wood has become Jennyfer’s best play mate and soul companion. The unimaginable strength of Jennyfer Ayat’s body bears resemblance to a rare piece of priceless sculpture: but this is not the romanticism of African life, this is an image evoking a story of human survival and absolute determination; the cruel reality of working for virtually naught, for each jerry-can loaded with crushed stones and carried airborne by the strong in the quarry, is worth a mere 100 Ugandan shillings. Considering there are some 2250 Ugandan shillings to a dollar in conversion, and many hours of hardship labor to a filled jerry-can, how many more veins must bleed dry for every dignified being to continue living under a dollar a day, while corporations rip offensive benefits through such human abuse and exploitation?
Jennyfer Ayat is seen on many occasions with hammer in hand pounding the rock, her frame is small but her strength is heroic. There are no traces of hatred in her expression, but a breed of devotion that is disturbing to the more fortunate audience, exuding an acceptance of life as it is, and as it will always be. But, it is in Jennyfer’s strength of spirit and will to survive that has kept her and her family breathing their harsh journey. Each frame illustrates the Inferno of an ongoing documentary project called “BUKEDDE”, a word in Luganda, the main local language of Uganda, which means “ONE MORE DAY” to identify that “it is morning again”. It captures the core of Jennyfer’s character and high moral fiber, her moments of tenderness with her little adopted baby, Ivonne whose aura radiates a Madonna like semblance. She cradles the child gently inside their humble home, illuminated by soft candle light in the cold African nightfall. The compositions also encapsulate the private moments of prayer with her son, both clutching their only rosary, recorded through the faint light radiating from a set of azure candles. These are intimate moments she shared; giving every one of us the only thing she has left to give, her self existence.
This moving photographic journey introduces us to Jennyfer, a strong African woman; showing glimpses of her daily life, her hopes and dreams, the reverence and aspirations for her precious children. The moments captured, display the altruism of unconditional love, the importance of small details in life, the sharing of work scented with nobility, and the intimate exchange of profound glances in prayer. The daily trivia of Jennyfer’s life in Kireka are but a brief preview into the depths of her soul captured through the eyes and the lenses, amidst a rollercoaster of emotions as witness of such narrative. They speak of hardship, fear and faith and highlight the coldhearted blindness of governments, institutions and corporations.
This is “BUKEDDE”, it is morning again…
The pictures shows Magdalene, Jennyfer Ayat's stone quarry friend worker showing that is affected by the Guinea worms and still working for her and family surviving. These women, like Magdalene and Jennyfer Ayat, all have two things in common: they make barely enough money to survive and they are all refugees who fled the war in Northern Uganda. After suffering a decade or more of war in Apac district in Northern Uganda, they came to Kampala in search of a safer and happier life. Most have now spent over a decade working at the quarries with no respite. Magdalene works in Kireka stone quarry since eleven years, earning two US dollar a day.

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Jennyfer Ayat : Slave in Kireka's sto...
Kampala, Uganda
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
20 Feb 2012

