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Flee (14 of 15)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
11 Jun 2013

Gutama Gallatobati fled persecution in Ethiopia due to his alleged OLF ties, but now finds himself homeless because of his Ethiopian heritage.

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Flee (13 of 15)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
11 Jun 2013

Abdi was the first to be attacked by a group of Egyptian youth over the dam project. He was beaten, and his back still bears the scar from the burns.

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Flee (11 of 15)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
11 Jun 2013

Requests for medication have also been turned down, so the Oromo collect money from the community to purchase the drugs needed.

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Flee (9 of 15)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
11 Jun 2013

Ahmed claims he was attacked in the evening by two Egyptians while outside the UNHCR building. Many refugees have complained about the harassment they have received while protesting.

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Flee (8 of 15)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
11 Jun 2013

Gutama Gallatobati still bears the scars of his dark past, where guards in an Ethiopian prison sliced off flesh from his leg.

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Flee (7 of 15)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
11 Jun 2013

Anwar and his family were recently evicted from their home, a move he says was motivated by his Ethiopian origin. "The landlord calls me each day. She says she will call the police to deport me. To send me back to Ethiopia."

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Flee (6 of 15)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
11 Jun 2013

Many of the refugees shared similar stories about the shaky accusations against them, and how they realize they may never be able to return to their homelands.

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Flee (5 of 15)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
11 Jun 2013

A cotton-candy seller walks through the camp set up by the Oromo. Tensions are gradually mounting, as the locals who live in the surrounding apartments are getting frustrated with the continued presence of the Oromo. "After 6 in the evening, that is when the troubles start," one man tells me. Incidents between the Oromo and Egyptians have increased over the last few days, with the police doing little to mediate the situation.

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Flee (4 of 15)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
11 Jun 2013

Many of the refugees are forced to sleep on scrap cardboard, while sewage water leaks into the grass nearby.

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Flee (3 of 15)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
11 Jun 2013

The refugees have brought many of their belongings with them, uncertain when they will be able to return home.

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Celebration of Sayeda Zeinab (7 of 9)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
04 Jun 2013

The miniature carnival out front of the mosque is a large draw for families, giving children an opportunity to ride swings and play games.

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Celebration of Sayeda Zeinab (6 of 9)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
04 Jun 2013

The celebration isn’t just religious in nature. It’s also a chance for families to shop, play games and socialize.

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Celebration of Sayeda Zeinab (4 of 9)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
04 Jun 2013

An estimated 15,000 people were on the street and entering the mosque, overwhelming the capacity of the building’s entrances and narrow passageways.

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Celebration of Sayeda Zeinab (9 of 9)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
04 Jun 2013

Hundreds gather outside the Sayeda Zeinab mosque celebrating the birthday of the Prophet Mohamed's granddaughter. The constant flow of people often creates a gridlock, and to fill moments of immobility, music starts up and dancing quickly follows.

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Celebration of Sayeda Zeinab (8 of 9)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
04 Jun 2013

An onlooker watches men twirl to the beat of the music. The Sufi style of dancing involves twisting and turning in every direction, becoming a contorted blur.

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Celebration of Sayeda Zeinab (5 of 9)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
04 Jun 2013

Typically seen as a necessary evil by most Egyptians, at the Sayed Zeinab celebration, the demeanor of the police changes dramatically as they pose for photos, laugh and chat with people in the street.

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Celebration of Sayeda Zeinab (3 of 9)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
04 Jun 2013

Inside the Sayed Zeinab mosque, thousands make the final leg of the trek to tomb of the Prophet Mohamed’s granddaughter.

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Celebration of Sayeda Zeinab (2 of 9)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
04 Jun 2013

Exhausted from both the stifling heat and the journey, hundreds of the pious Muslims lay asleep on the carpets inside the mosque. Many have taken the traditional pilgrimage of 7 days from villages in Upper Egypt to visit the tomb of Sayeda Zeinab.

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Celebration of Sayeda Zeinab (1 of 9)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
04 Jun 2013

A child tries to take a photo of the tomb of Sayed Zeinab as his father holds him above the crowds of people filing into the room.

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project
Cairo, Egypt
By Mais Istanbuli
27 May 2013

The Nowhereland Tattoo project in Cairo, Egypt is a underground movement led by two young Venezuelans tattoo artists, Orne Gil and Lorena Mora. The two are combating the country's growing conservatism and cultural and religious taboos associated with body art by opening a tattoo studio. Beyond that, they are attempting to change misconceptions correlated with tattoos, such as a being a mark of criminality or homosexuality, by educating people on tattoo art and how to get it safely.

