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Egyptian Hunger Strike
Cairo
By Sergi Cabeza
22 Sep 2014

September 22, 2015
Cairo, Egypt

About 170 political prisoners are on a hunger strike in Egyptian prisons according to the ‘We Have Had Enough’ movement which is supporting the action. The first prisoner was Egyptian American Mohamed Soltan who has now been striking for more than 240 days.
Outside the prisons more than 100 people, including journalists, doctors, engineers and lawyers, have joined the hunger strike in sympathy with the prisoners and against the law prohibiting protest demonstrations.
Among the hunger strikers is 22 year old Ahmad Mandouh, a 6th year medical student at Cairo University, who also monitors the health of his fellow strikers. Most of the strikers stop eating for 24 to 48 hours but Ahmad and a number of others continue for indefinite periods, breaking their strike for one day from time to time.
‘We Have Had Enough’ says the strike will go on until all political prisoners are released.

Shot List / Soundbites

0'- Ahmad tells the 4 other hunger strikers based in the Eish & Horreya (Bread and Freedom) party premises to wake up in the morning.

10'- Two of the guys in the room prepare for their hygienc morning visit to the toilet.

15'- Ahmad prepares his tools to conduct medical tests.

21'- He has a notebook to follow the medical evolution of the strikers

26'- I'm supervising the strike, the medical situation of the strikers. I follow them up looking for the medical status and doing medical examination for them taking blood presure and taking blood glucose level to follow them up if someone get tired or get sick, so I can help him early.

50'- Ahmad measures the blood presure of one of the strikers

57'- Ahmad measures the blood glucose levels

1' 09'- He explains the situation of one of the strikers: “He striked about one week and he broke the strike and now he just started over again”

1'19''- Blood pressure from close range

1'30'' – Next striker

1'33''- Zoom on Ahmad

1'37''- I think (The Hunger Strike) it's a new strategy. We can support each other, we can support the prisoners, We can brake the protest law if we join and support each other. Actually we sacrifice our lives to brake the law and to support the prisoners and to ask the government to free them out. So I think it can help, the strike.

2'11''- It's a great thing that Mahienour got released, we are so happy, but we still have prisoners so we will continue our strike until our political prisoners get out from the jail and

2'27''- The guys chat in the room were they spend most of their time

2'33''- Another point of view

2'37''- My name is Yasser Mohamed, from the 6 of April movement. I'm 21 and have been on Hunger Strike for 7 days... (TRANSLATION MISSING)

2'54''- Ahmad heads to the Journalists Syndicate to meet and test other strikers there.

3'03''- Syndicate of journalists

3'06''- The strikers gather in the lobby of the Syndicate

3'12''- Ahmad prepares his tools yet again

3'17'' Turn for a girl to be tested.

3'21'- Posters hanging in the lobby of the syndicate

3'25''- Omar gets his blood glucose levels tested

3'36''- Omar, a freelance journalist: “We are on the second Hunger Strike. We made one on the 13 and 14 of September and now in 21 and 22 of September. Because we are against the protest law. Its against our democratic rights

4'01''- REPEATED

4'06''- A view of the gathering

4'11- END

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A Message For Bashar
Downtown, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

A man with a message to the Syrian president asking him to release the Lebanese hostages in the Syrian prisons who've been there for almost 15 years.

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Protest outside French Embassy in Leb...
French Embassy, Beirut, Lebanon
By U.S. Editor
04 Nov 2012

During the visit of French President Francois Hollande to Lebanon on Sunday, November 4, dozens of Lebanese gathered outside the French Embassy in Beirut demanding the release of Lebanese activist Georges Abdullah who has been jailed in France since 1984 over alleged involvement in the killing of a US security official and an Israeli diplomat.

The protestors raised signs and posters of Abdullah and shouted statements demanding his release.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Simon Abdullah, Georges’ brother:
“Today, the French President is coming to Lebanon to teach us democracy and tell us about human rights and freedom. At the same time, his jails imprison a young man for 28 years in violation of the French law. We hope that the Lebanese authorities remind France’s President that there is a prisoner in the French jails and that if he talks about democracy let him release Georges Abdullah.”

Abdullah used to be a communist activist and he was sentenced to a maximum of 18 years in prison but he remained in custody in France for the past 28 years.

His brother Joseph claims that George’s detention is due to American and Israeli pressure and because Lebanon has not demanded his release from the French authorities.

