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Ecuador resumes normal life after ear...
Pedernales
By Cristina Muñoz
15 May 2016

One month after Pedernales 7.8 earthquake, in Ecuador's coast, almost 30,000 victims try to find normality for their lives.
Though the Ecuadorian government had implemented 19 official shelters, with the aid of ACNHUR, Red Cross and friendly countries, some have decided to stay on improvised camps.
These towns, mostly inhabited by humble fishermen, will take years to rebuilt, while they turn their hopes on God. On May 16th, moved by the Catholic tradition, requiem masses will take place all over the coastal cities to remember the 660 deaths and 40 missing people

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
13 May 2016

Despite the prison is self-managed, security and administrative management of the prison entrusted to the police. In the pyramid of the prison system, at the back of the interior minister and the director of the penitentiary department there is the colonel-in-chief, the only one who actually lives in the building and, in fact, represents the Bolivian government within the walls of San Pedro. Often they are interviewed by journalist and videomaker and, with same frequency, they are replaced by their superiors.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
10 May 2016

Section Pinos, which owes its name to a large tree in the middle of his small yard, holds two restaurants, two bars, a soccer field, a billiard room and a study room, now it used as a copy shop. The lack of accommodation available in the prison, because of overcrowding, led prisoners to set up makeshift shelters practically anywhere: attics, stairs and gaps have thus become housing for one or more people, sometimes entire families.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
10 May 2016

In each section are placed some pay phones equipped with metered and managed by one or more inmates, required to pay the good section of the revenues. The phone, controlled by the police prison, should be the only system of communication with the outside. In truth, most of the prisoners own a mobile phone with which it can continue to manage relationships with the outside and, if they did, their illicit activities, unaware of the police.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
05 May 2016

Visits inside the prison are allowed for most days of the week and like everything inside the prison are by payment.Visitors are allowed to spend the entire day inside and through an additional payment, even to stay overnight.Who does not receive visits can always reach his loved ones through the inevitable phone, only prohibited on paper and for which refills are sold in many commercial activities managed by the prisoners.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
05 May 2016

The monoblock of Palmar, although it is a collective dormitory, it is equipped with a TV and three electric hot-plates. Television, inside the prison, is a faithful mate of life for the majority of the prisoners and it continues to remain on even when no one looks.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
05 May 2016

The roofs of the prison, which are accessed by some cells of the last floor moving a sheet resting on the beams, are used for a variety of activities:drying foods,sunbathing,smoking outdoors and drying clothes . Of this late activity are occupied the mostly of poorest prisoners who, after washing clothes, bedding and mattresses for other companions; they venture on to the rickety sheet metal roofing at about 10 meters above the ground, seriously endangering their lives, to earn only a few pesos.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
04 May 2016

Within a niche carved into the wall and protected by a wooden structure, a television with a powerful sound system it offers a little ‘entertainment to the prisoners, in the yard of Palmar section. Often some viewers are not part of the section but, despite being prohibited, there is a tacit tolerance and shared.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
29 Apr 2016

Marco, a young twenty year old with a long interval between the recovery community and juvenile prison dreams, as a free man, a future in hip hop music. habitual consumer of alcohol and drugs of all kinds, he wrote his lyrics mostly in prison, where he finds every day a lot of ideas, including the conditions of the detainees and their adventures before his arrest. It is more inspired by Latin American artists and Cypress Hill.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
25 Apr 2016

Among the many commercial and craft activities there is a dressmaker’s workroom manage by 3 three prisoners, which shall make garments both for the prisoners themselves than for external institutions and associations. Genaro, the head of the workshop, he learned to be a tailor in prison and dreams, as a free man, to open his own workshop. In his past, for years, he had always dealt with the cocaine refining process in the Bolivian jungle and he had never done work legally paid.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
21 Apr 2016