In Egypt, the project faces many obstacles. In Islam, it is frowned upon for Muslims permanently mark their bodies with tattoos. In a Muslim country such as Egypt, getting body art can have grave consequences - one young man's father, a Salafist, threw corrosive acid on his son after discovering his tattoo.

Despite the fact that the two young artists are forced to work in the shadows in the back of a beauty parlor for now, the practice has spurned a new culture of Arabic calligraphy art, revolution-inspired drawings and poetry. The two remain determined and have a lofty goal of changing attitudes toward body art across not only Egypt, but other Middle Eastern countries and even some in South America. They know that change comes only one step at a time.

This is a photo-essay following the Nowehereland Tattoo Project at work in Cairo, Egypt.

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (12 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - Orne Gil making a tattoo in arabic calligraphy "Freedom, justice, rights"

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (10 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - Orne Gil making a tattoo in arabic calligraphy "Freedom, justice, rights"

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (11 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - A tattoo in arabic calligraphy "Freedom, justice, rights"

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (2 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - Orne Gil and Lorena Mora working in their old studio

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (13 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - a tattoo of the poem of Gamila Alaily, famous Egyptian poet born in 1930. "Who am I? What am I? Wha'ts wrong with me? What is my purpose? Why did I came to this bygone world? The best talking is when it's true. Onesty, in what I say and do"

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (3 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - Orne Gil and Lorena Mora working in their old studio

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (4 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - Orne Gil making the Nefertiti mask tattoo

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (5 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - Edena Salem, the girl who has the Nefertiti mask tattoo, waiting for Orne Gil to finish her work.

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (6 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - Orne Gil making the Nefertiti mask tattoo

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (8 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - A tattoo in arabic "long live free Palestine". Made by a guest of the studio, from Jordan: Fareed el Attar

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (9 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - A tattoo in arabic "long live free Palestine". Made by a guest of the sudio, from Jordan, Fareed el Attar

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Nowhereland Tattoo Project (7 of 13)
Cairo, Egypt
By Ines Della Valle
27 May 2013

Egypt, Cairo, December 2012 - "revolutionary" Nefertiti mask tattoo. This tattoo is a remake, made by the girl who has the tattoo, of a famous graffito in Mohammed Mahmoud Street, the famous street where the "second revolution" took place in November 2011

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Egyptian troops ready to free kidnapp...
Sinai, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
22 May 2013

Story: Egyptian troops ready to free kidnapped soldiers

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: May 21, 2013
Shooting Location: Sinai, Egypt
Publishing Time: May 21, 2013
Length: 00:01:44
Video Size: 85.4 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Various shots of army vehicle movement in Sinai
  2. Various shots of army vehicles
  3. Wide shot of armored vehicle deployed in Sinai, Rafah Crossing border area
  4. Wide shot of the gate of the Rafah Crossing Border closed in protest against the kidnap of the soldiers
  5. Various shots of armored vehicles deployed outside the border
  6. Medium shot of the gate of the border while police closed it and hanging banners at the gate reading (the sit-in will continue until the release of the soldiers)
  7. Various shots of Rafah Crossing Border area
  8. Medium shot of a banner reading (This is a sit-in and not a protest or a vigil)
  9. Various shots of the Rafah Crossing Border while being closed with banners demanding the release of the kidnapped soldiers

STORYLINE:

Egypt’s Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim said that the Egyptian security forces are fully ready to implement a plan to release the seven kidnapped soldiers in Sinai.

The minister said in a statement to the Independent Egyptian newspaper al-Watan that they already have sent 30 armored vehicles, 90 battle groups, special police units tasked with special duties (to free the hostages), noting that the armed forces won’t take part in the operation and its role is limited to the siege of the region.

The entrances to the governorate of Sinai also witnessed a heavy security presence.

Security forces managed to identify the area where the kidnapped have been detained, according to the statement.

On the other hand, the Egyptian army intensified its presence in Sinai by sending more troops, getting ready for a possible military operation to release the seven kidnapped soldiers.

A military source in Sinai said troops are ready for launching the military operation for freeing the seven abducted soldiers and that troops were waiting for the zero hour.

The source added that a military operation to free the soldiers is ready, but they are still waiting for the orders of the president.

The special operations troops which have arrived in Sinai earlier are characterized by a high level of training as they contain members of the contingent 777 which is specialized in combating terrorism and the implementation of these operations.

