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Asylum Seekers in Spain 51
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
16 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (center), 46, from Bolivia, visits Leonor (left) and her partner Nixon at her house in Barcelona, Spain. Leonor, a 67-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 04
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (left), 46, from Bolivia, makes up Josefina's face, at Sant Joan Despí Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. Josefina, a 96-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of elder and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 06
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Bolivian national Gilda Arnez (left), 46, visits Fina and others at her former job at Sant Joan Despí­ Hospital, in Barcelona.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 49
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, visits Maravillas at her house in Cornellà, Barcelona, Spain. Maravillas, a 90-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 50
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, visits Maravillas at her house in Cornellà, Barcelona, Spain. Maravillas, a 90-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 05
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, visits Gustavo (center) at Clinica Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe in Esplugues de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. Gilda used to be his caregiver few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of elder and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

Frame 0004
German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

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"I Lost Hope" - Desperate To Leave Gaza
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
10 Sep 2014

September 10, 2014
Palestine, Gaza

Palestinians desperate to leave the Gaza strip apply for passports in the hope of emigrating. Applications to passport offices and emigration agencies have increased dramatically since the 2014 Gaza war, as many Gazans feel their situation is hopeless.

Shot list:

1: 00.00-00.47 : People applying for passports and other documents at the Gate of Ministry of Interior and Neighboring Private offices.
2: 00.48-01.31: Interview with owner of al-Aqsa office, Salim Hanyya, who talks about the demands of youth about immigration and passports.
3: 01.32-02.06 : PFPL interview insert at the PFPL Gaza office
4: 02.07-07.12 : Interview with Dr. Tholfaqar Swarjo, a PFPL political office member.
5: 07.13-07-20 : Samah Kassab interview insertions at an NGO’s office.
6: 07.21-10.30 : Interview with Samah who talks about his wish to immigrate.
7: 10.31-11.49 : Samah interview insertions
8: 11.50-16.01 : Tamer Hamam interview. Talks about his attempts to immigrate and the reasons behind this step, on a street in Gaza.
9: 16.02-16.15 : Tamer’s interview inserts on a street in Gaza.

Language: Arabic
Transcription:

SOUNDBITE 1: Salim Hanyya, owner of al-Aqsa office (man, Arabic):
"Here we issue passports, and the number of people who come and request for passports is not small, not less than 50 people per day. A lot of the young men who were affected by the war, they had their homes destroyed and so prefer to leave to another country. It is not a small number, the amount of people who want to leave. Everyday we meet with no less than 20-30 people."

SOUNDBITE 2: Dr. Tholfaqar Swarjo, PFPL political office member (man, Arabic)
"They made it happen and allowed them to go to Rome, as if they were giving them the green light for legal and illegal emigration. In the last few weeks we spotted what we can call a case of various types of emigration, legal and illegal. At first it was the case of a dozen people, however now it is mass emigration and well-educated people are leaving the country, claiming that they want to continue their studies abroad or they are traveling for touristic purposes. We know they will never return to Gaza. And there is the illegal emigration, through underground tunnel with the help of institutions that are taking advantage of the situation to benefit financially. This creates a political problem and benefits the Israelis who have been trying to force Palestinians to emigrate for a very long time, to relieve the demographic stress in Gaza and the West Bank.
We are studying this issue and there are special committees that are investigating the problem, and focusing on the smuggling groups. This is also a security issue and can be used in a negative way especially by Israel against the Palestinians.”
Interviewer: Why did this issue appear at this time?
“There is something we call the “outside effect”, since the Palestinian decision is in the hands of regional countries. In addition to the three attacks that happened against Gaza, their goal was to break down the spirit of the Palestinians, to bring the resistance down, and to encourage Palestinians to emigrate. There are also interior factors such as the difficult economic situation, which is hard on all the Palestinians. Even employees in the governmental sector, a lot of employees do not receive their salaries consistently, and that created a huge problem. There is also a huge segment of youth who have no one caring about their interests. They are victims of the conflict between the government of Gaza and the government of Ramallah in the past and now they are victims of the split rulership in Gaza. Having a huge number of emigrants can cause a demographic instability and will have a huge effect on the future of Gaza.
The emigration of great minds is encouraging other people to leave the country. This issue will make the Palestinians weak when face all the conspiracies that are made against them.
The most important thing is to point a finger towards those responsible for this problem. We have talked about subjective and objective factors, but in the end the main cause is the absence of a leading government, or what we call here “the shadow government”, the complete absence of a nationally agreed government, and the lack of people who are able to control the situation. Whatever is going on concerning emigration, can only happen under the nose of the government. It is impossible to go to underground tunnels or, even if they want to, travel in the sea without catching the attention of the government. This means that the government knows about what is going on and they are choosing to ignore it. So each government should be aware of its responsibilities and they should cooperate together according to the agreement of al-Shatee, and to put the interest of the Palestinians above all.”