Kireka-Kampala township-Uganda-East Africa-February 26th-2013
Following on the footsteps of great many people before her, Jennyfer Ayat made a daring and courageous decision to escape the controls of sexual enslavement or perhaps even death, from the followers of warlord Joseph Kony by braving the long march of Gulu Walk. It seems ironic when in essence Jennyfer Ayat is escaping one form of brutal slavery for another.
Over the past twenty years the echoes of pain injected by the Kony terror, have caused women like Jennyfer Ayat, of Uganda to make hard and testing choices to either live in constant fear of death for themselves, their children and loved ones, or harvest bravery from the fountain sitting deep within to escape and live in another form of fear. One where the desperation of making an exodus of living in poverty and in slavery has become invisible to corporations, employing workers at the lowest, most discriminatory wages, robbing them of their human rights and the fundamental freedom to choose, let alone their voiceless whisper vindicating their right of a just deserved human dignity.
It is shocking to observe that children born in this state of bondage; continue to live a life journey of captivity and slave labor, long after their parents’ escape from the Kony violations against humanity. A young 36 year old Jennyfer Ayat carrying a hammer on her shoulder, as if this chunk of iron embellished with a long, heavy pole made of rough wood has become Jennyfer’s best play mate and soul companion. The unimaginable strength of Jennyfer Ayat’s body bears resemblance to a rare piece of priceless sculpture: but this is not the romanticism of African life, this is an image evoking a story of human survival and absolute determination; the cruel reality of working for virtually naught, for each jerry-can loaded with crushed stones and carried airborne by the strong in the quarry, is worth a mere 100 Ugandan shillings. Considering there are some 2250 Ugandan shillings to a dollar in conversion, and many hours of hardship labor to a filled jerry-can, how many more veins must bleed dry for every dignified being to continue living under a dollar a day, while corporations rip offensive benefits through such human abuse and exploitation?
Jennyfer Ayat is seen on many occasions with hammer in hand pounding the rock, her frame is small but her strength is heroic. There are no traces of hatred in her expression, but a breed of devotion that is disturbing to the more fortunate audience, exuding an acceptance of life as it is, and as it will always be. But, it is in Jennyfer’s strength of spirit and will to survive that has kept her and her family breathing their harsh journey. Each frame illustrates the Inferno of an ongoing documentary project called “BUKEDDE”, a word in Luganda, the main local language of Uganda, which means “ONE MORE DAY” to identify that “it is morning again”. It captures the core of Jennyfer’s character and high moral fiber, her moments of tenderness with her little adopted baby, Ivonne whose aura radiates a Madonna like semblance. She cradles the child gently inside their humble home, illuminated by soft candle light in the cold African nightfall. The compositions also encapsulate the private moments of prayer with her son, both clutching their only rosary, recorded through the faint light radiating from a set of azure candles. These are intimate moments she shared; giving every one of us the only thing she has left to give, her self existence.
This moving photographic journey introduces us to Jennyfer, a strong African woman; showing glimpses of her daily life, her hopes and dreams, the reverence and aspirations for her precious children. The moments captured, display the altruism of unconditional love, the importance of small details in life, the sharing of work scented with nobility, and the intimate exchange of profound glances in prayer. The daily trivia of Jennyfer’s life in Kireka are but a brief preview into the depths of her soul captured through the eyes and the lenses, amidst a rollercoaster of emotions as witness of such narrative. They speak of hardship, fear and faith and highlight the coldhearted blindness of governments, institutions and corporations.
This is “BUKEDDE”, it is morning again…
The pictures shows Magdalene, Jennyfer Ayat's stone quarry friend worker showing that is affected by the Guinea worms and still working for her and family surviving. These women, like Magdalene and Jennyfer Ayat, all have two things in common: they make barely enough money to survive and they are all refugees who fled the war in Northern Uganda. After suffering a decade or more of war in Apac district in Northern Uganda, they came to Kampala in search of a safer and happier life. Most have now spent over a decade working at the quarries with no respite.

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Jennyfer Ayat : Slave in Kireka's sto...
Kampala, Uganda
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
20 Feb 2012