In addition to the shelters and individual cells, there are also common dormitories, arranged to accommodate a larger number of prisoners, because the rent of a single cell is quite expensive and many can not afford it.To convict it is given a bed, a personal locker and the possibility to use the common warming. So, without any rehabilitative logic, prisoners in preventive detention, young thieves and small-time dealers must live side by side with murderers, rapists and drug traffickers.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
18 Apr 2016

Several times a week entering hundreds of liters of smuggled alcohol in San Pedro. Corruption, which is overflowing among the police, it allows the input and feeds a commercial chain, as well, is created. Mostly it is pure alcohol at 96 °, manufactured by the bolivian company names Caiman and packaged in aluminum cans of 1 liter with a characteristic purple color. After the resale and consumption of their content, the latter are recycled within the prison and thus become pretty toys sold outside.

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Photo Essay: San Pedro Jail: the Pris...
La Paz
By Andrea Carrubba
08 Apr 2016

Penitenziary organization gives the breakfast and the lunch to the prisoners, in the plazas of the sections. Out of this, everything is by payment. Every is coocked by prisoners in the kitchen of Palmar section.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 53
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (left), 46, from Bolivia, attends a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 52
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (center), 46, from Bolivia, attends a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 54
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, and her friend Graciela (left), walk downstairs to the metro station after attending a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 55
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez, 46, from Bolivia, travels by metro after attending a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Cuba's New Entrepreneurs
Santa Clara, Cuba
By Conteur d'images
02 Apr 2015

In Santa Clara, like in many Cuban cities, reforms passed by the Cuban government authorizing private property, most often associated with the liberalization of the economy, gave birth to a new phenomenon: the transformation of family houses into shops and businesses of all kinds. 

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST
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Les nouveaux entrepreneurs de Cuba


À Cuba, les récentes réformes sur l’accès à la propriété, les voyages à l’étranger et la libéralisation du commerce ont donné naissance à un phénomène de société qui prend chaque jour plus d’ampleur dans les villes : la transformation des maisons familiales en boutiques.

ARTICLE COMPLET DISPONIBLE SUR DEMANDE

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Bogota centro
Bogotá
By cdsalas
24 Mar 2015

Vista de Bogotá desde el edificio Colpatria

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Bogotá Norte
Bogotá
By cdsalas
24 Mar 2015

Vías del tren de la sábana que conduce a Zipaquirá, en el norte de Bogotá.

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Bogotá Sur
Bogotá
By cdsalas
24 Mar 2015

Casas de ocupación en el barrio de Soacha al sur de Bogotá, estrato 1.

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Monserrate
Bogotá
By cdsalas
24 Mar 2015

Vistas de la ciudad desde el cerro de Monserrate, uno de los lugares más visitados de Bogotá.

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Living along Nicaragua’s Grand Canal
Rivas, Nicaragua
By Charlotte Bruneau
22 Jan 2015

A Chinese firm started construction on the Nicaragua Canal in late 2014 in the city of Rivas.  It is considered the world’s latest mega project and one of the largest engineering projects in history, expected to take five years to complete and to cost around 50 billion dollars, raising controversy and environmental concerns.

To win the Nicaraguan people’s support for the planned canal, the government of President Daniel Ortega launched an impressive propaganda campaign claiming that the canal would bring wealth and power to the nation. However, to make way for the canal, as many as 30,000 people will have to be displaced and dozens of villages erased from the map. Environmentalists worry about the ecological costs as well.

Kenny has finished his design degree a couple of months ago. During his studies, he built a model of the canal because he did not really know what it would look like: the most widespread criticism of the canal project is the lack of information provided by the government.

“The model’s design comes out of my imagination,"  explains Kenny while proudly opening and closing his model canal’s locks. "I tried to make sense of the scarce official information we receive. I invited the village’s children to participate in building the model to help them better understand the canal.”

While he is trying to find a job, he works in a car repair workshop. The workers there explain that, although they would like the canal to create employment opportunities for them, the Chinese are importing machines they don’t have the skills to handle. The government’s promise of employment is empty, they say.

