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Syria: Battling Cancer in Besieged Gh...
Eastern Ghouta
By Jawad Arbini
10 Jun 2015

10 year old Ammar suffers from neuroblastoma, a rare type of childhood cancer that develops in infants and young children. Ammar lives with his family in the opposition-held area of Douma, in Eastern Ghouta. The residents of Eastern Ghouta have been surviving under extremely hard living conditions due to the ongoing siege imposed by the Assad regime's forces over the past two years.

In Dar al-Rahma, the only active cancer center operating in Eastern Ghouta, Dr. Wissam says that Ammar suffered sever emotional trauma, which was the primary cause of his neuroblastoma.

Ammar’s mother remembers when, nearly 3 years ago, heavy clashes and shelling erupted in the neighborhood where they reside. The clashes lasted for three hours and severely terrified Ammar. Since then the boy had suffered from fever and continuous sickness.

Dr. Wissam also stressed that with very little resources, Dar al-Rahma center is currently treating about 600 patients suffering from different types of cancer with an 11% death-rate.

Unfortunately, Transterra Media received a message on the night of Saturday, June 13, 2015 announcing the death of Ammar.

Transcription:

  • (02:27) Um Ammar, Ammar’s mother (woman, Arabic):

Ammar was sitting at the balcony when shelling and clashes erupted, he was extremely terrified, since then he suffered from continuous fever and sickness. We took him to the doctor who examined him and found out that he has neuroblastoma. It’s a rare disease that infects one out of every 10,00 children, and the reason is emotional trauma. (02:50)

(02:51) Given that the area is besieged, how are you receiving Ammar’s medications? (02:58)

(02:58) The doctor gets part of them, but we were responsible to get the rest. There are also some medical tests that the doctor asks us to do, but we cannot send it for analysis in Damascus. This is an additional reason why his situation is relapsing, not being able to deliver the medical tests to Damascus. This made his recovery take more time. This led [Ammar] to loose his sight. We are hoping, but we don’t think he could get any better now (03:38).

(03:40) Under the siege, should Ammar follow a specific diet program? (03:45).

(03:46) The doctor says that half of the treatment is done through his diet program. Alhamdulillah we are doing all what we can. We cannot do anything more. Yes, he should follow a specific diet program, unlike other children (04:02).

  • Doctor Wissam, Doctor specialized in cancer diseases (woman, Arabic):

(04:24) At first, Ammar was diagnosed after he was suffered from a shock. He suffered from continuous sweating and fever, and he was later diagnosed with neuroblastoma. He started with this treatment and then had to stop it at the (name of the previous hospital) where he had already started the treatment, and came to continue the treatment here. When he got here, he was already in the recovery stage, but unfortunately, within two months, his situation relapsed dramatically due to a psychological trauma. We had to start a new treatment phase. One of the reasons why his treatment was delayed was the lack of the MRI Scanners. In addition of the lack of the medications, either because a delay in the supply or because of the hard situation to get the medications in Ghouta, we are trying at the moment to stay in contact with international organizations such as the Red Crescent or other organizations responsible for swelling diseases, perhaps Ammar has any chance [by getting the medications inside Ghouta]. (05:32).

(05:33) What are the efforts that this medical centre is doing under the siege? (05:40).

(05:41) At the moment we have more than 600 persons who are documented of having swelling diseases that are under treatment, and a percentage of 30% of recovery, and 10.5% of deaths. We are trying to give them the medications as much as possible, but we are facing some difficulties in doing so. The besiege and the diet factor are playing a negative role in the process, because it is known that the cancer patient needs a specific food diet program so that his body can bear the medications he is receiving. In addition of course to the negative psychological factor (06:22).

  • Heba, Nurse (woman, Arabic):

(08:16) Here’s a breast eradication with part of the other breast and some parts of the armpit.. we take samples of the armpit and sample of the breast to check how bad is the infection, we record it and we send it for the lab analysis.

  • Abu Khaled, Managing Director of Dar al-Rahma center (man, Arabic):

(08:29) Sometimes the patient comes and take the dose of the medications to make the swelling smaller. We are sometimes in need of a surgery, but unfortunately, most of the medical centers that do these surgeries stopped their operations. The reason is because their efforts are put only for the injured people. This reason sometimes plays a negative role in the recovery of the patients, because the patients who are not getting this surgery have their situation relapsed.