First Undersecretary of Health Ministry in North Sinai Dr. Tareq Khater said the state of emergency was announced in all the governorate hospitals.

The Egyptian presidency said earlier that all options were open in dealing with the kidnappers of the Sinai soldiers and securing their release.

Police stations in North Sinai have announced a strike in support of the Rafah and Ouga crossings and in protest against the continuation of the crisis of the abducted soldiers.

The Rafah crossing with Gaza still closed for a fifth consecutive day on Tuesday. The police said they would not reopen Rafah crossing until their kidnapped colleagues were released.

End VCS Item

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Tamarod - The "Rebellion" against Morsi
Cairo, Egypt
By zeer news
17 May 2013

Tamarod (Rebellion), is an Egyptian campaign launched by a coalition of groups and movements of the civil society to demand the resignation of President Morsi.
Whenever confronted with critics, waves of protests and clashes, the Muslim Brotherhood constantly repeats that Morsi was democratically elected by more than 13 million people. Thus, Tamarod aims to collect by the end of June, 15 million signatures of people who are asking for Morsi's resignations and early elections.
The initiative - highly symbolic since it has no legal basis in the Egyptian constitution - is gaining ground thanks to the volunteers who are copying and distributing the forms everywhere in the country.

The video is 2 minutes and 18 seconds long and it features interviews and images of people signing the petition.

SHOT LIST
1- woman stopping taxis to give them the form, telling them "It's against Morsi"
2- interview in english with a volunteer. "The goal of Tamarod... we want to explain that we refuse the Muslim Brotherhood regime and Morsi as well"
3- woman distributing the form. Two women walk past saying "We don't want him (Morsi)"
4- interview with second female volunteer. "We are collecting 15 millions petitions... 15 Million petitions, to tell the public opinion in Europe and in Egypt that Morsi has to resign".
5- Three shots of the second volunteer collecting signatures and showing the papers.
6- close shot of woman holding the "Tamarod" petition. In the background we can hear demonstrators saying "we want the fall of the regime"
7- Eight shots of people signing forms. One guy waiting for a man to take a picture of him holding the Tamarod petition. Background interview in English with the first volunteer saying "Their excuse is that Morsi received 15 million votes, so we are trying to show them that more than this number refuses the Muslim Brotherhood. This is not just from Cairo, but also a lot of states (governorates) like Alexandria, Suez as well, Port Said and some cities in Upper Egypt"
8- volunteer talking to a man at intersection, while another man on a motorcycle reads the Tamarod papers
9- Interview in arabic with young volunteer from Alexandria. "The next 30 of June we will have collected 15 million requests or more...."
10- Young volunteers stopping cars to distribute the petition in Mohamed Mahmoud Street. The interview continues in the background "The government of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) and the one of Morsi, the present government of the Muslim Brotherhood, did not break with the past, with Mubarak. The government of Morsi and that of Mubarak are the same". "For this reason the Egyptian people are returning again to the streets, to the square (Tahrir), to let Morsi and his group know "we don't want you!"
11- shots of women chanting in Tahrir square. "A new revolution in the square" and "down with Morsi"
12- interview in arabic with second volunteer "we don't want Mubarak or Morsi. We want young people, people from here, from Tahrir"
13- Woman with three children holding the "Tamarod signs" and singing "Erhal (Leave)"

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CITIZENS OF A DEAD CITY
Cairo, Egypt
By serengeti1 serengeti1
15 May 2013

The world understands the value of the pyramids, the sphynx. Cairo today is a bustling world city at the receiving end of the so called Arab Spring - a collective cry from the people of Egypt for a better future. But where are the voices of the people living on the fringes of Egytian society, people like the half a million "citizens" of The City of the Dead -- a massive cemetary in the heart of Cairo.
At a time when journalists were banned from el Arafa, this video crew slipped into the cemetary and managed to get a snapshot of lives being lived among the dead of Cairo.

For understandable reasons no one in this piece can be identified. I promised to respect their wishes. Clients are welcome to use nom-de plumes wherever they wish.