“We have to learn how to better organize and protect ourselves," says one of Kenny's co-workers. "Some of us are already being followed by the government and I am sometimes scared to sleep at home. The government tries to scare families into keeping quiet while a number of foreign journalists were already expelled.”

The idea of having a trans-oceanic canal cutting through Nicaragua is hardly revolutionary. More than 150 years ago, the American businessman Cornelius Vanderbilt had already started digging but later stopped the project for lack of enough investors. Others, like the New Spain colonial administration or France’s Napoleon III considered, and later on abandoned, the idea of a Nicaraguan canal.

Now it is the Chinese’s turn to take on the Grand Canal’s challenge: 278 km long and at times 520 meters wide, the canal will allow for bulk carriers to navigate from the Pacific coast to the Caribbean. President Ortega, the former Marxist guerrilla revolutionary, granted the Chinese businessman Wang Jing’s HK Nicaragua Canal Development Investment Co. Ltd (HKND Group) a 50-year concession.  HKND says that the canal would create an estimated 50,000 jobs, but thousands of them would go to Chinese workers.

At the same time, the local population fears that Rivas might become a Chinese town when the Chinese workers arrive, bringing prostitution and high prices as Chinese goods flood the local markets. Indeed, the canal’s project is accompanied by a number of other projects. For instance, the HKND Group will be allowed to establish a number of so-called zonas francas, or tax free zones.

Such agreements between HKND and the Ortega government led a number of critics to assume that Wang Jing secretly acts on behalf of the Chinese government. While Nicaragua and Taiwan have good diplomatic relations, Beijing and Managua do not. Having private investors coming from the Chinese mainland to Nicaragua seems to be an alternative to diplomatic ties as far as business is concerned.

Worried about their future, people from Rivas have started to voice their discontent. Kenny takes us to his cousin’s uncle, Octavio Ortega, who says that the canal’s project has already been triggering opposition among the region’s campesinos (peasants) for two years.

After the opening ceremony for the construction was held on December 22, 2014, Ortega saw his fears materialize. He has since begun organizing a network of protest leaders throughout the country. For having participated in demonstrations, however, Octavio was violently beaten and jailed for over a week. A growing number of peasants who fought for the Sandinistas during the war have distanced themselves from Daniel Ortega’s government, saying he has betrayed them and accusing him of not being a “real Sandinista” anymore.

“We have to learn how to better organize and protect ourselves," says Octavio. "Some of us are already being followed by the government and I am sometimes scared to sleep at home. The government tries to scare families into keeping quiet while a number of foreign journalists were already expelled.”

Octavio explains how land property functions in Nicaragua, how many properties were redistributed during the Sandinista’s era in the 80’s. But now, the government passed a law that legalizes expropriation without compensating the occupants of a piece of land.

People living in the countryside around Rivas have no other choice than self-sustainability. On his patch of land, Ronal has pigs, cows, chicken, sugar cane and a number of vegetables. Although the canal does not pass through his land directly, he will be expropriated to make room for another “side project.” The vicinity of Lake Nicaragua and its pristine shores will be turned into tourist complexes.

Ronal’s family lives in Tolesmaida, close to Lake Nicaragua. Their village will be erased from the map as well. Villagers there show us the scars of the beatings they suffered in jail. On every house’s wall, they have painted Chinese characters reading “Chinese, get out!” The villagers do not only worry about the impact of mass tourism, but about the lake’s ecosystem as well. More pollution, traffic, noise and salinity will gravely endanger the largest freshwater resource in Latin America. Ronal thinks a lot about the social impact of the Chineses’ arrival. For many villagers, the pending arrival of the Chinese often feels like a modern conquistadora.

“I have heard that they worship dragons and animals,” he says. “The Chinese have a religion and customs so different from our that I wonder  whtether a coexistence will be possible Will they remain among themselves without talking to locals? Will they be violent? Will they try to influence our youths?”

“We are like a battalion,” shouts Ronal’s mother. “The whole family has been in jail and we are not scared to go again.”