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Dreadful Disease Appears in Eastern G...
Ghouta
By Mohamad al-jazaare
24 Dec 2014

Hamourieh, Eastern Ghouta, Syria

Harsh humanitarian conditions in besieged Eastern Ghouta near Damascus have caused a rare, grisly disease surface. Young Hiba is being treated from myiasis, a skin infestation caused fly maggots.

Staff at the local Dar al-Rahma Medical Center (DRMC) are doing their best to offer Hiba and other patients proper care, despite the severe shortage of medical supplies in Eastern Ghouta.

The center is also treating many patients from cancer. Tasneem is a five-year-old girl who is diagnosed with leukemia. DRMC’s director Dr. Wissam says that she and her colleagues face a large difficulty in providing cancer medications that will not expire soon.

Shot List

1 Various of Dr. Wissam picking worms out of Hiba (young girl)’s scalp.

Natural Sound (Arabic, Woman and man) conversation between Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center and Hiba’s father

Dr. Wissam: “These are pouches. If we do not clean them they might be hiding something bigger. I do not like this area. They should not have remained.”

Father: “Her mother is giving her a shower every day.”

Dr. Wissam: “There is a lack of education and awareness (…). These remaining pouches will not help me. I wanted to see her in two days but I do not want to see anything like this.”

2 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center

(01:12) “Hiba’s case is the first case of miyasis that we diagnosed in Eastern Ghouta. Her scalp is infected. Such diseases are due to the lack of pesticides, which causes the appearance of large houseflies. In addition to that, these diseases are caused by the lack of water in the area.” (01:29)

(01:29) “At the moment, the girl’s condition has improved, and she is healing and under medical observation. We hope not to discover new cases.” (01:35)

3 Wide of Dr. Wissam, Hiba and Hiba’s father at the medical center.

Natural Sound

Dr. Wissam: “This is why she was in pain and could not sleep. After they [the worms] were taken out, she felt better. She has not been complaining of any pain.”

Father: “Not at all.”

Dr. Wissam: “We will only observe her. If anything appears, we will see it immediately. I do not want to cut her [scalp].”

4 SOUNDBITE (Man, Arabic) Ahmad, Hiba’s Father and an unidentified woman

(02:26) “It all started a week ago, and we thought it was an allergy. I took her to the medical dispensary where they prescribed her a medication and ointments. I then took her to another dispensary in Harasta where they told me it was probably impetigo [a skin disease] and they prescribed her an ointment. But my daughter was in a lot of pain, and I thought it does not look like a normal allergy. So I brought her here after her situation got worse and she was in pain at night. We feared that she might had a malignant disease. When we discovered that she had worms in her head, we directly thought that this was not normal. We brought her here.” (03:16)

5 Close up of Dr. Wissam taking worms out of Hiba’s scalp.

Natural Sound (Arabic) Conversation among

Dr. Wissam: “Do we have tweezers? [UNINTELLIGIBLE] Do you know blue flies? These are blue flies’ eggs.”

Father: “What about this?”

Dr. Wissam: “You have to shave her head, brother. Alright?”

Father: “Yes”

Dr. Wissam: “Because they are hiding in the hair. If there is anything that has not come out…”

Unseen woman: “How could they say it is normal and the girl was not hit by a bullet or did cut her head?”

Father: “They diagnosed it as impetigo.”

Unseen woman: “When did this start, doctor?

Doctor Wissam: “Three days ago.”

Father: “Three days ago, she started having a headache.”

Unseen woman:”How did this decay happen?”

Dr. Wissam: “It started before.”

Father: “Her face and neck were swollen.”

Unseen woman: “How did the fly lay its eggs here?”

Dr. Wissam: “Only God knows. One, two, three, four, five, six – six worms from a single spot. I once received a patient whose eye was eaten [by worms].”

6 Various of street. Natural Sound: (Arabic) Call for prayer.

7 Various of Tasneem, young girl in hospital bed

8 Various of Doctor Wissam injecting needle in Tasneem. Natural Sound: “Give me your hand.”

9 Close up of serum dripping

10 Various of Tasneem in hospital bed.

11 Various of Doctor Wissam injecting needle in Tasneem.

Natural Sound: Tasneem crying, Doctor saying to her: “We will only remove this. It is over. We removed it. It is over. It is over. There is nothing.”