SOUNDBITE 3: Samah Kassab, Gazan trying to emigrate, (woman, Arabic):
The war was very difficult on all of us, and Israel had attacked Gaza and the rest of Palestine before, but this time was more intense. Until now I feel that we are not completely out of the state of shock. It is true that I was not affected personally, my house was not destroyed and no harm came to my children or my family, but still everything that we were seeing was happening very close to us. Every missile we heard, I kept thinking it was going to hit my house. We saw a lot of dead people, and lots of injured.
I got in a state of depression that I have not been able to get out of yet. I cannot work. I walk in the streets of Gaza and see destruction everywhere. We live by the sea, so we used to hear every bomb. My children put their hands over their ears as they slept. All I wanted was for the war to be over without any loss of life, so I can just leave the country. I just wanted to leave and save my kids and myself. I did not want to stay and I did not want to lose anyone I care about.
All I wanted was for the war to end so I can start with the immigration process.
The problem is that emigration is very difficult for us. The border with Egypt is closed. Traveling from place to place is very hard for us. The only way that might be possible is to get Italy by sea, which is very dangerous and risky. I will have to risk my life and my children's life. I am very confused and I do not whether I should leave or stay but mostly I think I will leave, simply because the war might start again at any second.
Until this moment I am not able to regain my optimism. I am a very simple person and all I want is a safe place, which is all I am looking for. Plus, we as Palestinians do not trust our leaders, there is no clear agenda, and there is no clear political program. We were not included in the plan of our resistance, we did not participate in making this plan, it is a good thing that we resisted the occupation, but at the end we are humans, we love life and we want to live.”

SOUNDBITE 4: Tamer Hamam, Gazan trying to emigrate (man, Arabic)
“I made a decision to immigrate and I actually started the process. I applied to several countries, and asked around about the countries that might grant me a visa. I am not thinking about applying as a refugee, I am thinking about official immigration. I am applying to Australia, New Zealand, and Canada, and I will wait and see which one works. No matter where you are in the world, in Palestine or in the safest country in the world, if you lose a relative, or your job or your home, you might be able to overcome it. What I lost is something I cannot get back: hope. I lost hope. Nothing can help you if you lose hope, even if you have money or a nice house.
Everything in this country forces you to lose hope, the political situation, the economic situation, and the security situation. There is not hope because we do not know what is going to happen, ask the strongest leader here about what is going to happen two years from now, he wouldn’t know, or about what might happen, he could not give you an answer.
The idea of immigrating was always on my mind, but I used to say no, tomorrow will be better and I should stay. However, this war has destroyed every hope we had left. It is a disaster to live without hope, and what is more depressing is the fact that you are not able to achieve any of your dreams and no one you know was able to achieve any of their dreams. No matter where you are, you will not achieve everything you want, but at least you will achieve a few things that will make you feel better about yourself. You cannot accomplish anything, none of the people around you accomplished anything, and everything around you pushes you back. As a photographer, my dream was to become international and to develop my talent, but here, the only thing you chase is daily living. You do not have the time or the luxury to think about creativity. There is no safety socially or economically. If you were lucky enough to get a job, you will remain afraid of them firing you because the company is bankrupt, or a war started and they can no longer operate.
There is no social safety because a civil war might occur anytime and people will turn against each other, because they belong to different parties. You have your brother who belongs to one party and your cousin belongs to another one, and due to that the social bonds between people are lost.
And the most disturbing thing is the issues keep occurring here. Every week you have a different crisis. Once there is a gas crisis, then an electricity crisis, and another time a wages crisis.
What we are suffering from is a slow death, which, in my opinion, is a lot harder than an instant death on the battlefield.”