We met Don Alejandro’s family in El Palmar, where a four-lane highway will replace the main local road. He has been the region’s guitar manufacturer for decades, and his grandchildren are now taking on the trade. We learned more about the family’s rhythm of life, their farming techniques and the way they see life as campesinos. The family is considering resettling in neighboring Costa Rica in order to remain farmers, should the construction of the road lead to their eviction.

“We barely have the necessary tools and ressources to survive as farmers here," says Don Alejandro. "As you see, everything is done with the machete and we have no tractors and machines to help us. On the other hand, we get to live a quiet life. What will happen to our lifestyle should the road nearby become a highway for trucks?"

The eastern city of Nueva Guinea is located in the eastern side on the Caribbean coast, seven hours by bus from the capital. The canal will be forty kilometers away from their city, and people do not feel directly concerned. Rodriguez is a journalist at Radio Luz, the local Christian radio. He is eager to see the beginning for the construction of the canal. He and his colleagues are tired of their country’s stagnation and they do want to see things change, especially economically.  

“Since the end of the war in Nicaragua, the whole region has stagnated," he says. "People did move back from larger cities to the more isolated regions because it was safe again. But the government didn’t extend regional opportunities as promised. Maybe the canal will change all this."

It takes a three hours hazardous bus ride to reach Puerto Principe from Nueva Guinea. And another six hours on a lancha, a small motorised boat, to arrive at Pollo de Desarollo, a village close to the Caribbean. The village lies on the banks of the Punta Gorda river, that will eventually be enlarged to become the canal. Dina lives with her two sons and daughter in the village’s center, which consists of a baseball field and a few dozen houses. She holds the local “comedor,” a canteen that offers hot meals.

”We didn’t know yet that our village was endangered by the canals construction, this is why I welcomed the Chinese," she says. "They were very polite and paid really well. To be honest, if they come back tomorrow and pay the same amount again, I would still cook for them, despite the canal.”

She always talks with caution, as dozens of policemen currently stay in the village to “protect” a group of doctors carrying out medical surveys in the region. The main Nicaraguan opposition paper, Confidencial, claims that those doctors work hand in hand with the government to find out how much land families own along the canal’s route.

We met one of the doctors at Dina’s place. She tells us that many households refuse the medical visit. Asked about whether the government will have access to their survey, she refused to reply.

Dina also tells us about the visit Chinese engineers paid them some time ago. Around 20 Chinese stayed in her house for two months. They were carrying out ecological and scientific surveys to see whether the canal could pass through the Punta Gorda river. Back then, the Chinese were received quite well.

Aidak, Dina’s oldest son, explains that he doesn’t want to be a campesino in the future: with the canal, tourism will increase and he wishes to become a tourist guide. Dina hopes for good compensation. She is tired of living in an isolated village, and would love to start her life again elsewhere.

Travelling along the canal’s road has definitely raised an important question: Will the canal be built at all? Chamorro, of the Confidencial newspaper, believes that the whole project is a scam. The canal will never be built, but land will be seized at low prices from farmers who will barely benefit from business opportunities reserved for the Nicaraguan economic elite.

This Chinese mega project represents the 74th attempt to built a canal in Nicaragua. It may also be the 74th failure to do so.

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Tabasco's 'Petroleros:' Mexico's Pern...
Nacajuca, Mexico
By jforde89
12 Dec 2014

Oil is everywhere, our way of life depends on that non-renewable resource in a level we could have never imagined. But the "bags of sun" as Carl Sagan called the oil fields are not omnipresent in our world as oil byproducts are. Those zillions of decomposed corpses from millions of years ago only appear at selected spots in the surface of our planet. Sometimes they are found offshore or in deserted areas where no one lives. Other times they appear in densely populated areas, where it's extraction deeply disturbs people's way of life. This is one of those areas. The place where everything started. The water-land where the olmecs, the mother culture of mesoamerica, were already using crude oil for many purposes 3500 years ago.