12 SOUNDBITE (Woman, Arabic) Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center

(09:20) Tasneem is a young girl aged five; she suffers from severe lymphocytic inflammation after her father was martyred. She is currently under treatment, but we are facing obstacles in supplying medicaments that have long shelf lives due to the siege on Ghouta (09:35).

(09:35) “Tasneem is not the only child who suffers from this disease. The number of children diagnosed with such diseases increased lately, due to the conditions under the siege on Ghouta. [Inadequate] nutrition or environment, as well as psychological factors largely increase the rate of these diseases.” (09:52)

13 Various of petri dish preparation

14 SOUNDBITE (Woman, Arabic) Um Imad, Tasneem’s grandmother

(10:17) Tanseem has had leukaemia for almost two years. She was treated in Damascus first, but due to circumstances we could no longer go there, I mean because of the siege. Two months ago, the condition resurfaced and we came to this center where she is being treated, thanks be to God. I wish that God rewards them [medical center workers] well (10:46)

15 Various of Tasneem walking

16 SOUNDBITE (Girl, Arabic) Tanseem, girl suffering from cancer

(11:08) My name is Tasneem. I wake up every morning, I go to school and then I play with Toufic. My grandmother then takes me to the office [clinic]; they insert a needle into my vein [UNINTELLIGIBLE].

17 Wide of Tasneem playing with other children.

18 SOUNDBITE (Girl, Arabic) Tanseem, girl suffering from cancer

(11:40) “Here is my father’s photo. He was going to Dukhanya [town in Eastern Ghouta] when he was shot by a sniper and martyred.”

“This is my cousin, I always play with her. And this is Toufic, he is older than I am. He always plays with me. This is Mohammad, my younger brother. He does not give his mother a hard time.”

“Bye.”

19 Various of decomposing cattle carcasses

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Albinism in Tanzania 03
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
23 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 23, 2014 - Sista Laurentina Bukombe doing a skin check-up during the trimestral meeting. She is a nun graduated in dermatology who is collaborating with Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre and Tulime Association, providing albinos with sunscreen lotion, medical check-ups and proper treatment if needed. In this area there had never been killings, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun.

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Albinism in Tanzania 02
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
21 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 21, 2014 - Alufema mends a carpet. She is one of the persons with albinism of the Kilolo District censed by the Tulime Association. There have never been killings in this area, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun. The census was fundamental in order to be able to help the albinos of the area with sunscreen cream and medical check-ups. The national census does not provide correct and actual data about albinism.

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Albinism in Tanzania 07
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
21 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 21, 2014 - Angela with one of her four children, none of whom have albinism. She is one of the persons with albinism of the Kilolo District censed by Tulime Association. There have never been killings in this area, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun. The census was fundamental in order to be able to help the albinos of the area with sunscreen cream and medical check-up. The national census does not provide correct and actual data about albinism.

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Sacrifice and Salvation: Albinism in ...
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
13 Jul 2014

“I was pretending to be asleep, but I saw them cutting her throat and drinking her blood, and then cutting her arms and legs…” These are the words of Mmindi, recalling the night in December 2008 when her 5-year-old sister, Mariam, was murdered in front of her.

Mariam had albinism. In the inner regions of Sub-Saharian Africa people with albinism have a very hard life. Not only do they need to fight against the cancer-causing rays of the harsh tropical sun, but they must also fight stigma and discrimination. Myths and stigmas about Albinos sometimes have horrific results. For examlpe, in recent years, traditional medicine has furthered the belief that albino body parts have elements with magical powers that give success and fortune. This myth has resulted in brutal killings of albinos with the aim of harvesting their body parts. Mariam was a victim of such an attack.

Another major struggle for albinos is protecting themselves from the sun. Those living in areas with little access to health care also struggle to protect themselves from the sun and treat problems arising from UV exposure. 

