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Minab Market
Panjshambe Bazaar”
By Pantea Naghavi Anaraki
04 Mar 2018

The Market In Minab Is Held Every Thursday.

The “Panjshambe Bazaar” attracts people from all over the Hormozgan region of southern Iran. And amid the Farsi dialect of Minabi, other languages spoken here include Arabic and Urdu.These women wanted a photo of the baby only, until I showed them the image on camera. Amazed – by technology, they then posed for me, giggling, enjoying the attention of onlookers. Everyone seemingly, bewildered by this “event”.

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The Amazonian Rain Forest: Farming an...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
20 Sep 2016

This collection highlights the deforestation of the Amazon due to cattle farming and corn farming. Various shots provide a look at the rain forest in its virgin state; workers felling trees to clear the land; a fire at night from slash and burn agriculture; a cattle ranch on cleared rain forest and a corn farm on cleared rain forest land. 

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Fire in the Amazonian Rain Forest (Sl...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain Forest using the slash and burn technique.

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Cattle Ranch in the Amazonian Rain Fo...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a cattle ranch in the Amazonian Rain Forest built on cleared Amazonian Rain Forest.

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Corn Farm in the Amazonian Rain Forest
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a corn farm featuring wide, sweeping vistas of corn and irrigation equipment in the Brazilian province of Minas Gerais. The corn farm was built on cleared rain forest land.

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Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain F...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of workers clearing and moving trees in the Amazonian Rain Forest using heavy equipment, bulldozers and front-loaders.

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Kenya's Sengwer Tribe Faces Eviction ...
Embobut, Kenya
By danubestory
06 Mar 2015

Embobut, Kenya
March 6, 2015

The Sengwer, a tribe of hunter-gatherers and beekeepers who also keep livestock, have lived in Cherangany mountains in Kenya - land they consider sacred - for centuries. Today, they face eviction from their ancestral lands. Approximately 12,000 people were told to move from the forest area to make way for a nature conservation and reforestation project financed by the Kenyan government and the World Bank. The Sengwer, however, pride themselves for their traditional methods for preserving their heritage lands. When they refused, forest guards began burning down their houses.

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Controversial Dam Project Threatens P...
Nahr Ibrahim
By Suzanne Baaklini
09 Feb 2015

Nahr Ibrahim, Lebanon
Febraury 9, 2015

The construction of a dam in the area of Janna, Lebanon, is causing wide controversy among local residents, ecologists and even certain politicians.
Janna, whose name means ‘paradise’ in Arabic, is a picturesque valley near Ibrahim River in north Lebanon, which hosts a rare ecosystem according to ecologists. Concerned Lebanese fear that this project will ruin the natural site without succeeding in retaining water. Geologist Samir Zaatiti warns that the surface on which the dam is being built covers large pits that absorb water.
There are also fears that the project might threaten the water source that feeds the Jeita Grotto, a submerged cave known as a tourist destination.
Preparations for the construction have started and many trees in the areas have been cleared.
Despite its rich water resources, Lebanon has struggled with a water distribution crisis due to the lack of adequate infrastructure.

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Dr. Samir Zaatiti, Hydrologist:
04:57 – 14:04

“While conducting a geological probe, huge amounts of unground water were discovered, almost 300 meters deep. Water rose from the depth of 300 meters to 170 meters. It is compressed and has a good quality. It f lies directly below the dam. Instead of building a dam, you can dig wells. The nearby villages have many wells and they exploit underground water. Janna dam and the other small dams are located in high mountain areas. Rocks in those areas are made of carbonates; they form what we call karst, or karst containers. It is a type of fractured rocks that melt in the rain and cause caves. Karsts, as a geological structure, do not allow building dams in those areas. This is in addition to the fact that these areas are small and elevated. Nature is convenient for building dams in the Beqaa, on the Assi and Litani rivers, and on the Wazzani River in the south because the ground is impermeable and does not allow vertical leakage into the ground. An example of vertical leakage is in Brisa dam [in North Lebanon]. It is built on a karst and underneath there are pits under the surface, which is normal when the surface is made of limestone. In Brisa, water leaked into the ground and the concrete that was added concrete also collapsed. Now the dam is completely dry, even in this winter with all the rain that has fallen. The dam took 12 years to be built and it did not hold a single drop of water. We have a live example and Janna dam will be the same.
My professor Michel Bakrovich, the president of the French Hydrologist Association, AHF, believes that this dam will be a sieve. He said that it will be dangerous. We are raising our voice, saying this dam will not fulfil its purpose.
The amount of water we have in Lebanon was surveyed, and the result was that we have about 10 billion [cubic meters] that comes from rainfall and snow. We only have 1.3 billion [cubic meters] of surface water, including all the springs and all the surface water that we see.
The volume of underground water, which leaks through karsts to form a renewable water reserve, is estimated at about 3 billion [cubic meters]. If we do not use this water, it will go to the sea, to our neighbours in the north and our neighbours in the south.

