Frame 0004
Syria's Orphans Stuck in Limbo
Reyhanli
By Isabel Hunter
03 Feb 2015

Reyhanli, Turkey

February 3, 2015

As Turkey’s urban refugee population skyrockets, keeping track of the most vulnerable children is becoming impossible and the risk of sexual and work exploitation is increasing. Turkey's traditionally effective orphan care system is overwhelmed and cannot cope with the burden. In such cases, adoption is often a part of the solution. However, adoption remains extremely rare for both cultural reasons and a lack of infrastructure to manage safe and secure adoptions.

Syrian NGO Maram started an orphanage to help protect some of these children. Ruba Shalish, 11, arrived to the orphanage two weeks ago. She had lived with her grandfather, 75-year-old Nadir, in his small garage-house for one year after losing both of her parents in Syria. She is happy at the orphanage and interacting very well with her friends, as shown by her confident performance in a show organized by the orphanage management. While the orphanage can take 75 children, founder Yakzan Shishakly refuses to allow them to be adopted, despite frequent inquiries, fearing that the unregulated adoption system could easily lead to human trafficking. For many, the most logical solution to the crisis is to expand the existing orphanage infrastructure. However, alleviating the growing problem remains a distant reality.

Thumb sm
Gaza's Orphans Begin New Lives
Gaza
By Andrea DiCenzo
25 Aug 2014

August 28, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

Palestinian children orphaned in the 2014 Gaza war begin new lives in the care of extended family and orphanages. While the physical wounds many of them sustained during the 50 day war are healing, their psychological wounds are just beginning to show. Gaza's dismal, blockaded, and underfunded mental health system cannot cope with massive amount of children in need of psychosocial care. Most children will receive no specialized treatment for their deep psychological wounds.

Many children orphaned in the war are now beginning new lives in the care of extended family members. However, as Islam forbids adoption, those who do not have extended family to go to are now under the care of orphanages and will remain so until they are adults.

These photos profile three young girls who lost their parents in the 2014 Gaza conflict and are now looking for a new start as their caretakers help rebuild their shattered lives.

Frame 0004
Orphaned Brothers Struggle to Survive...
Damascus
By Rame ALsayaed
13 Aug 2014

al-Hajar al-Aswad, Damascus
November, 2014

Youssef, 8 years old
Ahmed 12 years old
Um Farah, Aunt

Youssef and Ahmed are two young orphans who are struggling to survive with their two sisters. After losing their father and mother a couple of years ago, the children now struggle to survive in the besieged Damascus neighborhood of al-Hajar al-Aswad.

The children's father was killed during clashes with the Syrian army in their native Deir Ez Zour. Shortly after their father's death, the situation in Deir Ez Zour became too violent and Um Youssef escaped with the children to al-Hajar al-Aswad, a neighborhood in southern Damascus.

In the beginning of 2012, when the mother was standing in line to get some bread for her children, the Syrian government bombed the bakery and Um Youssef was severely injured. Due to the siege imposed on the area by the government, she was not able to get proper treatment for her wounds and she died shortly after. Youssef, Ahmed, and their two sisters became orphans.

After losing their mother, the children's aunt, Um Farah started looking after them. However, their lives did not get easier as Um Farah's ability to care for the children was limited as she was already poor herself and had her own children to look after. Regardless of the challenges, Um Farah did not give up on Youssef and his siblings, and tried to provide for them. However, the siege and resulting poverty forced Youssef and Ahmed to begin providing for themselves.

Now, Youssef and Ahmed scour the streets of al-Hajar al-Aswad for food and anything that they can use to survive.

A typical day for Ahmed and Youssef begins early when they go searching for drinkable water. After their search for water, they head to school in a makeshift classroom that was established by volunteers in al-Hajar al-Aswad. For the boys, school is considered they only good thing in their lives during the war. However, Youssef usually leaves in the middle class to go reserve a place in the line for the public kitchen. Once he reserves his spot he heads back to school.

After school is over, Youssef returns to the kitchen to pick up the food. They then take the food home to have a meal with the rest of the family.
After taking a short rest, they go out searching for firewood, which is the only material available under siege that can be used for cooking and heating. After an exhausting day they go to sleep.

Youssef and Ahmed can no longer remember cartoon shows; they have not watched any since the electricity was cut off two years ago. The only thing they care about is helping their aunt provide food and other needs for the family.

Youssef and Ahmed are examples of many Syrian orphans who struggle to survive.

