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Asylum Seekers in Spain 17
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 May 2015

'Fodoy' listens music in his bedroom at the apartment that he shares with other three migrants from Gambia and Kenya in Sabadell, Spain. 'Fodoy' is a nickname for a migrant from Gambia, who arrived to Barcelona in 2007 without residence permit. He fled the country due to political prosecution and departed in a boat to Canary Islands. Then, the Spanish authorities reallocated him to Valencia and then to Barcelona. His asylum request has been blocked until 2017 due to having been condemned for drugs dealing. Until then, he is struggling to find accommodation and to have income to survive, although organizations such as CCAR assist him from time to time.

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Nepal portfolio final 18
Bhaktapur
By Taylor Weidman
02 May 2015

Nepali women react to a call from their neighbor as they work to clear rubble from their home in Bhaktapur, Nepal on May 2, 2015. On April 25, 2015, Nepal suffered a magnitude 7.8 earthquake killing over 6,000 people and injuring thousands more.

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Nepal portfolio final 19
Bhaktapur
By Taylor Weidman
02 May 2015

Nepali residents sift through rubble to recover keys, coins, and other small items from the rubble of their home in Bhaktapur, Nepal on May 2, 2015. On April 25, 2015, Nepal suffered a magnitude 7.8 earthquake killing over 6,000 people and injuring thousands more.

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Land Day R
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
30 Mar 2015

As the Land Day action is brought to an abrupt halt in Wadi Fukin, the majority of the 350 olive tree saplings remain unplanted outside a house in the village after activists were forced to escape from clouds of tear gas that was fired by Israeli soldiers.
Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
30 Mar 2015

A Palestinian child watches from a rooftop in Wadi Fukin as Israeli soldiers fire rounds of tear gas at fleeing activists during a tree planting event to mark Land Day. In the background stands the huge Israeli settlement of Beitar Illit which is built partly on the land of Wadi Fukin.
Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 19
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
30 Mar 2015

Two elderly Palestinian women attempt to make their way down the hill in Wadi Fukin to escape from the tear gas that is being fired by Israeli forces.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 20
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
30 Mar 2015

An Israeli security helicopter circles above Wadi Fukin during the olive tree planting event to commemorate Palestinian Land Day on March 30th 2015.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 21
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
30 Mar 2015

Israeli soldiers line up on a hill top in Wadi Fukin as Palestinian activists watch from a distance during an olive tree planting event to commemorate Land Day in the Palestinian village of Wadi Fukin.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 4
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

350 olive trees were brought to Wadi Fukin to be planted on the lands threatened by settlement expansion.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine, March 30 2105.

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Land Day 5
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

Activists make their way up a hill toward land that is threatened by the expansion of the Sur Haddasah settlement. In the background, the huge Beitar Illit settlement is also built on the land of Wadi Fukin.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine, March 30 2015.

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Land Day 6
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

In the West Bank village of Wadi Fukin, an olive tree planting event is underway with local activists and refugees from Bethlehem's refugee camps to commemorate Land Day on March 30th 2015.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 18
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

Activists flee as Israeli forces rain tear gas down on them. The tear gas stopped the olive tree planting event being held to commemorate Land Day in the Palestinian village of Wadi Fukin.
Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 1
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

A Palestinian youth raises a Palestinian flag from the top of settlement construction machinery within the construction site that is expanding the Israeli settlement of Sur Hadassah. Sur Hadassah is located on the land of the West Bank Palestinian village of Wadi Fukin and the land of the pre-Nakba Palestinian village of Ras Abu Ammar.

Wadi Fukin/Ras Abu Ammar, West Bank/Green Line, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 2
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

A small group of activists reach the construction site on the top of the hill in which Sur Hadassah settlement is being further expanded.

Wadi Fukin/Ras Abu Ammar, West Bank/Green Line, Palestinel. March 30 2015.

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Land Day 3
Wadi Fukin
By Rich Wiles
29 Mar 2015

An elderly Palestinian women plants an olive tree sapling on land of the village of Wadi Fukin, which is threatened with confiscation by the expansion of the Sur Hadassah Jewish settlement.

Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine. March 30 2015.

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Land Day
Lifta
By Rich Wiles
27 Mar 2015

Yakoub Odeh is one of Lifta's Nakba survivors and also the head of 'Sons of Lifta' - a community group that was established by the refugees in defense of their village and their right to return to live in the village: "We are here to remember, we are here to learn and we are here to say we will never give up (our struggle for return)." Yakoub Odeh and Palestinian refugees from Lifta. Lifta, West Jerusalem, Israel. March 27 2015.

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Land Day 7
Lifta
By Rich Wiles
26 Mar 2015

The refugees ended their Land Day action with Friday prayers at the edge of Lifta's spring under the watchful eyes of Israeli security forces and Jewish orthodox youth from the nearby settlements.

Palestinian refugees from Lifta. Lifta, West Jerusalem, Israel. March 27 2015.

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Land Day 8
Lifta
By Rich Wiles
26 Mar 2015

A Jewish youth from a nearby settlement talks to Palestinians commemorating land day in the village of Lifta.

Although the village centre of Lifta and its houses remain unoccupied, large areas of the village's wider lands were expropriated for settlement expansion. Orthodox youth from these settlements regularly visit Lifta to bath in its spring

Palestinian refugees and Jewish orthodox youth, Lifta, West Jerusalem, March 27 2015.

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Land Day 9
Lifta
By Rich Wiles
26 Mar 2015

Lifta's mosque is also still standing today and offers sweeping views across the western slopes of the village from its arched windows.

Palestinian refugees from Lifta. Lifta, West Jerusalem, Israel, March 27 2015.

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Land Day 10
Lifta
By Rich Wiles
26 Mar 2015

Cleaning and restoration work in the village cemetery has become a focal point for many events held by the community-in-exile when they visit Lifta. The refugees' ancestors remain buried at the site to this day. There are now estimated to be more than 7 million Palestinian refugees and displaced people.

Palestinian refugees from Lifta. Lifta, West Jerusalem, Israel. March 27 2015.

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Land Day 11
Lifta
By Rich Wiles
26 Mar 2015

Nader Liftawi was born a refugee in the Sheikh Jarrah neighbourhood of East Jerusalem in 1970 and was brought to the village regularly by his father from an early age.

"I have brought my children here since they were young. I come at least once every month to check the houses, clean the graves and smell the air. This is everything to us," explained Nader.

Nader Liftawi, Palestinian refugee form Lifta. Lifta, West Jerusalem, Israel. March 27 2015.

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Land Day 13
Lifta
By Rich Wiles
26 Mar 2015

Lifta was forcibly depopulated in early 1948 by Zionist militias, well before the official establishment of the State of Israel. Some Nakba survivors say that they were told to leave temporarily and would later be allowed to return.

Palestinian refugees from Lifta. Lifta, West Jerusalem, Israel. March 27 2015.

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Land Day 14
Lifta
By Rich Wiles
26 Mar 2015

Yakoub Odeh is one of Lifta's Nakba survivors and also the head of 'Sons of Lifta' - a community group that was established by the refugees in defense of their village and their right to return to live in the village: "We are here to remember, we are here to learn and we are here to say we will never give up (our struggle for return)."

Yakoub Odeh and Palestinian refugees from Lifta. Lifta, West Jerusalem, Israel. March 27 2015.

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Land Day 15
Lifta
By Rich Wiles
26 Mar 2015

Lifta is unique amongst the Palestinian villages that were depopulated during the Nakba in that the majority of its houses remain structurally intact and are not occupied by Israelis today.

Palestinian refugees from Lifta. Lifta, West Jerusalem, Israel. March 27 2015.

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Land Day 22
Lifta
By Rich Wiles
26 Mar 2015

The refugees hung signs in various locations around Lifta reaffirming the history and Palestinian identity of the village.
Palestinian refugees from Lifta, Lifta, West Jerusalem, Israel. March 27 2015.