The economic history of the state of Tabasco, located in southern Mexico, can be resumed in one word: Extraction. One million hectares of lush rainforest were turned into pastures during the logwood and mahogany booms from the 17th century. Cattle were introduced into the cleared areas to make sure the natural ecosystem will not regenerate, and feed the meat markets of Mexico City. In the 70's the prime natural resource of our time made it's grand appearance and the oil boom started.

On average almost 500,000 barrels of high quality oil are extracted each day in Tabasco along with almost 1.5 millions of cubic feet of natural gas, that means 1 barrel for every four inhabitants of the region a day. The Tabasco Shore produces another 300,000 barrels a day. Foreign oil companies have been working in Tabasco for many years. The recent oil reform promoted by president Peña Nieto supposedly will end PEMEX control over Mexico's oil and will turn foreign companies from contractors to shareholders.

The oil region of Tabasco is a densely populated swampy area of around 10,000 square kilometers, known as "La Chontalpa" the land of the Maya-Chontal people. This region was the cradle of civilisation in Mexico and is one of the most diverse regions in the world, culturally and biologically. Most of it's inhabitants remain impoverished and few opportunities are present for young men. Today the local youth dream of becoming a "petrolero" for a chance to earn decent wages, despite the low chances they have of landing a job involving more than cleaning.

Pedro, 17, gets basic cleaning jobs at Poza 123 (Pool 123), if he is lucky donning the signature orange jumpsuit once a month. Julio De La Cruz, a teacher at a primary school in Tapotzingo says that, "None of the people from the surrounding areas have been allowed to enter work on the oil fields other than cleaning, and not one peso has been given back to the communities."

Despite syndicates organized by local leaders to negotiate for a share of the work, most of the labour force contracted by the oil industry is not local. Eliazar Benitez, 65, is originally from Aguascalientes in the centre of Mexico but moved to this area 40 years ago. He has worked with many different companies but all within the oil industry.  

"There are some  120+ oil rigs that sit off the gulf coast with an average of 200-300 people working on each and the workers are mainly foreigners:  Europeans, Japanese, Chinese, Americans and Venezuelans." he said. "They keep the majority of foreign workers off land as not to upset the locals, but you can easily see them when they finish their 28 days on and are flown to land via helicopter. A large percentage end up in local brothels, and it is not unusual to see prostitutes waiting for the workers when they come to land."

The ecological damage caused by oil extraction here has been critical and has generated protests among the rural population since the beggining of the boom. Fish, the natural main source of protein of the region where 40% of the fresh water in Mexico, is now poisoned with heavy metals like mercury, nickel and lead. Patches of oil are omnipresent in the lowlands of the region. 

The Santo Tomas environmental organisation has put in place an oil watch programme they to monitor oil spills on land. However, Hugo Ireta Guzmán, who works with the organization, says that the pollution at sea still poses problems to the local economy. 

"There have been many problems with the local camarones (shrimp)," he said. "Many people used to rely on this as a main source of protein, but now the region imports a lot from other parts of Mexico because of contamination in the sea."

 

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Brazilian Military Police
Salvador Da Bahia, Bahia
By Ralf Falbe
20 Jun 2014

Brazil, Salvador da Bahia, 20.06.2014, Fifa World Cup 2014, France vs. Switzerland, Military Police in the Arena Fonte Nova before the match.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (1...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
21 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (1...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
21 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (1...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
21 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (2...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
21 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (4...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
21 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (1...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
21 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (2...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
21 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (1...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
21 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (2...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
19 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (2...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
19 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (2...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
19 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (2...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
19 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.

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Protests Turn Violent in Sao Paulo (2...
Sao Paulo, Brazil
By Juliana Spinola
19 Jun 2013

Thousands of protesters took over the streets of Sao Paulo throughout the past week, against the rise in public transportation costs and expenses paid by the Brazilian government to host the Confederations Cup and World Cup in 2014. The wave of protests grew. There were clashes with police, invasion of public buildings, many hospitalized and arrested. Now the protests are calmer and the government is responding with a series of important changes required by Social Movements and protestants.