Kireka-Kampala township-Uganda-East Africa-February 26th-2013
Following on the footsteps of great many people before her, Jennyfer Ayat made a daring and courageous decision to escape the controls of sexual enslavement or perhaps even death, from the followers of warlord Joseph Kony by braving the long march of Gulu Walk. It seems ironic when in essence Jennyfer Ayat is escaping one form of brutal slavery for another.
Over the past twenty years the echoes of pain injected by the Kony terror, have caused women like Jennyfer Ayat, of Uganda to make hard and testing choices to either live in constant fear of death for themselves, their children and loved ones, or harvest bravery from the fountain sitting deep within to escape and live in another form of fear. One where the desperation of making an exodus of living in poverty and in slavery has become invisible to corporations, employing workers at the lowest, most discriminatory wages, robbing them of their human rights and the fundamental freedom to choose, let alone their voiceless whisper vindicating their right of a just deserved human dignity.
It is shocking to observe that children born in this state of bondage; continue to live a life journey of captivity and slave labor, long after their parents’ escape from the Kony violations against humanity. A young 36 year old Jennyfer Ayat carrying a hammer on her shoulder, as if this chunk of iron embellished with a long, heavy pole made of rough wood has become Jennyfer’s best play mate and soul companion. The unimaginable strength of Jennyfer Ayat’s body bears resemblance to a rare piece of priceless sculpture: but this is not the romanticism of African life, this is an image evoking a story of human survival and absolute determination; the cruel reality of working for virtually naught, for each jerry-can loaded with crushed stones and carried airborne by the strong in the quarry, is worth a mere 100 Ugandan shillings. Considering there are some 2250 Ugandan shillings to a dollar in conversion, and many hours of hardship labor to a filled jerry-can, how many more veins must bleed dry for every dignified being to continue living under a dollar a day, while corporations rip offensive benefits through such human abuse and exploitation?
Jennyfer Ayat is seen on many occasions with hammer in hand pounding the rock, her frame is small but her strength is heroic. There are no traces of hatred in her expression, but a breed of devotion that is disturbing to the more fortunate audience, exuding an acceptance of life as it is, and as it will always be. But, it is in Jennyfer’s strength of spirit and will to survive that has kept her and her family breathing their harsh journey. Each frame illustrates the Inferno of an ongoing documentary project called “BUKEDDE”, a word in Luganda, the main local language of Uganda, which means “ONE MORE DAY” to identify that “it is morning again”. It captures the core of Jennyfer’s character and high moral fiber, her moments of tenderness with her little adopted baby, Ivonne whose aura radiates a Madonna like semblance. She cradles the child gently inside their humble home, illuminated by soft candle light in the cold African nightfall. The compositions also encapsulate the private moments of prayer with her son, both clutching their only rosary, recorded through the faint light radiating from a set of azure candles. These are intimate moments she shared; giving every one of us the only thing she has left to give, her self existence.
This moving photographic journey introduces us to Jennyfer, a strong African woman; showing glimpses of her daily life, her hopes and dreams, the reverence and aspirations for her precious children. The moments captured, display the altruism of unconditional love, the importance of small details in life, the sharing of work scented with nobility, and the intimate exchange of profound glances in prayer. The daily trivia of Jennyfer’s life in Kireka are but a brief preview into the depths of her soul captured through the eyes and the lenses, amidst a rollercoaster of emotions as witness of such narrative. They speak of hardship, fear and faith and highlight the coldhearted blindness of governments, institutions and corporations.
This is “BUKEDDE”, it is morning again…
The pictures shows Erik, the stone quarry "master boss", where Jennyfer Ayat and hundreds of slaves live in an inhuman conditions. Eric earns 20% for each stone jerry-cane, that the Kireka stone quarry slaves hang in their shoulders.

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Jennyfer Ayat : Slave in Kireka's sto...
Kampala, Uganda
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
20 Feb 2012