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Land Day 16
Lifta
By Rich Wiles
26 Mar 2015

After a journet of only 10 minutes the refugees arrived back in the village from which they were forcibly displaced in early 1948 by Zionist militias.
Palestinian refugees from Lifta, Lifta, West Jerusalem, Israel. March 27 2015.

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Land Day 17
East Jerusalem
By Rich Wiles
26 Mar 2015

Palestinian refugees boarded buses in the East Jerusaelm neighbourhood of French Hill to make the short journey across the Green Line to their home village of Lifta to commemorate Land Day.

Palestinian refugees from Lifta, March 27 2015, French Hill, East Jerusalem, Palestine.

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ISIS Destroys Home of Mosul's Prison ...
Mosul
By omariq
05 Mar 2015

March 2015
Mosul, Iraq

Video shows what eyewitnesses claim to be ISIS destroying the personal residence of the former warden of Mosul Prison, General Khalaf al-Jabouri.

The prison had been used by the Iraqi government to detain suspected terrorists. Locals say that many of the inmates have now become members of ISIS.

General Jabouri fled his home in the Shura district of Mosul in June 2014 when ISIS militants seized control of Iraq's second largest city.

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Together in Kobane: Former Refugee Re...
Kobane
By Bedir
10 Feb 2015

Kobani, Syria
February 10, 2015

After leaving her hometown of Kobani and living in Turkey for several months, Siddiqa Barkal was happily reunited with her husband and two sons who remained in the city to fight against ISIS. Siddiqa’s three daughters and her youngest son were also rejoiced to return with her.
Siddiqa’s husband, Ismat Sheikh Hassan, is the head of the Defense Committee in the Kobani Canton, part of the autonomous district proclaimed by the Kurdish Democratic Union Party, known by the Kurdish acronym PYD. He was widely quoted by Western media during the battle for Kobani.
Siddiqa says that she was very sad to leave her hometown and live in exile, despite the warm welcome she received in Turkey. She took the risk of returning to Kobani even before ISIS fighters were defeated because her young children could not bear living outside their city.
In Kobani, Siddiqa stood by her husband, sons and other fighters of the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) during the battles and made them food until they won over the battle against ISIS.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of family in living room

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Woman) Siddiqa Barkal, Refugee Who Returned to Kobani