The Syrian government imposed a siege on al-Hajar al-Aswad at the end of 2012 and the siege has thus far resulted in the death nearly 70 people from starvation and dehydration. The situation is getting worse after the regime increased the siege by cutting off the water in al-Hajar al-Aswad.
TRANSCRIPT:

Interviewer:
Ho do you spend your day Youssef?

Youssef:
We wake my aunt up to tell her that we are going to get water, so she would not worry about us. After we are done, we go to school, and when it is time to go to the kitchen, we take permission from the teacher and leave to go put the buckets and claim our place in line. Then we go back to school and after we are done we go to the kitchen, get the food, and come back home.

Interviewer:
Youssef what do you wish for?

Youssef:
To have my mother and father alive. When I see children with their parents, I feel sad, I see them with their parents, playing and joking, but I cannot do that because my parents are dead and I have nobody but my aunt.

Interviewer:
Youssef what do you want to be when you grow older?

Youssef:
I want to become an FSA fighter

Interviewer:
Why do you want to become and FSA fighter?

Youssef:
I want vengeance from the people who killed my mother and father.

Interviewer:
Ahmed, what do you wish to become when you grow older?

Ahmed:
I want to become a doctor because when my mother was injured, there were no doctors to treat her. That is why I want to become a doctor, so I can treat the ill and the injured.

Interviewer:
Ahmed, what do you wish for?

Ahmed:
I wish the old days would return and I can go back and play with the children I used to play with, and to go back to school and forget about everything and not wake up early to go look for firewood, water and food. That is how we spend our days, very tiring.

Um Farah, their aunt:
Their mother died while she was at the bakery getting bread. A bomb was dropped and her kidney was injured. And their father, he died before their mother did. He was going with some people and carrying a gun and some people betrayed them and 100 men were killed. Their father was one of them. They have nobody, I brought them to look after them and I will not give up on them. For their bad luck, things got worse and life got more difficult. We have been under siege for a year, without food or medical care or anything. We go to the garden and get some edible plants while the children go to the public kitchen and get some food, that is how we are managing.

Interviewer:
How many children are they?

Um Farah, their aunt:
They are four, two older girls and two boys.
That is how we are living, the children go everyday to get water from a place far away, it has been two months since they cut off the water.

Interviewer:
How do the children treat you?

Um Farah, their aunt:
They are great, they call me mom and I do not make them feel that I am only their aunt. I love them very much, and I treat them as if they were my own children.

The teacher:
Youssef’s case is similar to many cases we have here at the school. This child lost his family and he no longer has people to care for him. In the beginning, we felt that he is lonely and isolated, until we knew what his problem was, and as much as possible we tried to push him to communicate with the other children. In addition to that, similar to many other children, they bring buckets and container and take permission to leave class in order to go to the public kitchen and get food so they can survive.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 32
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
04 Jul 2014

A girl at the Saint Ivan Rilski Sofia Institution's playground. Like this little girl, many children, disabled or not, wait for adoption.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 33
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
04 Jul 2014

A little boy stands in the playground of Saint Ivan Rilski Sofia Institution.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 35
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
04 Jul 2014

Feeding bottles for babies in the Saint Ivan Rilski Sofia Institution that houses around a dozen babies.

Thumb sm
IMG_5425.jpg
Shumen
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A nurse plays with two children in the garden of Shumen Institution, the oldest institution in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 01
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A nurse watching over disabled children as they nap at Shumen Institution, the oldest one in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

Shumen Institution is the oldest one in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 05
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A little girl plays in the garden of Shumen Institution. Shumen institution is the oldest in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A little girl rests in her sister's arms. Roma children have the highest rates of abandoned children in Bulgaria.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 08
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A nurse plays with a little girl playing in the garden of Shumen Institution, the oldest institution in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 09
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

Shumen Institution is the oldest one in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 13
Shumen, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

Shumen Institution is the oldest one in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 14
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A doctor and a nurse in front of a sleeping disabled child. Shumen Institution is the oldest one in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 16
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A little girl playing in the garden of Shumen Institution, the oldest institution in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 17
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A doctor and a nurse in front of a sleeping disabled child. Shumen Institution is the oldest one in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 21
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A doctor walking in the courtyard of Shumen's oldest institution. Shumen Institution is the oldest one in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 23
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A little boy playing in the Shumen Institution garden. Shumen institution is the oldest in Bulgaria. It was built in 1935. In the past there were hundreds of children lived here. Because of de-institutionalization, they're now less than a dozen, all with disabilities. During the day, children with light disabilities come to spend the day and then go back to their home at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 24
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