Kireka-Kampala township-Uganda-East Africa-February 26th-2013
Following on the footsteps of great many people before her, Jennyfer Ayat made a daring and courageous decision to escape the controls of sexual enslavement or perhaps even death, from the followers of warlord Joseph Kony by braving the long march of Gulu Walk. It seems ironic when in essence Jennyfer Ayat is escaping one form of brutal slavery for another.
Over the past twenty years the echoes of pain injected by the Kony terror, have caused women like Jennyfer Ayat, of Uganda to make hard and testing choices to either live in constant fear of death for themselves, their children and loved ones, or harvest bravery from the fountain sitting deep within to escape and live in another form of fear. One where the desperation of making an exodus of living in poverty and in slavery has become invisible to corporations, employing workers at the lowest, most discriminatory wages, robbing them of their human rights and the fundamental freedom to choose, let alone their voiceless whisper vindicating their right of a just deserved human dignity.
It is shocking to observe that children born in this state of bondage; continue to live a life journey of captivity and slave labor, long after their parents’ escape from the Kony violations against humanity. A young 36 year old Jennyfer Ayat carrying a hammer on her shoulder, as if this chunk of iron embellished with a long, heavy pole made of rough wood has become Jennyfer’s best play mate and soul companion. The unimaginable strength of Jennyfer Ayat’s body bears resemblance to a rare piece of priceless sculpture: but this is not the romanticism of African life, this is an image evoking a story of human survival and absolute determination; the cruel reality of working for virtually naught, for each jerry-can loaded with crushed stones and carried airborne by the strong in the quarry, is worth a mere 100 Ugandan shillings. Considering there are some 2250 Ugandan shillings to a dollar in conversion, and many hours of hardship labor to a filled jerry-can, how many more veins must bleed dry for every dignified being to continue living under a dollar a day, while corporations rip offensive benefits through such human abuse and exploitation?
Jennyfer Ayat is seen on many occasions with hammer in hand pounding the rock, her frame is small but her strength is heroic. There are no traces of hatred in her expression, but a breed of devotion that is disturbing to the more fortunate audience, exuding an acceptance of life as it is, and as it will always be. But, it is in Jennyfer’s strength of spirit and will to survive that has kept her and her family breathing their harsh journey. Each frame illustrates the Inferno of an ongoing documentary project called “BUKEDDE”, a word in Luganda, the main local language of Uganda, which means “ONE MORE DAY” to identify that “it is morning again”. It captures the core of Jennyfer’s character and high moral fiber, her moments of tenderness with her little adopted baby, Ivonne whose aura radiates a Madonna like semblance. She cradles the child gently inside their humble home, illuminated by soft candle light in the cold African nightfall. The compositions also encapsulate the private moments of prayer with her son, both clutching their only rosary, recorded through the faint light radiating from a set of azure candles. These are intimate moments she shared; giving every one of us the only thing she has left to give, her self existence.
This moving photographic journey introduces us to Jennyfer, a strong African woman; showing glimpses of her daily life, her hopes and dreams, the reverence and aspirations for her precious children. The moments captured, display the altruism of unconditional love, the importance of small details in life, the sharing of work scented with nobility, and the intimate exchange of profound glances in prayer. The daily trivia of Jennyfer’s life in Kireka are but a brief preview into the depths of her soul captured through the eyes and the lenses, amidst a rollercoaster of emotions as witness of such narrative. They speak of hardship, fear and faith and highlight the coldhearted blindness of governments, institutions and corporations.
This is “BUKEDDE”, it is morning again…
The pictures shows a boy carrying on his shoulder a 10 kg of jerry-cane stone for a miserable 200 hundred uganda shillings paid.

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Jennyfer Ayat : Slave in Kireka's sto...
Kampala, Uganda
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
20 Feb 2012