From the Lake Victoria region, where killings and discrimination still infringe upon these people's human rights, to the Iringa region tormented with an absence of healthcare, albinos in Tanzania are increasingly at risk as of late. The lack of proper information about albinism, in a country in which 1 out of 2.000 people is albino (in Europe and North America the ratio is 1 out of 20.000), leaves the doors to discrimination wide open. For these people, the Tanzanian government has never been able to guarantee health, education or security. Only through the help of N.G.O.s like Under The Same Sun and Tulime does a bright future seem possible for the albinos.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Albinism in Tanzania 08
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
10 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 10, 2014 - Before a race during sports day in Lake View School, Mwanza, Tanzania. albinos play sports early in the morning to avoid exposure to the hot sun.

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Football World Cup at the GACC Hospit...
So Jos dos Campos
By Flavio Forner
08 Jul 2014

A children’s leukemia ward in San Jose has turned itself into a World Cup haven with high-resolution screens, flags, and fan memorabilia.

The GACC (Grupo de Apoio Criança com Câncer) hospital invited the children and their parents to receive treatment during the Brazil games. The party atmosphere is helpful for the children and can put them at ease, as nurse Paula Oliveira says “Chemotherapy is a day on which the children suffer. They are afraid, during the six hours of treatment. We try and make the experience as normal and as happy as possible.”

During the game between Brazil and Comlumbia, six children between the ages of 3 and 9 wearing Brazil kits and wigs played happily and watched on with their parents as the host nation battled its way to a 2-1 victory.

“Viva Brazil” shouted Monica and Paula when Brazil’s first goal went in. “It’s a goal, it’s a goal, it’s a goal for Brazil!” joined in Guilherme and Ana. This kind of positivity is a vital part of the treatment, and can have effects as important as medicine.

Ana’s mother Emily Souza, 20, said, “The players are an inspiration to them, and the children are our inspiration.”

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Albinism in Tanzania 04
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 05
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 06
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

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Albinism in Tanzania 09
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Masalu, 18 years old is both deaf and mute. She arrived with her two siblings at the Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania, after the last killing of an albino that took place in May 2014. She became pregnant after being raped. The center was the immediate answer by the government to the killings of albinos that started in 2007 in the lake area. Nowadays around 200 people of all ages are living in this center together.

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Albinism in Tanzania 10
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - A child dozes off in Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania. The center is defined as a school, but it hosts 200 people of all ages assisted by two teachers and living in precarious conditions.

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Albinism in Tanzania 01
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Courtyard of Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania. The center was the immediate answer of the government to the killings of albinos that started in 2007 in the lake area. Nowadays around 200 people of all ages are living in this center together.

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Bloodletting in Old Delhi
By Sinha Archit
03 Jun 2014

Despite medical science not believing in bloodletting, lot of people from local and rest of the world come to Mohammad Iqbal for the treatment in Old Delhi .He claims to be the only bloodletting therapist in the world .He charges a very low fee and to few poor patients he performs bloodletting for free.

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Bloodletting Treatment in Delhi
New Delhi
By Rajan Zaveri
26 May 2014

Bloodletting practitioner Mohammad Gyas watched as his son sliced open the tourniquet-bound hands and feet of the sick with single-use razor blades in the garden of Old Delhi's Jama Masjid.

The ‘bad blood’ spilled into gutters that ran along the side of the platform, washed from the patient’s limbs with jugs of water. This ancient medical practice is said to cure everything from heart pain and arthritis, to cancer and diabetes.

"The darker the blood, the longer you have to bleed," Gyas said. A typical treatment regime runs for six weeks.

Gyas’ son was working with half a dozen assistants. They wrapped the tourniquets and washed water over the blade wounds to flush out blood. They then treated the cuts with a mixture of spices and doctor was on hand to give tetanus injections.

Gyas learned the trade from his grandfather and passed on his skills to his son. He has been practicing and overseeing treatments at the same place every day since 1980. During that time he has saved every single razor blade he used, which he proudly displays in 20 plastic drums.

“This many years, this many people, this many blades,” he said, pointing proudly to the plastic drums. “How could you doubt my treatment working?”

Gyas suffers from Parkinson’s disease, which has prevented him from doing any of the work himself since 2008. Interestingly, neither he nor his son sported any nicks or cuts on their own limbs. However, that does not deter the duo's patients who travel from far-flung parts of India and even other countries, including Japan and the United States. Many of them swear by the treatment, which includes following a strict no-booze, no-smoking, legume-rich diet.

One of Gyas' longtime arthritis patients demonstrated his belief in the treatment by leaping spiritedly on and off a brick platform in the garden.