BACKGROUND TO THE PIECE
(NOTE: CLIENT SHOULD SUPPLY LATEST TAHRIR SQUARE CIVIL UNREST FOOTAGE) At a time of ongoing political unrest and turmoil, when thousands Egyptians fill Tahrir Square in search of political stability and economic freedom, there is a dark side to Cairo’s social order. It’s a side of Cairo life seldom exposed to the outside world. Few people in Cairo speak of it. It’s a subject never brought up in polite conversation, or over dinner tables. It’s part of Cairo’s national buried conscience, a collective embarrassment, if you will.
It’ s the City of the Dead, el Arafa, also called Qarafa by the Cairenes – the people of Cairo. This four mile (6.4k,) long necropolis (cemetery)with its dense tomb and mausoleum structures, below the Mokattam hills in south eastern Cairo is home to over 500 000 people who live and work among the dead. Some are refugees from other parts of Egypt, from the earth quake of 1992, or from city demolitions and urban renewal programs. Some want to be near their loved ones, recent or ancient relatives. The poorest live in the City of the Dead slum, locally known as Manshiyat naser, also known as Garbage City. During the time of Mubarrak, foreign journalists were expelled if they reported on el Arafa. They were warned to pay no attention to the City of the Dead if they ever wanted to return to Egypt.
But today, many of those marching for a better future on Tahrir Square come from Qarafa. Here, among the tombs and the sarcophagi and mausoleums, children are born, people cry, laugh, and live their extraordinary invisible lives. High rent and rampant unemployment in Cairo have forced people into the cemetery. The majority of these citizens of el Arafa are Muslims, but there are a few scattered Christian families as well.
Many of the tombs are house-like: a tradition that stems from ancient Egypt. What cuts these people off from the rest of Cairo – and also adds to the mystique of the place - are massive walls that surrounds the “city” on all four sides. Some tombs are very old but people are still buried there ever day. There are two separate rooms for men and women in most of the tombs; before the funeral , people are interred in an opening in the ground in the basement of the tomb and covered by a stone slab. During the funeral the stone slab is removed and the body is placed on a shelf...which concludes the internment process.
Access to the City of the Dead is not easy. The “citizens” generally don’t like tourists or cameras and are as a rule not very welcoming to strangers. This crew managed to get special permission from the locals to film in the City of the Dead only for four hours one night. We also had to hide from Mubarrak’s police, since it was officially forbidden for foreign journalist to report from the City of the Dead.
Now for the first time, with Mabarrak gone, these images can be shown.

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Suez Canal Development Conference in ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
14 May 2013

Story: Suez Canal Development Conference in Cairo

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: May 13, 2013
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: May 13, 2013
Length: 00:02:23
Video Size: 117 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Pan left shot of the banner of the conference
  2. Various shots of the conference held at Cairo International Conference Centre
  3. Various shots of attendees at the inauguration of the conference
  4. Medium shot a display showing details about the project
  5. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egypt’s PM Dr. Hesham Qandil:
    “This project took into account all the criteria of the national security and all the demands and the remarks of the armed forces. I would like to affirm that the security of this country and the safety of its territories take precedence over any other issue and of course this position include the government, opposition and the Egyptian people as well. We all agree upon this issue (Egypt’s security) and there is no difference among us about that.”
  6. Various shots of attendees during the conference
  7. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – head of International Business & Investment Association (IBIA), Ahmad Galal El-Deen:
    “This conference is not an ordinary event. We are currently in the process of historic event and we hope it would be the development engine in Egypt. We are in the process of international project that will contribute in transferring Egypt to the ranks of the major countries and it will represent a focal point in the international trade.”
  8. SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Housing Minister Tarek Wafiq:
    “The law of the project is now in the process of developing some amendments and then sending it from the office of the prime minister to the Shura Council to discuss it.”
  9. Various shots of attendees during the conference

STORYLINE:

International Business & Investment Association (IBIA) in cooperation with the technical secretariat of the Suez Canal axis development project organized on Monday, May 13, the first international conference on the development of the Suez Canal.

The conference held under the auspices of Egyptian Prime Minister Dr. Hisham Qandil. He said the draft law of the Suez Canal development took into account all the criteria of the national security and the armed forces.

The Premier also witnessed the signing of a number of contracts of new projects.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egypt’s PM Dr. Hesham Qandil:
“This project took into account all the criteria of the national security and all the demands and the remarks of the armed forces. I would like to affirm that the security of this country and the safety of its territories take precedence over any other issue and of course this position include the government, opposition and the Egyptian people as well. We all agree upon this issue (Egypt’s security) and there is no difference among us about that.”

The conference was attended by a number of army leaders, Chairman of Suez Canal authority, experts, Minister of Planning and International Cooperation, Minister of Housing and Urban Communities and a large number of Egyptian businessmen and Arab investors.

For his part, Housing Minister Tarek Wafiq confirmed that Suez Canal development authority had stressed in its establishment draft law that neither Egyptian nor foreign investors will have the right of possession in Suez Canal Development Corridor projects, noting that this will happen through usufruct right only.