Kireka-Kampala township-Uganda-East Africa-February 26th-2013
Following on the footsteps of great many people before her, Jennyfer Ayat made a daring and courageous decision to escape the controls of sexual enslavement or perhaps even death, from the followers of warlord Joseph Kony by braving the long march of Gulu Walk. It seems ironic when in essence Jennyfer Ayat is escaping one form of brutal slavery for another.
Over the past twenty years the echoes of pain injected by the Kony terror, have caused women like Jennyfer Ayat, of Uganda to make hard and testing choices to either live in constant fear of death for themselves, their children and loved ones, or harvest bravery from the fountain sitting deep within to escape and live in another form of fear. One where the desperation of making an exodus of living in poverty and in slavery has become invisible to corporations, employing workers at the lowest, most discriminatory wages, robbing them of their human rights and the fundamental freedom to choose, let alone their voiceless whisper vindicating their right of a just deserved human dignity.
It is shocking to observe that children born in this state of bondage; continue to live a life journey of captivity and slave labor, long after their parents’ escape from the Kony violations against humanity. A young 36 year old Jennyfer Ayat carrying a hammer on her shoulder, as if this chunk of iron embellished with a long, heavy pole made of rough wood has become Jennyfer’s best play mate and soul companion. The unimaginable strength of Jennyfer Ayat’s body bears resemblance to a rare piece of priceless sculpture: but this is not the romanticism of African life, this is an image evoking a story of human survival and absolute determination; the cruel reality of working for virtually naught, for each jerry-can loaded with crushed stones and carried airborne by the strong in the quarry, is worth a mere 100 Ugandan shillings. Considering there are some 2250 Ugandan shillings to a dollar in conversion, and many hours of hardship labor to a filled jerry-can, how many more veins must bleed dry for every dignified being to continue living under a dollar a day, while corporations rip offensive benefits through such human abuse and exploitation?
Jennyfer Ayat is seen on many occasions with hammer in hand pounding the rock, her frame is small but her strength is heroic. There are no traces of hatred in her expression, but a breed of devotion that is disturbing to the more fortunate audience, exuding an acceptance of life as it is, and as it will always be. But, it is in Jennyfer’s strength of spirit and will to survive that has kept her and her family breathing their harsh journey. Each frame illustrates the Inferno of an ongoing documentary project called “BUKEDDE”, a word in Luganda, the main local language of Uganda, which means “ONE MORE DAY” to identify that “it is morning again”. It captures the core of Jennyfer’s character and high moral fiber, her moments of tenderness with her little adopted baby, Ivonne whose aura radiates a Madonna like semblance. She cradles the child gently inside their humble home, illuminated by soft candle light in the cold African nightfall. The compositions also encapsulate the private moments of prayer with her son, both clutching their only rosary, recorded through the faint light radiating from a set of azure candles. These are intimate moments she shared; giving every one of us the only thing she has left to give, her self existence.
This moving photographic journey introduces us to Jennyfer, a strong African woman; showing glimpses of her daily life, her hopes and dreams, the reverence and aspirations for her precious children. The moments captured, display the altruism of unconditional love, the importance of small details in life, the sharing of work scented with nobility, and the intimate exchange of profound glances in prayer. The daily trivia of Jennyfer’s life in Kireka are but a brief preview into the depths of her soul captured through the eyes and the lenses, amidst a rollercoaster of emotions as witness of such narrative. They speak of hardship, fear and faith and highlight the coldhearted blindness of governments, institutions and corporations.
This is “BUKEDDE”, it is morning again…
The pictures shows Magdalene, Jennyfer Ayat's stone quarry friend worker showing that is affected by the Guinea worms and still working for her and family surviving. These women like Magdalene and Jennyfer Ayat, all have two things in common: they make barely enough money to survive and they are all refugees who fled the war in Northern Uganda. After suffering a decade or more of war in Apac district in Northern Uganda, they came to Kampala in search of a safer and happier life. Most have now spent over a decade working at the quarries with no respite.

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Health in Uganda (4 o...
Kampala, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2012

Kampala, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows the procedure for the HIV/AIDS testing inside the Mulago hospital clinic lab.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 11
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
20 Jan 2012

The fighting was fierce and ambushes a constant danger. Al Shabaab was capable and resourceful and AMISOM took serious casualties as they slowly pushed Al Shabaab out of the capital. Here an AMISOM ambulance was hit by a recoilless rifle grenade, the grenade going straight through the cabin wounding the already wounded soldiers further during the Mogadishu University Offensive on 20 January 2012.

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The Somali National Army in the Somal...
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
01 Jan 2012

The Somali National Army - A far cry from the Somali Army of the Cold War often referred to as the Lion of Africa - has slowly emerged from the civil war as a somewhat coherent fighting force in the past few years capable of supporting and participating in various AMISOM offensives. When AMISOM deployed in Somalia in the spring of 2007 the Somali National Army was little more than clan militias loosely bound together with the aim of countering the threat of Al Shabaab and protect and preserve the Transitional Federal Government and its institutions. Since Al Shabaab in the autumn of 2010 tried and failed in the attempt to push the Transitional Federal Government and AMISOM into the sea, the Somali National Army has slowly evolved into the present fighting force capable of fighting Al Shabaab on their own terms. The development has been hampered by clan interests, lack of weaponry and training, but international efforts and an acceptance of common goals among the contributing clans have by now established it as a major actor in the rebuilding of the Somali State, but the road has been long and ardous.