A little girl playing in the garden of Shumen Institution, the oldest institution in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 26
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
02 Jul 2014

Children playing in the garden of Shumen Institution. Shumen Institution is the oldest one in Bulgaria. Built in 1935, it has previously housed hundreds of children. Because of de-institutionalization, they are now less than a dozen children within its walls, all with disabilities. Children with lighter disabilities come to spend the day there before heading back to their homes at night.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 03
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
01 Jul 2014

Dani Dukova welcomes abandoned children in her home for one year before they get adopted. Here, she shows painted hand-prints of all the children she has hosted.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 15
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
01 Jul 2014

Dani Dukova playing with little Anna. Dani Dukova's apartment smells like chocolate cake. When she opens the door, a small brunette with two braids enters. It is Anna, age four. Dani has been in Dukova's care for one year. "It is the fifth child I have at home since I decided to become a host family," explains Dukova. "When the girl first arrived from the institution, she used to bang her head against the walls. It was hard to watch. Now, she's much better. " Dukova knows that one day, Anna will leave when foster parents in Bulgaria or in the United States decide to take her on. "I cry when they leave, but I am very proud of how they have changed in my care," she adds.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 18
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
01 Jul 2014

Dani Dukova playing with little Anna. Dani Dukova's apartment smells like chocolate cake. When she opens the door, a small brunette with two braids enters. It is Anna, age four. Dani has been in Dukova's care for one year. "It is the fifth child I have at home since I decided to become a host family," explains Dukova. "When the girl first arrived from the institution, she used to bang her head against the walls. It was hard to watch. Now, she's much better. " Dukova knows that one day, Anna will leave when foster parents in Bulgaria or in the United States decide to take her on. "I cry when they leave, but I am very proud of how they have changed in my care," she adds.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 19
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
01 Jul 2014

Dani Dukova playing with little Anna. Dani Dukova's apartment smells like chocolate cake. When she opens the door, a small brunette with two braids enters. It is Anna, age four. Dani has been in Dukova's care for one year. "It is the fifth child I have at home since I decided to become a host family," explains Dukova. "When the girl first arrived from the institution, she used to bang her head against the walls. It was hard to watch. Now, she's much better. " Dukova knows that one day, Anna will leave when foster parents in Bulgaria or in the United States decide to take her on. "I cry when they leave, but I am very proud of how they have changed in my care," she adds.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 20
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
01 Jul 2014

Dani Dukova welcomes abandoned children in her home for one year before they get adopted.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 22
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
01 Jul 2014

Dani Dukova playing with little Anna. Dani Dukova's apartment smells like chocolate cake. When she opens the door, a small brunette with two braids enters. It is Anna, age four. Dani has been in Dukova's care for one year. "It is the fifth child I have at home since I decided to become a host family," explains Dukova. "When the girl first arrived from the institution, she used to bang her head against the walls. It was hard to watch. Now, she's much better. " Dukova knows that one day, Anna will leave when foster parents in Bulgaria or in the United States decide to take her on. "I cry when they leave, but I am very proud of how they have changed in my care," she adds.

Thumb sm
Abandoned Children 25
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Simon Letellier
01 Jul 2014

Dani Dukova welcomes abandoned children in her home for one year before they get adopted. On her computer, she shows an older child who was adopted last year.

Thumb sm
Bam: 10 Years After an Earthquake 10
By Ulrik Pedersen
28 Jan 2014

Two orphans, both 11 years old and orphans due to the earthquake. With the international assistance, both private and public funds and extended help from the government the children has a nice orphanage with toys and sports facilities.

Frame 0004
Cyprus Bank Affects Helios Airways Or...
Paralimni, Cyprus
By Vasia Markides
01 Jul 2013

This piece tells the story of the Koutsofta family who suffered the loss of their son, daughter in law and granddaughter in the 2005 Helios Airlines crash. With the recent economic crisis in Cyprus, a second tragedy has struck that particularly affects the life of their grandson, the only surviving member of their son's family.

Frame 0004
Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
09 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Frame 0004
Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
09 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Thumb sm
Kinshasa Street Children (71 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Frame 0004
Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Frame 0004
Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Thumb sm
Kinshasa Street Children (73 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Thumb sm
Kinshasa Street Children (72 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Thumb sm
Kinshasa Street Children (70 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Thumb sm
Kinshasa Street Children (69 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Thumb sm
Kinshasa Street Children (68 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.