He added that the Suez Canal axis project is the dreaming of Egypt and all Egyptians, it is the future project for new Egypt thus it won’t be accounted by other party or it won’t be monopolized by any opinion.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – head of International Business & Investment Association (IBIA), Ahmad Galal El-Deen:
“This conference is not an ordinary event. We are currently in the process of historic event and we hope it would be the development engine in Egypt. We are in the process of international project that will contribute in transferring Egypt to the ranks of the major countries and it will represent a focal point in the international trade.”

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Housing Minister Tarek Wafiq:
“The law of the project is now in the process of developing some amendments and then sending it from the office of the prime minister to the Shura Council to discuss it.”

The Minister added that Suez Canal region is a part of the sustainable development strategy that will make Egypt an international trade point.

Moreover, the Minster has asserted that the draft law which has finalized is currently exist by Cabinet, it will be sent to Shura Council, many various ministries and sovereign authorities and a number of experts law have participated in the project.

President Mohamed Morsi has called for expediting the implementation steps for the Suez Canal Corridor project in view of its positive effect in supporting the Egyptian economy, luring foreign investments, providing thousands of job opportunities for Egyptians in general and Sinai citizens and the Canal region in particular.

End VCS Item

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First Disabled Man To Climb St. Cathe...
Cairo, Egypt
By zeer news
11 May 2013

Mazen, the first disabled person to climb St Catherine mountain in Sinai, promoting rights for disabled in Egypt

Background:

Mazen is the first disabled person to climb Mount Saint Catherine in Sinai, to promote rights for the handicapped in Egypt. Mazen contracted polio when he was 3 years old, while he was escaping Iraq with his family during the First Gulf War.

According to World Health Organization’s statistics, 10% of Egypt’s total population suffers from physical or mental disabilities. The 1975 Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons law didn't bring progress to the living conditions of the disabled. During the two years that followed the revolution, with 18 months of military rule followed by the Muslim Brotherhood’s government, Egypt’s handicapped population, estimated at over 8 million, continue to face more of the same problems. The precarious and difficult situation in a city like Cairo, one of the most chaotic in the world due to a substantial lack of infrastructure, is unfortunately only one of the many problems handicapped people face in Egypt. A lack of rights, health care and increased social marginalization inspired Mazen, who has been handicapped since the age of 3, to get involved in political activism, prompting him to join the 6th of April movement in 2010.

In November 2012, during the Mohamed Mahmoud clashes, Mazen lost his close friend and companion of the 6th of April movement, Gika. Since then, he decided to change his methods of protest, and to start a more responsible and peaceful activism campaign through symbolic actions.

Three months ago, he completed the first of several actions, climbing the Keops pyramid in Giza. On the 6th of April 2013, for the anniversary of the movement, he decided to climb the 1586 m and 750 stairs of mount Saint Catherine in Sinai.

Shots:
00:00 - 00: 44 sec intro VO

Mazen is the first disabled person to climb mount Sinai, promoting rights for handicapped people in Egypt.

According to World Health Organization, 10% of Egypt’s population, over 8 million people suffer from a disability. The Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons law of 1975 didn't improve their living conditions. In Egypt little attention is paid to the difficulties of the handicapped, especially in Cairo, one of the most chaotic cities in the world, there is a shortage of infrastructure to the assist their mobility. This is compounded by the lack of rights, poor health care and social marginalization. Mazen, handicapped since the age of 3, was inspired to get involved in political activism, before the revolution.

00:44 – 01:39 interview : presentation and problems of handicapped people in Egypt

“I am Mazen Hamza, I am 26 years old. I was born in 1987 in Iraq. I came in Egypt during the First Gulf War. I contracted the polio when I was three years old because of the vaccination. ”

“The problems that handicapped people suffer here in Egypt have been the reason why I decided to enter political activism, in order to send a message to the entire world, that handicapped people have to be integrated into society. We have problems in all aspects, in transportation, in education, in work, in housing, in airplanes, and mostly in the treatment we received by the government. I mean the government does not know how to treat handicapped people.”

01:40 – 02:03 political activism VO 6th of April / sit-in of 6th of April in front of the Ministry of Interior

Mazen became a political activist in February 2011 when he joined the 6th of April movement, the most active civil rights movements in Egypt. He first participated in debates, demonstrations and sit-ins.