The present compilation of pictures depicts the Somali National Army from training via deployment in the capital to actual participating in combat and the possible outcome.  

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The bus to Gulu
Gulu, Uganda
By Amy Hume
21 Dec 2011

End of the Weak General Burney MC in Gulu to organize an event in the North.

Hip Hop is a global phenomena that reaches nearly all corners of the Earth. Starting in the projects of NYC nearly 40 years ago, struggling youth from Mongolia to Rwanda use music as a weapon to express their situations, hopes, and dreams. Though Hip Hop culture is new to Uganda, it is becoming popular with people of all ages, but with the youth in particular. Hip Hop music is reaching the smallest of villages, as I witnessed in the war-torn area of Gulu. Access to music is free, which is an essential aspect of why Hip Hop is spreading like wildfire.
In 2009, End of the Weak (EOW), a collaboration of MCs, graffiti artists, break dancers and DJs that spans 17 countries, reached Uganda. All chapters of EOW are involved with community outreach, workshops for youth and exude positive influence in their communities through Hip Hop culture. The MC Challenge is a competition in each country wherein the winners gather at the World Finals, which are held in a different country each year. The MC Challenge is held in the central, eastern, western and northern regions of Uganda so that many different languages are represented in the competition. Winners of the MC Challenge are provided studio time, video production and photo shoots as a way to share and promote their music.

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God is Great
Gulu, Uganda
By Amy Hume
21 Dec 2011

EOW General Burney MC on the bus to Gulu to organize a Hip Hop event in the North.

Hip Hop is a global phenomena that reaches nearly all corners of the Earth. Starting in the projects of NYC nearly 40 years ago, struggling youth from Mongolia to Rwanda use music as a weapon to express their situations, hopes, and dreams. Though Hip Hop culture is new to Uganda, it is becoming popular with people of all ages, but with the youth in particular. Hip Hop music is reaching the smallest of villages, as I witnessed in the war-torn area of Gulu. Access to music is free, which is an essential aspect of why Hip Hop is spreading like wildfire.
In 2009, End of the Weak (EOW), a collaboration of MCs, graffiti artists, break dancers and DJs that spans 17 countries, reached Uganda. All chapters of EOW are involved with community outreach, workshops for youth and exude positive influence in their communities through Hip Hop culture. The MC Challenge is a competition in each country wherein the winners gather at the World Finals, which are held in a different country each year. The MC Challenge is held in the central, eastern, western and northern regions of Uganda so that many different languages are represented in the competition. Winners of the MC Challenge are provided studio time, video production and photo shoots as a way to share and promote their music.

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DJ Apeman, Africa's Best DJ
Kampala, Uganda
By Amy Hume
17 Dec 2011

DJ Apeman, raised in the UK, returned to his homeland to ignite people through music.

Hip Hop is a global phenomena that reaches nearly all corners of the Earth. Starting in the projects of NYC nearly 40 years ago, struggling youth from Mongolia to Rwanda use music as a weapon to express their situations, hopes, and dreams. Though Hip Hop culture is new to Uganda, it is becoming popular with people of all ages, but with the youth in particular. Hip Hop music is reaching the smallest of villages, as I witnessed in the war-torn area of Gulu. Access to music is free, which is an essential aspect of why Hip Hop is spreading like wildfire.
In 2009, End of the Weak (EOW), a collaboration of MCs, graffiti artists, break dancers and DJs that spans 17 countries, reached Uganda. All chapters of EOW are involved with community outreach, workshops for youth and exude positive influence in their communities through Hip Hop culture. The MC Challenge is a competition in each country wherein the winners gather at the World Finals, which are held in a different country each year. The MC Challenge is held in the central, eastern, western and northern regions of Uganda so that many different languages are represented in the competition. Winners of the MC Challenge are provided studio time, video production and photo shoots as a way to share and promote their music.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 03
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
18 Nov 2011