01:01 - 09:45

“We left when ISIS attacked Kobani on [September] 20. We did not leave willingly. We wanted to stay in Kobani and live with the comrades and fighters. We wanted to be martyred with them. Seven days after I left Kobani with my children, they convinced me of returning. We returned but could not enter. My children and I stayed in Suruc. They did not tolerate to live outside Kobani. They kept saying that they wanted to return. I had three girls and a young boy with me. Even though my children could not live outside of Kobani, the situation there did not allow us to return. The father of my children and two of my children were fighting in the city. The rest of my children and I were very worried about them. My young son Hamza used to cry and say, ‘I cannot stand living outside Kobani because my friends are not here. I feel lonely when I am outside my city.’ In Suruc, my children and I were living in a house. My children never left the house during the day. On certain days, they used to sleep during the day and stay up at night watching television. On the 25th of the month, my older daughter went to Kobani. She called me, saying, ‘I cannot take it anymore. My father and two brothers are in Kobani and I need to go and see them. I want to stay in my city, Kobani.’
“I had many friends and acquaintances in northern Turkey who offered to let me live in their homes. I went near to Kobani on several occasions. My young son and I cried as smoke was rising from the buildings. The sound of explosions and gunshots was heard. Warplanes were bombing and the city was being destroyed. We were very worried about our friends who were fighting to defend the city. One day, I decided to return to Kobani while ISIS mercenaries were still there. I called my daughter then to tell her that we were coming and she told her father. My husband called me, saying: ‘Why did you not tell us that you were coming?’ I returned to Kobani and he was very happy. Some were worried that my children would be affected by the scenes of killing and destruction. There were also worried that ISIS was still there. “I used to make dinner for the fighters on the front and help them. We never thought that ISIS could have control over us. Many people used to ask me whether Kobani will fall or not. I used to say to them that Kobani will never fall and that it shall be victorious. 'We will fight until the last drop of our blood and the last stone in the city.’ I kept saying this to the women and mothers. The ideas of leader Abdullah Ocalan were behind the victory. Male and female fighters are fighting by relying on their own capabilities and conviction. They were not pushed by anyone; they were not forced to do this. They are fighting with their hearts, which is why they will achieve victory. For example, when you make a child carry something, he will carry it but he might fail. If he carries it with his own will and strength, he will succeed. The young men and women came from all parts of Kurdistan. We consider the member of the People’s Protection Units and the Women’s Protection Units our sons and daughters and parts of our bodies. They are sacrificing their lives for their land, which is why we will achieve victory. “I cannot describe the way I felt when we returned to Kobani. We felt so much joy. My little son Hamza was thrilled because he returned to his friends. I asked my son on our way back, ‘Who do you want to see first, your brothers or your father?’ He said: ‘I want to return to my friends.’ Friendship is more important for him. When I was in Kobani, I was very happy to see the comrade fighters. I did not believe that I was actually with them, and that I was embraced by Kobani. When the comrade fighters liberated Kobani from ISIS mercenaries, I was trembling. I was so happy that I did not understand what was happening. I asked a woman near me: ‘Am I in Kobani? Has it been liberated?’ “I cannot describe the joy I felt. When I left Kobani, I felt as if one of my sons or the father of my children was martyred. We all cried when we left. Even my young son went to the comrades and held their hands, saying: ‘I want to stay in Kobani and be martyred.’ When I left Kobani, I was told that I would return in seven days. My son was fighting on the eastern front, where battles were the fiercest. I did not tell anyone that I was leaving. When my son heard about it he said: ‘Mother, why are you leaving?’ I told him that I was not leaving willingly, and that I was leaving because the comrades wanted me to. When I left, I did not bid my sons farewell. It was a very painful moment. I cannot forget that moment. The moment I crossed the border was very painful. I cannot describe it. “Now that Kobani has been liberated, people will return to the city in the next few weeks. Those whose houses were destroyed will rebuild their houses. We have to help each other, take care of ourselves and return to our previous lives. We will live a happy life. Rojava [Syrian part of Kurdistan] will be fully liberated from ISIS mercenaries, especially that they were defeated in Kobani. The People’s Protection Units and the Women’s Protection Units have pledged to fight ISIS wherever they were. We, the people, should help the members of these forces who are sacrificing their lives for the homeland.”

Various of family inside the house
Various of young Hamza
Various of family and guests in front of the house

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After the Punishment: Home Demolition...
Silwan
By Ibrahim Husseini
24 Dec 2014

In Jerusalem, the Israeli Army has been destroying the family homes of militants as a form of collective punishment. This story explores what happens to those families after they have lost their home.

Article:

Text by Youssef Zbib

In October, 21-year-old Abdel Rahman Shalodi drove his car into a light rail train station on a line that connects Israeli settlements in Jerusalem. He killed a baby and a woman from Ecuador and wounded at least seven other people. This act was part of a recent series of attacks against Israelis, fueled in part by a religious conflict over the ownership of the holy site that Israelis call the Temple Mount and to which Palestinians refer as the Noble Sanctuary.
In retaliation for the attack, the Israeli government ordered the destruction of the Shalodi family’s apartment unit, located in the Silwan neighborhood near the disputed old center of Jerusalem. His mother, father and five siblings, are now without a home.

"Right now we are living in my brother-in-law’s apartment. He is in Jordan now and will come back in five months,” said Enas Shalodi, Abdel Rahman’s 43-year-old mother.

“We can only use the living room and one bedroom in the apartment in which we are staying, so the situation is a little difficult. Some of my children sleep at their grandmother's and some sleep here," she added.