In November 2012, during the clash with Security Forces and the Military Government, Mazen lost his close friend Gika, a fellow activist. This inspired him to begin a campaign of peaceful activism through symbolic demonstrations.

02:04- 02:47 Interview talk about gika / inside Gika's family house

“The death of Gika influenced us a lot. He was a boy that put a beautiful energy within us. Climbing the Cheope Pyramid has been only the beginning of many activities in urban, historical and religious places. We started by climbing the pyramid and it has had a lot of success, we heard good feedback from the people. I am not speaking about the public’s opinion, but from the other activists.”

02:48- 03:18 VO actions: Saint Catherine

Three months ago, Mazen completed the first of his demonstrations, climbing the Haram Cheope, the great pyramid of Giza. Then, on April 6, for the seventh anniversary of the movement, he climbed the 1586 m of Mount Sinai including the 750 “stairs of penitence”. In the Christian, Muslim and Jewish traditions, Mount Sinai is where Moses received the Ten Commandments. Overcoming his physical limitations, Mazen reached the summit in order to raise awareness for the disabled population and to remember those who died for human rights in Egypt.

03:18- 05:12 climbing St Cathrine, reaching the summit

05:12- 05: 27 interview St. Cathrine

“I would like the world to be aware of what’s going on in Egypt. For this reason I climbed St Catherine mountain, where Moses spoke with his God, to bring his speech all around the world, and I am doing the same thing to make people care about the handicapped women, children, and society and in general human rights.”

05: 28 Mazen Screaming the name of “Gika”.

Other text (Arabic translation):

“When I found out that there were young people ready for revolution, I joined them for months to take down the regime, and change the system. After two years I feel that nothing has changed. We have a new president, but the same system, so I tried to be different.

I started to work with the movement by participating in demonstrations and other activities. When I found out about the 6th of April movement, I joined it immediately. I joined the movement on the anniversary of the clashes of Mohammed Mahmud. In the Moquattam group, I was just an activist, but after I became responsible for social policies. I joined many events, especially for handicapped people’s rights.”

I attend a lot of conference to spread their voices everywhere, and to raise awareness of the problems of disabled people.
I tried to see the system separately from religious or historic dogma. I would like the world to be aware of what’s going on in Egypt. For this reason I climbed St Catherine mountain, where Moses spoke with his God, to bring his speech all around the world. And I am doing the same thing to make people care about the handicapped, women, children, and society and in general human rights,

We have a problem with the system. Politicians don’t listen to our demands, but we will make them listen and change their policies to how young people want them.

I am a citizen who sees that people will soon organize themselves to bring a real change. Tomorrow will be better, but now we still need to spend a lot of energy, even if we already spent a lot. That’s why we are climbing St. Catherine mountain, we already climbed 2350 meters and we only have to climb 750 stairs. That is the fight with myself against the system and the entire world, and I will do more, or my efforts will be vane.

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Port Said Massacre 13
Port Said, Egypt
By jonathanrashad
06 May 2013

Graffiti showing one of the 21 defendants sentenced to death for their alleged role in the massacre in Port Said. Many of them are believed to have been randomly arrested.

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Port Said Massacre
Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
06 May 2013

Tears in the eyes, rocks on the ground, and blood on the pavements - as injustice prevails.

On the 1st of February 2012, Port Said stadium witnessed the biggest catastrophe in Egypt's recent history, in a match between Cairo's al-Ahly club and Port Said's al-Masry club. Under the auspices of the police, 72 football fans from al-Ahly's biggest fanclub 'Ultras Ahlawi' were slaughtered in the stadium that day by paid thugs and football fans from Port Said city.

Contrary to protocol, police did not search al-Masry fans, who wielded knives, swords, stones, and fireworks. As clashes broke out towards the end of the match, police forces did not intervene. Instead, they withdrew from the stadium, welded the doors, and turned off the stadium lights. In the meantime, Ultras Ahlawy were being chased, stabbed, choked, and thrown off grandstands.

"It was a nightmare. I had to cover myself with my friend's blood to escape the thugs who were chasing me," said Ahmad Sabry, who witnessed the death of his childhood friend.

Most of the fans killed in the stadium were between the age of thirteen and twenty. The massacre took place within a twenty-minute frenzy.

This massacre happened against the backdrop of an ongoing vendetta between the police and Ultras Ahlawy, that has manifested itself in repeated clashes since the group's inception in 2007. Many believe that the police orchestrated this massacre to retaliate for the humiliation suffered a the hands of the Ultras, who fiercly fought off the police during the 2011 Egyptian revolution.