The Somali Army soldiers were underfed, undertrained, under-equipped and often addicted to khat/mirra. Here a Somali soldier high on khat rests at a battalion HQ on the eastern frontline in Mogadishu on 18 November 2011.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 02
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
17 Nov 2011

Two widows of killed Somali Army soldiers collect the salary of their dead husbands in Mogadishu, on 17 November 2011. The Somali army, under-equipped and undertrained, took part in the fighting, losing thousands of soldiers in the process.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 08
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
04 Nov 2011

The AMISOM soldiers received training both pre-deployment and while in-country. Fighting in the streets of Mogadishu, Urban Warfare, represented a new kind of war for the Ugandan Army that had specialised in bush war rather than Urban combat. Here Ugandan soldiers arriving at the Al Jazeera training camp south of Mogadishu for training on 4 November 2011.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 10
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
02 Nov 2011

The fighting in Mogadishu was done from building to building and block to block and few house were left unscarred. The fighting was fierce and hiding places aplenty in the ruined city. Here a Ugandan soldier is hiding from potential snipers on the top floor of the ruins of the once majestic Aruba Hotel in Mogadishu on 2 November 2011.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 06
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
22 Oct 2011

AMISOM convoys would often be ambushed and vigilant guard had to be maintained when the AMISOM convoys navigated the potholed streets of Mogadishu. Here a Ugandan soldier with the nickname "Stonecold" is guarding the rear of the convoy as it moves through downtown Mogadishu on 22 October 2011.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 07
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
22 Oct 2011

AMISOM convoys would often be ambushed and vigilant guard had to be maintained when the AMISOM convoys navigated the potholed streets of Mogadishu. Here a Ugandan soldier with the nickname "Stonecold" is guarding the rear of the convoy as it moves through downtown Mogadishu on 22 October 2011.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
21 Oct 2011

This collection depicts Ugandan and Burundian soldiers in 2011 and 2012 as part of the African Union forces under a UN mandate African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM).
The battles were a turning point in the war as Al Shabaab was first driven out of Mogadishu and later forced to retreat from Afgoye, a strategic town 30 kilometres north of Mogadishu.
AMISOM was formed initially by Ugandan and Burundian troops in Mogadishu, and later joined by Kenyan, Ethiopian, Djiboutian and Sierra Leonian troops, suffering heavy losses during the brutal fighting in and around Mogadishu.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 13
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
21 Oct 2011

Thousands of AMISOM soldiers were killed and injured in the now eight year long war in Somalia. Here a Burundian officer is depicted with the passports of dead and wounded Burundian soldiers after the battle for Daynile district, where the Burundian contingent suffered 75 killed in an ambush. 21 October 2011.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 13
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
15 Oct 2011

The war was dirty and relentless and atrocities were committed. Here two Ugandan soldiers stand in front of the leftover equipment from AMISOM soldiers executed by the Al Shabaab. 15 October 2011.

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The Somali National Army in the Somal...
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
15 Oct 2011

Somali National Army pick up truck with a 12.7mm Duskha heavy machine gun mounted on the back.

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The Somali National Army in the Somal...
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
15 Oct 2011

Somali National Army soldiers sit the back of pick up truck in the midst of a battle with al-Shabab.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 12
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
15 Oct 2011

Thousands of AMISOM soldiers were killed and injured through the years of fighting Al Shabaab in and around Mogadishu. Here Burundian soldiers wounded in the Daynile Offensive are on their way to be evacuated to Nairobi, Kenya for medical treatment on 15 October 2011.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 04
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
10 Oct 2011

As a lowtech army with limited budget food for the soldiers was made in the old fashion way on bonfires wherever possible. Here Ugandan army kitchen at the National Stadium in Mogadishu on 10 October 2011.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 09
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
10 Oct 2011

The war in Mogadishu was brutal and ver present. Although Al Shabaab fought back the AMISOM troops were able to capture Mogadishu bit by bit not least thanks to the presence of the T55 tanks that provided much needed firepower on operations. Here a Ugandan T55 ready for action during the battle of the Pasta Factory. The offensive aimed at dislodging Al Shabaab from the north eastern part of the city.