The Israeli police have not left the family alone since the demolition. Police officers interrupted a reporter’s interview with Enas to inspect the apartment, something which has happened repeatedly since the family moved into their temporary residence.
“They came here when we moved in and said that we are not allowed to stay. [They show up whenever] a reporter comes here,”Enas said while her teenage daughter Nebras spoke with the police officers.

“The [Israeli police] are also threatening to demolish the home where we are staying now, which belongs to my brother-in-law (…) Since the demolition, approximately 34 days ago, they broke in here about 10 times,” Enas said.

Enas’s daughter Nebras finds it hard to deal with the family’s difficult circumstances.
“We have no computer, no TV, no devices and the house is too small. It is not enough," Nebras said.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) has labeled the demolition of the family homes of militants as a “war crime.”
“Justifying punishment of people who are not responsible for a criminal act just because they might ‘support’ it would set a dangerous precedent which could come back to haunt Israelis,” reads a statement issued by HRW in November 2014. Israeli critics of this policy, on the other hand, argue that it is ineffective because, as figures show, the number of attacks by Palestinians against Israel increases following house demolitions.

Demolition to expand settlements

In addition to demolishing homes as a punitive measure, Israeli authorities also destroy Palestinian homes built without a permit. Palestinians in the West Bank, however, usually cannot obtain such permits even if they apply for them.
According to the pro-peace Israeli monitoring group B’Tselem, Israel has demolished 545 houses that belong to Palestinians in east Jerusalem between 2004 and 2014. This has made 2,115 people homeless. Some people take down their homes with their own hands in order to avoid paying demolition charges to Israeli authorities, according to the organization’s official website.
The Zeer family, made up of a mother, a father and five children, now lives in a cave after Israeli authorities razed their house twice, without giving them a clear explanation.
“Sometimes they [Israeli authorities] claim that this is an agricultural area. At other times they claim that we do not a have a [building] permit,” said 40-year-old Khalid al-Zeer. “It seems that they want to uproot us and ethnically cleanse the original inhabitants from this land and move in settlers that they have gathered from around the world.” The small community of Israeli settlers in Silwan has recently expanded as dozens of them moved into the neighborhood in October, with the help of a right-wing organization called Ateret Kohanim that promotes Jewish settlement in east Jerusalem. The organization considers this influx a legitimate return to a village established by Yemenite Jews in the 1880s known in Hebrew as Kfar Hashiloah, which disappeared in the 1920s.
Eli Hazan, a member of the Israeli Likud party, defended his government’s policy of building settlements in the West Bank.
“We are going to stay in [the West Bank], therefore we are going to build in these places,” Hazan said. “We remember what happened from 1948 to 1967. Jews could not go to East Jerusalem. They could not go to the Western Wall and Mount of Olives.”

From the Palestinian point of view, however, this will only lead to more grief.

“This suffering and the suffering of every Jerusalemite will not be over until the end of the occupation,” said Enas Shalodi.

Tents and Tombstones: Bedouins in Isr...
Al-Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
10 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014
al-Araqib, Israel

Al Araqib is one of the 46 Bedouin villages in the Negev desert that the state of Israel refuses to recognize. The residents of the village, both past and present, inherited these lands from their fathers and grandfathers. Harassment from the Israeli Army and vigilanties has become commonplace for the Araqib Bedouin. The harassment dates back to 1948, when a gang of Zionist militants rounded up 14 Bedouin men working in a field in al-Araqib and summarily executed them. Since 1948, homes and properties in al-Araqib have been regularly destroyed and stolen. On July 27th, 2010, the village was totally demolished. Since then, the village has been re-built and destroyed 33 times. However, many residents were unable to stay and moved to the recognized village of Rahat. Those who did choose to stay are confined to the area of the Al-Turi cemetary and have been living under harsh conditions, always scared of an unexpected visit from the soldiers.

