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"Solidarity for All" Aids Immigrant W...
Nea Manolada, Elis, Greece
By Kostis Ntantamis
19 Jul 2014

Immigrants, most of them from Bangladesh, work as strawberry pickers in the fields of Nea Manolada, one of the main areas of strawberry cultivation in Greece. The working and living conditions are shocking. They are forced to work from dusk till dawn, with little or no money and no health care and insurance. More than 20 people live together in structures made of plastic sheets; they lack even basic sanitation and have only a hose for running water.

On Sunday 20 July, 2014 the organization "Solidarity for All" organized a visit to their camp in order to supply food and medicine and do health checks and provide aid where needed.

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Gezi Gets Gassed -Black and White- (8...
Istanbul, Turkey
By umutvedat
19 Jun 2013

A man tried to help people who were intoxicated by tear gas during an attack in Gezi Park. Demonstrations took place beside Taksim Square as citizens protested against the government after a mall project that would take the place of Gezi Park was established. The protests were initially peaceful but ongoing violence has been taking place for over three weeks and continues to escalate in Istanbul, Turkey. June 2013.

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VOLUNTEERS HELP VICTIMS OF TORNADO-ST...
Moore, Oklahoma
By Daniela Gallardo
22 May 2013

On May 20 a powerful tornado struck the city of Moore, a suburb just south of Oklahoma City, with a population of 55,000. The tragic event left a death toll of 24, including 9 children, and around 300 injured. The twister was one of the largest and strongest that has ever hit the area, leaving thousands of residents without homes and without their most precious belongings. In the interview below, a victim talks about how he feels after the total loss of his home and goods which he worked so hard to obtain.You will also find interviews with three young volunteers (one local and two from out of state) that were helping victims to recover their valuables and offering all type of support.

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VOLUNTEERS HELP VICTIMS OF TORNADO-ST...
Moore, Oklahoma
By Daniela Gallardo
22 May 2013

On May 20 a powerful tornado struck the city of Moore, a suburb just south of Oklahoma City, with a population of 55,000. The tragic event took away the life of 24, including 9 children, and left around 300 injured. The twister was one of the largest and strongest that has ever hit the area, leaving thousands of residents without homes and without their most precious belongings. In the interview below, a victim talks about how he is getting through this difficult experience and how he feels after the total loss of his home and goods which he worked so hard to obtain. Also, you can find three interviews with young volunteers (one local and two from out of state) to help victims recover their valuables and provide them with all type of help and support.

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Volunteers Help Victims Of Oklahoma T...
Moore, Oklahoma
By U.S. Editor
22 May 2013

On May 20th a powerful tornado struck the city of Moore, a suburb just south of Oklahoma City with a population of 55,000. The tragic event left 24 dead, among them 9 children, and around 300 injured. The twister was one of the largest and strongest that has ever hit the area, leaving thousands of residents homeless. In the interview below, a victim discusses how he feels after the total loss of his home and belongings which he worked so hard to obtain. There are also interviews with three young volunteers (one local and two from out of state) who are helping victims recover their valuables.

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Local Lebanese Child
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

Local children and refugees live and work together in the Bekaa Valley, Lebanon.

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The Rise Of The Anonymous (12 of 13)
Tehran, Iran
By Hanif
09 Feb 2013

6 January 2013 –Activists of Toloo cook foods which will be distributed among homeless people.

"The Rise Of The Anonymous" institute includes more than 3000 members which every week between 100-150 members activate in it and about 2000 warm meals are distributed by this institute to homelesses every week.

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The Rise Of The Anonymous
Tehran, Iran
By U.S. Editor
08 Feb 2013

"Toloo Institute" in Persian means "The Rise Of The Anonymous" is the name of a charity organization. Every week its members salute the homeless people of south Tehran with warm home made meals, chat with them and introduce them to this institution. People who suffer from addiction are treated in the rehabilitation centers with the institute's sponsorship and for the ones that have nowhere to live, they provide shelter. Some of those who take part in these events were once suffering from the same complications however, they have now overcome those hardships with the aid of this institution and are now trying to help in kind.

Some, though not all, of Iran's homeless are addicted to hashish which they smoke in water pipes (nargileh). The homeless are supported by an organization that is also made up of young men and women that cook for them and then distribute the food. They offer advice and counseling to the drug addicts.

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To The Ambulance
Alansari, Aleppo, Syria
By ward.furati
29 Nov 2012

The men crowd around to help get the survivor onto the ambulance to get medical aid. The man was injured after the bombing of the Alansari neighborhood of Aleppo on the morning of November 29, 2012

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Protest in Hozano, Syria
Hozano, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Hozano, Syria

Speaking out, the people protest against president Assad after Friday prayer in Hozano.