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The Somali National Army in the Somal...
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
10 Oct 2011

Somali Army soldiers pile on the back of a pick up truck during the battle for the Pasta Factory in Mogadishu.

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The Somali National Army in the Somal...
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
10 Oct 2011

Somali soldiers and female khat suppliers wait to get paid.

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The Somali National Army in the Somal...
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
10 Oct 2011

Somali soldiers at the Coca Cola Factory in Mogadishu. The soldiers are in the midst of a battle to capture the factory.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 02
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
05 Oct 2011

Ugandan soldiers play checkers with bottle caps in a semi-destroyed building at the eastern part of Mogadishu on 5 October 2011. The Ugandan People's Defense Forces took heavy casualties in the hard fighting as they forced Al Shabaab out of the Somali capital.

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The Somali National Army in the Somal...
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
05 Oct 2011

Somali National Army soldiers with their weapons wait to receive their pay in Mogadishu.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 03
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
05 Oct 2011

The Ugandan People's Defence Forces took heavy casualties in the hard fighting as they forced Al Shabaab out of the Somali capital. Two Ugandan soldiers enjoy a free moment to play checkers with bottle caps in a semi-destroyed building at the eastern part of Mogadishu on 5 October 2011.

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The Somali National Army in the Somal...
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
05 Oct 2011

Somali National Army soldiers and their heavy weaponry on the main street of Mogadishu.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 05
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
28 Sep 2011

Moving around in Mogadishu the Ugandan People's Defence Forces used Casspir armoured personnel carriers carrying PKM machine guns and 12.7 mm. Here Ugandan Casspir Armoured Personnel Carriers navigating the roundabout at Kilometre 4 on their way downtown on 28 September 2011.

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The Somali National Army in the Somal...
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
28 Sep 2011

Decades of fighting in Somalia has left a high number of amputees to end for themselves.

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AMISOM in Mogadishu 02
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
19 Sep 2011

With a UN mandate to protect the Somali Government institutions the AMISOM soldiers provided close protection for Somali politicians in Mogadishu. Here a Ugandan security detail protects the Somali Minister of Defence during his visit in the fall of 2011 to the Somali National Army HQ (Gashandiga) forming part of the frontline in Mogadishu.

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Somalia: Routing Al-Shabab 10
Mogadishu
By Noe Falk Nielsen
29 Jul 2011

An Al Shabaab sniper fires at a Ugandan soldier as he crosses an open area on the frontline during the battle of Bakara Market in Mogadishu on 29 July 2011. Notice the bullet hitting the ground right behind the running soldier.

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Cyno MC and Burney MC
Berlin, Germany
By Amy Hume
28 Jul 2011

The first representatives of End of the Weak Uganda, Cyno and Burney, join the annual World Finals 2011, which hosted Hip Hop artists from 7 countries, in Berlin.

Hip Hop is a global phenomena that reaches nearly all corners of the Earth. Starting in the projects of NYC nearly 40 years ago, struggling youth from Mongolia to Rwanda use music as a weapon to express their situations, hopes, and dreams. Though Hip Hop culture is new to Uganda, it is becoming popular with people of all ages, but with the youth in particular. Hip Hop music is reaching the smallest of villages, as I witnessed in the war-torn area of Gulu. Access to music is free, which is an essential aspect of why Hip Hop is spreading like wildfire.
In 2009, End of the Weak (EOW), a collaboration of MCs, graffiti artists, break dancers and DJs that spans 17 countries, reached Uganda. All chapters of EOW are involved with community outreach, workshops for youth and exude positive influence in their communities through Hip Hop culture. The MC Challenge is a competition in each country wherein the winners gather at the World Finals, which are held in a different country each year. The MC Challenge is held in the central, eastern, western and northern regions of Uganda so that many different languages are represented in the competition. Winners of the MC Challenge are provided studio time, video production and photo shoots as a way to share and promote their music.