Abdullah always says in courtrooms that he would return to his struggle to liberate Palestine from the Israelis once he is released.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: November 4, 2012
Shooting Location: Beirut, Lebanon
Publishing Time: November 4, 2012
Length: 0:01:42
Video Size: 84.1 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot, dozens of protestors outside the French Embassy in Beirut
2. Medium shot, a group of security men outside the French Embassy
3. Medium shot, sign at the French Embassy in Beirut reading “AMBASSADE DE FRANCE”
4. Various shots of protestors raising signs and posters of Georges Abdullah and shouting statements demanding his release
5. Various shots of protestors holding posters of Georges Abdullah reading “I am Georges Abdullah”
6. Tilt down, a protestor raising a sign with Abdullah’s picture reading “Enough 29 years of oppression… Freedom to Georges Abdullah”
7. Various shots of today’s meeting of French President François Hollande with Lebanese President Michel Suleiman
8. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Simon Abdullah, Georges’ brother:
“Today, the French President is coming to Lebanon to teach us democracy and tell us about human rights and freedom. At the same time, his jails imprison a young man for 28 years in violation of the French law. We hope that the Lebanese authorities remind France’s President that there is a prisoner in the French jails and that if he talks about democracy let him release Georges Abdullah.” 9. Various shots of protestors raising signs and posters of Georges Abdullah and shouting statements demanding his release
10. Wide shot, dozens of protestors lined up and holding a large sign reading “Freedom to struggler Georges Abdullah”

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Bahrainis Gather Despite Ban
Duraz, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
02 Nov 2012

The Bahraini people, challenging authorities' decision to ban all political gatherings, succeeded today, Friday, November 2, 2012, in organizing marches, demanding that officials free a well-known opposition leader Mr. Hassan Mishaima who is allegedly complaining of symptoms from cancer. Demonstrations occurred in several villages around Manama with protesters calling for real transformation, democracy and freedom.

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Bahrain Opposition Protest Despite Ban
Duraz, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
02 Nov 2012

The Bahraini people, challenging authorities' decision to ban all political gatherings, succeeded today, Friday, November 2, 2012, in organizing marches, demanding that officials free a well-known opposition leader Mr. Hassan Mishaima who is allegedly complaining of symptoms from cancer. Demonstrations occurred in several villages around Manama with protesters calling for real transformation, democracy and freedom.

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Bahrainis Face Security & Protest Des...
Duraz, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
02 Nov 2012

The Bahraini people, challenging authorities' decision to ban all political gatherings, succeeded today, Friday, November 2, 2012, in organizing marches, demanding that officials free a well-known opposition leader Mr. Hassan Mishaima who is allegedly complaining of symptoms from cancer. Demonstrations occurred in several villages around Manama with protesters calling for real transformation, democracy and freedom.

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View From Above - Bahraini People Gat...
Duraz, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
02 Nov 2012

The Bahraini people, challenging authorities' decision to ban all political gatherings, succeeded today, Friday, November 2, 2012, in organizing marches, demanding that officials free a well-known opposition leader Mr. Hassan Mishaima who is allegedly complaining of symptoms from cancer. Demonstrations occurred in several villages around Manama with protesters calling for real transformation, democracy and freedom.

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MASSIVE PROTESTS IN BAHRAIN, VENEZUEL...
Manama, Bahrain
By Editor's Picks
04 Oct 2012

Thousands of Bahraini people participated in the funeral of the young man Mohammed Ali Mushaima (23 years old) in Aldaih village, west of the capital Manama on Tuesday, October 2, 2012. Mushaima passed away in detention after his deteriorated medical condition was neglected by prison administration.

Henrique Capriles, Venezuela’s Opposition Presidential candidate, gathered almost a million supporters this past Sunday in Caracas, just four days before the end of his campaign and a week until the Election Day against President Hugo Chávez who has been in the government since 1999 and aspires for a third term. Chavez supporters marched on Saturday, September 22, 2012 in Caracas, to show their support for Chavez in an election that could give him another six-year term.

Egyptian political activists, legal experts, NGO members and human rights activists held a press conference on Wednesday, October 3, to announce the formation of the “Egyptian Constitutional Front," intended to be a new constitution-writing panel to draw a new representative constitution.

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Wounded Prisoners (22-24)
Misrata, Libya
By Karim Mostafa
23 Feb 2012

2011 meant big changes for Libya. After forty years in power, former dictator Muammar Gaddafi was ousted from power. But it took an ugly war, and Libyans are now facing the challenge of rebuilding and unifying their country. Among those suffering the consequences are the population of Tawergha, a coastal city of 30,000 inhabitants. During the war, many Tawerghans fought alongside Gaddafi’s forces. Many men were part of laying siege on the neighbouring Misrata, a city that suffered heavily during the months of fighting. When the war was nearing its end, Tawergha was captured by rebel groups from Misrata, who expelled the population and destroyed the houses. The inhabitants were forced to flee; today, many men are imprisoned while women, children and others are dispersed in refugee camps across the country. What will happen to them? The Tawerghans want to return to their homes, but the rebels guarding the city say that they can never come back.