“Look at me now!” he exclaimed in broken English, grinning and bouncing gratefully. “I can move everything, there’s no pain.”

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Tin Fever in Indonesia 33
By Steven Wassenaar
17 Mar 2014

Fondy (51 years) is a contracter working for PT Timah, his mine produces 60 tons of tin a month. He hopes to be able to produce 80-100 tons next year. The Pemali mine, the biggest legal mine in Bangka that has completely devastated the once green landscape. Operated by PT-Timah, it produces 60 tons of tin per month. Bangka Island (Indonesia) is devastated by illegal tin mines. The demand for tin has increased due to its use in smart phones and tablets.

Fondy (51 ans) est un sous-traitant, travaillant pour PT Timah, sa mine produit 60 tonnes d'étain par mois, il espère atteindre 80-100 tonnes l'année prochaine. Mine de Pemali, plus grande mine légale de Bangka. Exploité par PT-Timah. Elle produit 60 tonnes d'étain par mois. L'île de Bangka (Indonésie) est dévastée par des mines d'étain. La demande de l'étain a explosé à cause de son utilisation dans les smartphones et tablettes.

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Children's Resilience in Aleppo 2
Aleppo, Syria
By Walid Al Ahmad
01 Oct 2013

Aleppo- Syria, October 1, 2013: Heba Basmage, a 9 year-old diagnosed with cancer, was being treated before the revolution, but now does not have access to a hospital to continue her therapy. She insisted to continue her education.

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No Tobacco Day In Pakistan
Karachi, Pakistan
By U.S. Editor
31 May 2013

Each year May 31 is observed as World No Tobacco Day (WNTD), with the aim to spread awareness about the pitfalls of tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has faced to date. May 31, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Almost 2,500 people die in Pakistan daily due to consumption of tobacco and smoking. Many people suffer from asthma and bronchitis, in addition to the more severe cases of cancer and heart attacks.

Tobacco use is rising in Pakistan, with about 30.7 percent of men estimated to be smokers, Pakistan stands at the brink of a devastating health and economic disaster. The steep rise in the use of tobacco amongst youth, especially young girls and women, is depriving the country of a healthy workforce, while increasing the burden of disease on an already overburdened health sector.

The fact that approximately 1,200 children start smoking daily represents a huge health and economic disaster.

Individuals who smoke cigarettes are 12 times more likely to die from lung cancer, two to four times more likely to develop coronary heart disease, twice as likely to have a stroke, and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive lung disease.

Although many people are aware of the health issues associated with smoking, they are unable to quit due to nicotine addiction. However, willpower and personal determination to break free from the addiction play the most crucial role.

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No Tobacco Day in Pakistan (4 of 6)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
31 May 2013

Each year May 31 is observed as World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) with the aim to spread awareness about the ills of tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. May 31, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Almost 2,500 people die in Pakistan daily due to consumption of tobacco and smoking. Many people suffer from asthma and bronchitis, in addition to than cancer and heart attacks.

Tobacco use is rising in Pakistan, with about 30.7 per cent of men estimated to be smokers, Pakistan stands at the brink of a devastating health and economic disaster. The steep rise in the use of tobacco amongst the youth, especially young girls and women is depriving the country of a healthy workforce while increasing the burden of disease on an already overburdened health sector.
The fact that approximately 1,200 children start smoking daily represents a huge health and economic impact.
Individuals who smoke cigarettes are 12 times more likely to die from lung cancer, two to four times more likely to develop coronary heart disease, twice as likely to have a stroke, and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive lung disease.
Although many people are aware of health issues involved in smoking, they are unable to quit due to nicotine addiction. However, willpower and personal determination to break free from the addiction play the most crucial role.

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No Tobacco Day in Pakistan (3 of 6)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
31 May 2013

Each year May 31 is observed as World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) with the aim to spread awareness about the ills of tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. May 31, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Almost 2,500 people die in Pakistan daily due to consumption of tobacco and smoking. Many people suffer from asthma and bronchitis, in addition to than cancer and heart attacks.