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Handicapped in the rubble of gaza 21
Gaza
By Sanaa Kamal , Zaher ghoul
21 Oct 2014

October 22, 2014
Gaza, Palestine

Jamil Attia Za'anin with his mother Donia Za'anin. Jamil, 21, developed a spinal condition 16 years ago when he was just a child. Poor healthcare infrastructure in Gaza meant that doctors could not properly treat Jamil, so the disease spread to his brain, leaving him handicapped. Jamil lives with his ten family members in a shack in the town of Beit Hanoun in the north of the Gaza Strip. He has a younger brother Mohammed, 19, who is also handicapped and the family's situation was made even worse after their house was destroyed in the recent war with Israel.

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The syrian nakba 32
Turkey
By adrian
14 Apr 2014

Samah, 29, Hama, 16 months, "My work and my home"

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The syrian nakba 34
Turkey
By adrian
14 Apr 2014

Somaya, 27, Damascus, 2 years, "Everything"

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The syrian nakba 43
Turkey, Turkey
By adrian
18 Mar 2014

Thaer, 40, Idlib, 1 year, "my own small country"

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HSVS
Turkey
By adrian
08 Dec 2013

Nassif. 30. Homs. 2 years. 'I feel bare without it'

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The syrian nakba 35
Turkey
By adrian
08 Dec 2013

Abdullah. 17. Aleppo. 1.5 years. "Sanctuary"

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Havana's Crumbling Houses
Havana, Cuba
By Transterra Editor
13 Sep 2013

Housing in Havana, Cuba

“It’s falling down.” This was the answer I invariably received when I asked the residents of Old and Central Havana about their homes. 

These photographs are born from my desire to see what living inside the crumbling grandeur of Havana’s buildings looks like. I photographed inside and outside almost a hundred different homes. Most of the homes I visited are in Old Havana.



Old Havana was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1982. Since this date, many buildings have been restored and though the work continues, the emphasis is always on preserving key buildings rather than improving or saving the lives of the general population. While certain buildings are done up to a high standard, the vast majority of the homes remain in a dangerous state. 

Age, decay, neglect, over-crowding and amateur repairs combine with natural factors to threaten the stability of Havana’s Baroque, Neoclassical and Art Deco buildings. There are two or three partial or totally building collapses in Old and Central Havana every week. Residents have no choice but to continue to live in these buildings that have partially collapsed.

Seven out of every ten homes are in need of major repairs, according to official statistics. Some of the main issues faced by the people living in Havana are dangerous, including outdated electrical wiring, basic or even nonexistent plumbing, floors and walls that are unstable or that have already caved in, collapsing roofs and ceilings, water damage, mold and dangerously unstable stairs.

A shortage of homes means the province around the capital needs some 300,000 more properties. Most of the once high-ceilinged houses of Havana have been divided both vertically and horizontally to provide more floor space. This puts the already weakened structures under additional strain. It also creates many dwellings with no windows or ventilation.

 Despite the many positive developments in education and healthcare the communist regime has bought about Cuba, it has failed with Article 9 of Cuba’s Constitution: The state shall work to ensure that no citizen is denied comfortable housing.


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The syrian nakba 33
Turkey
By adrian
14 Aug 2013

Samer, 34, Homs. 1 year 8 months. "My world was there"

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Italy Under Eviction
Milan, Italy
By Serene Yordi
26 Jul 2013

This is the story about the families of migrants and Italians facing the crisis with unemployment, high costs of life, and the precarious situation of losing the basic right to housing.

Technically, it’s called “guilty arrearage” and ends in eviction because of the poverty of the inhabitants. In 2013 in Italy 250.000 families risk this to happen to them, that’s an average of 140 evictions a day, almost 6 each hour. In the following years this phenomenon could even be more widespread due to the abolition of public support (“Fondo sostegno affitto nazionale”), which has been helping more than 350.000 families pay their rents. Even as the pressure on housing in the social emergency rise some 5.000 public houses remain empty, waiting to be surveyed and brought up to standard to be inhabited, and that’s just in the city of Milan.