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Protest in Hozano, Syria
Hozano, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Hozano, Syria

Speaking out, the people protest against president Assad after Friday prayer in Hozano.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Taliba...
Swat Valley, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
08 Mar 2012

Gul-e-Khandana, the school's head teacher, helped save the girls from the Taliban at the school where she taught. She oversees the morning assembly with her students.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Talib...
Swat Valley, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
07 Mar 2012

Gul-e-Khandana, a school teacher, helped save the girls school she taught in from the destruction of the Taliban. During their short rule in the Swat Valley, the Taliban attempted to burn the school down. Gul-e- Khandana is now the head teacher in the same school after peace was restored in the area.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Taliba...
Swat Valley, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
07 Mar 2012

A girl prays during the morning school assembly in a small village called Sijban, deep in the Swat Valley. Gul Khandana, a school teacher, helped save the school from the destruction during the Taliban's short rule, during which they attempted to burn it down.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Taliba...
Swat Valley, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
07 Mar 2012

Headmistress Gul Khandana prays with her students during the morning assembly in Sijban, a village deep in the Swat Valley. The village and school were threatened by violence from the Taliban during their short rule.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Talib...
Swat Valley, Pakistan
By Muhammed Furqan
07 Mar 2012

Head teacher, Gul Khandana oversees the morning assembly with her students. The Taliban threatened to burn the school down during their short rule.
Swat Valley, Pakistan.

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A Story of Courage, Saved from Taliba...
Swat Valley, Pakistan
By U.S. Editor
15 Feb 2011

School teacher Gul Khandera’s stubborn resistance to the Taliban has made her a heroine in her hometown of Siljbon, and a voice for girls' education rights in Pakistan. The school where Gul Khandera was teaching, which also happens to be the school where Gul herself was educated, was threatened by the Taliban because it had female students.
Gul Khandera's refusal to comply with the Taliban's demands made her a personal target, forcing her to move to Mardan. When the Taliban were ousted from Swat, Gul returned and was relieved to see that her school had not been destroyed. Now a considered a hero, Gul has become headmaster of the school and is working to re-establish education for girls in the Swat Valley.

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Cyno's goat
Kampala, Uganda
By Amy Hume
08 Jan 2011

Upon winning 100 USD in the MC Challenge, Cyno MC used the money to buy a goat so that he could share his wealth. He wanted his friends to have a full stomach.

Here, Foever MC and friends enjoy fresh meat.

Hip Hop is a global phenomena that reaches nearly all corners of the Earth. Starting in the projects of NYC nearly 40 years ago, struggling youth from Mongolia to Rwanda use music as a weapon to express their situations, hopes, and dreams. Though Hip Hop culture is new to Uganda, it is becoming popular with people of all ages, but with the youth in particular. Hip Hop music is reaching the smallest of villages, as I witnessed in the war-torn area of Gulu. Access to music is free, which is an essential aspect of why Hip Hop is spreading like wildfire.
In 2009, End of the Weak (EOW), a collaboration of MCs, graffiti artists, break dancers and DJs that spans 17 countries, reached Uganda. All chapters of EOW are involved with community outreach, workshops for youth and exude positive influence in their communities through Hip Hop culture. The MC Challenge is a competition in each country wherein the winners gather at the World Finals, which are held in a different country each year. The MC Challenge is held in the central, eastern, western and northern regions of Uganda so that many different languages are represented in the competition. Winners of the MC Challenge are provided studio time, video production and photo shoots as a way to share and promote their music.

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X Addicts
Oxford, UK
By Kirk Ellingham
01 Aug 2010

The Ley Community is a drug rehabilitation centre in Yarnton, Oxfordshire.
They help men and women build new lives after addiction to drugs and alcohol.

I grew up in and around the south London area. At the age of 16 I started smoking crack cocaine and getting more into crime. I was hanging around with people a lot older than me, in big groups fighting a lot and committing a lot of crime, getting into a lot of trouble. Back then it was all about who was the maddest and who was the baddest.

I grew up around a lot of drugs and violence and back then I thought that was what it was all about, being the big hard man. This led me to spend a lot of my life in prison from the age of 16. When I was out there involved in all the madness I didn't care about anyone or anything, I was a mess. Through all this my partner, who I met when I was 16, stuck by me. I was being very violent, drinking too much all the time.

When I was 20 my son was born and I was in prison at the time and that hurt me but it was down to my own stupidity. I came out and tried to stay off drugs but I couldn't do it and in the end my partner left me and took my son and I went off and ended up in prison on a robbery charge looking at a few years locked up again. I'd just had enough of the lifestyle, the drugs and spending all my life locked up. I spoke to a drugs worker in the prison and they said what about a rehab. I thought I would give it a go. I went to court and the judge sent me here.

Coming to the Ley was strange after spending so much time in prison and putting on the hard man act all that time. Everyone here was so nice to me, kind, caring and helpful. I've been here a while and I'm getting used to things and learning a lot about myself, the real me. When you look at the people at the end of the programme you see the benefits and if you put in the work you will get there. I'm rebuilding my relationship with my partner of seven years who has never used drugs and my son who is three years old now.

Now I'm looking forward to the future and being a good father and having a good life, a clean life. I know here I will learn what I need to live that life, I'm done with my old life, I now see it was nothing but crap but I now know my future will be good. My family and people that know me and even I can see a change in me and it's a good change. I would say to anyone that really wants to sort their life out that this is the place.

At times it is not easy but it’s what we need. My future is now about getting a job and a nice little place to live, once I have done this programme, and being a proper family with my partner and my son and living a drug and crime free life. Just being happy and grateful for the things I've got and being a good father and to make sure my son doesn't go down the road I did. I grew up without my father but I'm now getting my life back and my son will grow up with his father there for him and I'm really happy I've got this chance to get my life together.