Tobacco use is rising in Pakistan, with about 30.7 per cent of men estimated to be smokers, Pakistan stands at the brink of a devastating health and economic disaster. The steep rise in the use of tobacco amongst the youth, especially young girls and women is depriving the country of a healthy workforce while increasing the burden of disease on an already overburdened health sector.
The fact that approximately 1,200 children start smoking daily represents a huge health and economic impact.
Individuals who smoke cigarettes are 12 times more likely to die from lung cancer, two to four times more likely to develop coronary heart disease, twice as likely to have a stroke, and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive lung disease.
Although many people are aware of health issues involved in smoking, they are unable to quit due to nicotine addiction. However, willpower and personal determination to break free from the addiction play the most crucial role.

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No Tobacco Day in Pakistan (2 of 6)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
31 May 2013

Each year May 31 is observed as World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) with the aim to spread awareness about the ills of tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. May 31, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Almost 2,500 people die in Pakistan daily due to consumption of tobacco and smoking. Many people suffer from asthma and bronchitis, in addition to than cancer and heart attacks.

Tobacco use is rising in Pakistan, with about 30.7 per cent of men estimated to be smokers, Pakistan stands at the brink of a devastating health and economic disaster. The steep rise in the use of tobacco amongst the youth, especially young girls and women is depriving the country of a healthy workforce while increasing the burden of disease on an already overburdened health sector.
The fact that approximately 1,200 children start smoking daily represents a huge health and economic impact.
Individuals who smoke cigarettes are 12 times more likely to die from lung cancer, two to four times more likely to develop coronary heart disease, twice as likely to have a stroke, and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive lung disease.
Although many people are aware of health issues involved in smoking, they are unable to quit due to nicotine addiction. However, willpower and personal determination to break free from the addiction play the most crucial role.

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No Tobacco Day in Pakistan (1 of 6)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
31 May 2013

Each year May 31 is observed as World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) with the aim to spread awareness about the ills of tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. May 31, 2013, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

Almost 2,500 people die in Pakistan daily due to consumption of tobacco and smoking. Many people suffer from asthma and bronchitis, in addition to than cancer and heart attacks.

Tobacco use is rising in Pakistan, with about 30.7 per cent of men estimated to be smokers, Pakistan stands at the brink of a devastating health and economic disaster. The steep rise in the use of tobacco amongst the youth, especially young girls and women is depriving the country of a healthy workforce while increasing the burden of disease on an already overburdened health sector.
The fact that approximately 1,200 children start smoking daily represents a huge health and economic impact.
Individuals who smoke cigarettes are 12 times more likely to die from lung cancer, two to four times more likely to develop coronary heart disease, twice as likely to have a stroke, and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive lung disease.
Although many people are aware of health issues involved in smoking, they are unable to quit due to nicotine addiction. However, willpower and personal determination to break free from the addiction play the most crucial role.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
28 Mar 2013

Aram Karim Hama Hussein (boy) and Ana Karim Hama Hussein (girl) age 4. They are both born with Microcephalus, a neurodevelopmental disorder in which the circumference of the head is more than two standard deviations smaller than average for the person's age and sex, and can be caused by abnormal conditions while the mother is pregnant. Both children are unable to walk or develop speaking abilities.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
27 Mar 2013

The wife of Mr Ali Mahmoud Muhammad Empties their collection fo empty med-boxes on a carpet

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
27 Mar 2013

8 year old aunt of Aram Karim Hama Hussein and Ana Karim Hama Hussein.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
27 Mar 2013

Sheena Fathalla with help in her mother's arms. She was born blind (24 Feb 2010) She was immediatly diagnosed Hydrocephalus, a medical condition in which there is an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the ventricles, or cavities, of the brain, causing increased pressure inside the skull. She's unable to walk, but she might be able to have surgery at the age of 14.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
27 Mar 2013

Nermin Hama, Hamin Masoon, Sartak Hama Nazim Sardas Fathallago go back to the bomb shelter where they hid in 1988 during the attack. People who survived managed to stay in bomb shelters all day and afterwards had to flee to Iran as the city was no longer safe to live in.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
25 Mar 2013

Arish Aziz Ali (boy) was born with a congenital malformation of the right foot. He can walk, however the right leg is shorter than the other.
Jian Aziz Ali, 25. She was born the day of the attack on 16 March 1988. She studies Sport Education at the Halabja University and plays volleyball in the Halabja city team.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
25 Mar 2013

The medication boxes of Ali Mahmoud Muhammad affected by Pulmonary Fibrosis since 1988. According to a medical source anyone who survived the attack and lived after it had either pulmunary fibrosis, skin conditions and asthma.