I’ve built a close relation with several families and followed their stories from the notification of eviction to the day itself and being pushed out. Often the police and legal officers prevent me doing my work so I turn my focus to the other aspects of these stories, particulars that can reveal the dramatic experiences going on in these families lives. After the eviction, in fact, some families were rehoused temporarily, others went to cheeap hotels with the support of the municipality, but many others had no other choice than to sleep on the street while they await decisions being made on access to public social housing (which they have right to).

Many stories are focused on women who had only a part time jobs or no job at all, like Letizia, Maria, Cadija, Edy, Pina, Genny and Pina Cortese who we see in my photographs, all struggling to pay their rent, many have lost that battle already.
Cadija is from Morocco, she’s been living in Italy for 8 years. She’s unemployed and has a 17 years-old son. Cadija has already received three eviction notifications. Cadija has not received news of her husband, a Syrian national who went back to his homeland before the war started. She lost her job and now she hopes to received public social housing before eviction day.
Letizia experienced eviction in January. She has a 15 years-old daughter and her part time income does not allow her to pay the full rent. After the eviction she received a small flat to live, thanks to a local community association, but this solution is temporary and she hopes to receive full public social housing soon.
Maria has lost her job recently and was evicted from her home two months ago. Now she’s hosted in an emergency shelter run by a local organization. Edy was evicted last December and has a new born baby girl only a few months old. The society for whom she was working did not pay her salary for many months and in few months time her contract will change from full time to part time so her salary will decrease. Now she is staying at a friend’s apartment.
Pina is living at the first floor of a building without an elevator, she is severly disabled and has received her eviction notice.
Genny is living in the same building. She has no regular job and she has a chiold with special physical needs who can not live with her because of the lack of facilities in the house. She is expecting eviction soon.
Pina Cortese is 28 years old and she works in a shop in the city centre. A local committee of inhabitants protested and halted her eviction for the moment.

There are also stories of people who leave the country they have chosenre-migration to return to their place of birth, because of the lost of job and housing. This is the case for Peppe, a 53 year-old man living in the North of Italy for many years and now returning to Naples because of the loss of his job, the difficulty to find a new one, and the eviction that happened last January.
A similar story is that of a family from Egypt who have been living in Italy for the past 8 years. When Mohamed lost his job and his wife lost her permit to stay because she lost her job too, they decided to return to Egypt, just few days before they were evicted.

The families with many members are the most vulnerable, families of up to 6 often live in a 40 square metre apartment with little or no means to apply to public housing to relocate. The Mauhay family, Arnold, Mardy and their children Adrian, Alessa and Angel, were living in a house in the north of Milan. The building was very badly maintained, the stairs had no lights and the dangerous electric wiring affected their house. After their eviction they are living in a hotel with the support of the municipality.
Valeria and Mario were the guardians of a villa belongiong to a rich family in Milan. After they lost their jobs they found themselves, at the age of 60 unemployed like their two 30-year-old sons. After the eviction they are seeking support from a local organization.
Kumara and Mary are, as many others, victims of the illegal rent black marke). As they are undocumented migrants it is impossible for them to register without permits for a housing contract. When they tried to ask to the house owner to give them a proper lease he increase the rent. They were unable to pay and soon after received an eviction notification. Now Kumara is living in his car, and Mary is hosted in a protection housing with their son, Nathaka.
Flavio, Rosaria and Nancy are a young family. Flavio has no regular job and Rosaria is a teacher with an unstable contract. Two months ago a committee of local residents protested their evicition and won a temporary stay for the family.
The Al Badaui family is composed of Ayman and Abir, Maram, Mariam, Mohamed and the little Samer. Abir does not speak Italian and takes care of the house and family while Ayman works as a cleaner at the airport. When his working hours were reduced he became unable to pay his rent so they received an eviction notification. The committee of residents in their block organized a sit-in and their eviction has been postponed. The family has some chance to receive a public social house, but, as Ayman told me, the solidarity his family has received from the local residents has given them the most support, restoring their strength and their sense of humanity.

For a more selective photo essay, click here: http://www.transterramedia.com/collections/1324