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
23 Mar 2013

Mr. Sarxel. President of The Memorial of the Halabja Gas attack that occured on 16/3/1988

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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Farm to Fork (Part 1 of 3)
Kathmandu, Nepal
By PIKTO VIDEO
14 Mar 2013

It is strange to observe that despite the sacred statute of food in Nepal, it is paradoxically the origin of many diseases sometimes leading to death. We know that millions of people don’t have enough to eat, and that some of them even face severe conditions of malnutrition. Of all facts, food security remains a major problem in Nepal. But what we know less is that 50% of the diseases come from a misuse of food and water. This alarming figure is more than ever a topical issue. In order to find answers and solutions, we investigated the backstage of food, from where it is produced – the farm – to our final consumption – the fork!

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Farm to fork part 3/3
kathmandu, Nepal
By PIKTO VIDEO
14 Mar 2013

It is strange to observe that despite the sacred statute of food in Nepal, it is paradoxically the origin of many diseases sometimes leading to death. We know that millions of people don’t have enough to eat, and that some of them even face severe conditions of malnutrition. Of all facts, food security remains a major problem in Nepal. But what we know less is that 50% of the diseases come from a misuse of food and water. This alarming figure is more than ever a topical issue. In order to find answers and solutions, we investigated the backstage of food, from where it is produced – the farm – to our final consumption – the fork!

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Farm to fork part 2/3
kathmandu, Nepal
By PIKTO VIDEO
13 Mar 2013

It is strange to observe that despite the sacred statute of food in Nepal, it is paradoxically the origin of many diseases sometimes leading to death. We know that millions of people don’t have enough to eat, and that some of them even face severe conditions of malnutrition. Of all facts, food security remains a major problem in Nepal. But what we know less is that 50% of the diseases come from a misuse of food and water. This alarming figure is more than ever a topical issue. In order to find answers and solutions, we investigated the backstage of food, from where it is produced – the farm – to our final consumption – the fork!

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The Death of a Village
Karnataka, India
By Javed Iqbal
10 Mar 2013

The village, predominately populated by Lambadas (Banjara tribe) that was irrigated due to the Upper Krishna Project, bears an abandoned look, owing to migration and the large number of cancer cases.

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The Vengeful Ghosts Of A Gold Mine
Karnataka, India
By Javed Iqbal
08 Mar 2013

Sudhram holds a photo of his wife Rukhmani Bai, who suffered and died from cancer in 2012 at the age 38. He had to sell over five acres of his land to upper-caste farmers to pay for her hospital bills. Today, he himself has the similar lesions that led to his wife's death.

He laughed when I asked him if he was afraid of death.

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25th Anniversary Of Halabja
Halabja, Iraq
By U.S. Editor
05 Mar 2013

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food. The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
04 Mar 2013

Neighborhoods around the memorial of the attack on the city

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
01 Mar 2013

HALABJA 1988-2013

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.

Amhed Baker's hands. He was in Halabja the day of the attack, when the gas cleared out he helped around the city. Most of his body is affected by a skin condition. This is very common among the survivors.

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25th Anniversary of the gas attack on...
Halabja, Iraq
By Antonio Zambardino
01 Mar 2013

Relative of Mr. Baker. Praying in the kitchen.
HALABJA 1988-2013

On the 16th of March 1988, an Iraqi military strike hit the Kurdish town of Halabja with the greatest attack of chemical weapons ever used against a civilian population. The weapons used were a "cocktail" of mustard gas and the nerve agents sarin, tabun and VX. These chemicals drenched the skin and clothes of the targeted people, affected their respiratory tracts and eyes and contaminated their water and food.
But a generation later, the strike on Halabja is still killing people. An increasing number of children are dying each year of leukemia and lymphomas. The cancers are more frequent in children and teenagers in Halabja than elsewhere in Iraqi Kurdistan, and many people have aggressive tumors.
No chemotherapy or radiotherapy is available in this region. The attack has left thousands people wounded physiologically too. Some statues and monument in Halabja are based on the pictures taken on the day of the attack and often show dying people instead of triumphant men in a context of greatness.
The entire city carries this legacy on its shoulders.