08:09
Almost one quarter of [Lebanon’s water reserves] is above the surface and three quarters of it is underground. What is happening is that projects are targeting one quarter of the water reserves, under the claim that it will protect the remaining three quarters from pollution and salinization. In an area in Byblos, when a well was dug, water became a bit salty because it was close to the sea.
It was decided that all of Lebanon’s water is underground water, without knowing which reservoirs or areas are being discussed.
They realized that Ibrahim River, where Janna dam is located, and the Roweisat spring and Afqa spring feed the Jeita grotto which, along with Ashoosh spring, provides about 80 to 90 % of Beirut’s water supplies. Those studies are documented, but they were not mentioned. The problem of the BGR [the association that conducted the study] is that in Lebanon the financial officer is also the technical officer; there is a lot of pressure in Lebanon [to appoint certain officials]. They wrote about this matter, but only in a presentation in Morocco where they were under the supervision of the International Hydrologists Association. A Lebanese center for studies claims that what the AIH were saying is not true, this center does not even have a single geologist or hydrologist. They should not insult the intelligence of Lebanese people. At the end of the day, it is science what solves our problems, not empty claims. Those people worked since 2012 and gave us their data.
There is a risk of earthquakes under the dam, and because of the Karst and the nature of the surface in the area; there are many caves which causes water leakage. An experiment was conducted on the Roweisat and Afqa springs, which together form Ibrahim river. Water was measured when it entered the Jurassic Karst; its volume was one cubic meter, they measured it after it exited the Jurassic karst area and it was 0.7 cubic meter, so 0.3 cubic meter of water went into the ground. They made maps and took photos of what happened.
If they build the dam, it will not hold water. You have to work with nature to be able to get what you need. Even if they placed a layer of clay on the leaking area, as was done in Brisa, the clay layer will bend down where there is vacancy, and the pressure on water on the twisted area will cause a leakage. There is a probability that this might happen in Janna, and treating karst is very difficult and costs a lot of money. So why insist on building the dam in this area? It will not succeed. If we have a river flowing over a crack in the surface, the probability of leakage is 30%. However, if you raise the level of water running over the crack, it will raise the level of water leakage. BGR have estimated the rate of leakage to be 52%; almost half of the water in the dam will go to waste. And also, they talk about a dam that holds 39 million cubic meters. We want to know, are these 39 million cubic meters before the evaporation takes place or after? The level of evaporation in that area is 50% or 48% to be exact. All of those studies are mentioned in the United Nations report, which they claim is old because it dates from 1970, but the geological nature of an area does not change quickly. It takes millions of years to change. There is a large amount of neglected data, and many claims that are not based on scientific facts. The biggest scandal is Brisa dam; it took 12 years of work, cost millions of dollars, yet farmers are still waiting for water. At the end, not a single drop of water was held by the dam.
If the Janna dam is built, the artificial lake it will not fill entirely. If it does contain some water, it will barely be enough for the surrounding areas. Damour dam and the other existing dams are working in a way that is completely the opposite of what was mentioned in the United Nations report in 1970, they said that we can store water on the surface but only in specific areas, in Assi, Litani and Wazzani. These dams can hold a maximum of 500 million cubic meters."

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, man), Jean Abi Akar, Local Resident
14:05 – 14:41

"We have lived in this area since 1820. Our grandparents’ bones are here, as well as their sweat and blood. Nobody was able to preserve this land. The monks were not able to preserve this and did not allow us to preserve it either. We were displaced gradually and promised to be given a substitute a land as a replacement, but nobody cares about us. We still have a small piece of land left. However, all of our relatives and our cousins left. My brothers and I are the only ones who remained here. They took half of our land, but in general, they forced everyone to leave."

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Raja Noujaim, Archaeologist and member of the Association to Protect Lebanon’s Heritage
14:41 – 20:45

"This project has been a violation since the start. The Ministry of Energy started the work based on incomplete studies, which are still incomplete until this day. We are working today, or, in fact, they are working today based on conditional studies. Today, the Ministry of Energy is working while the studies have not been finished. There are studies that should be done, aside from the studying the environmental impact of the project. They should have been done before signing the decree. Now they have a problem that they are trying to hide. The Ministry of Environment started to seriously demand them [the Ministry of Energy] to stop the work and provide the required documents. Then it suddenly started supporting them. The Minister of Environment went on television and said that he is cooperating with them, while on the other hand he writes reports saying that there are about 10 or 15 missing studies, especially hydrological studies, which is impossible for them to provide. So, simply, the work is illegal, but when there is nobody from the government concerned enough to implement the laws, what is illegal becomes legal. This is our situation and our objection does not only come from the fact that we are environmentalists, but also Lebanese citizens. What we are saying is that nobody should start a project without finishing the required studies; you cannot do your experiments on the ground, especially in an important location such as this. But apparently nobody cares. Land acquisition should not start either, because owning the land is the beginning of executing the project. It should not start until the studies are finished and the assessment of the environmental impact is finished and approved. What they are saying now, they hired people to do the environmental impact assessment, but that is not the issue, this should be agreed on, and they will never get the agreement. This project is very clear, we have done our own studies in this time and our studies are very clear, the dam will not retain water, because simply, the surface on which the dam will be built cannot hold water. The need for water can be fulfilled with a minimal cost and in a more efficient way. Khatib and Alami company have dug many wells, they call them ‘study wells.’ There is a well in Qartaba and another in Lassa, and one more in Serayta. These wells alone can fulfil the need for water for all of Byblos. They can provide 4 to 5 million cubic meters; this is the alternative solution. However, they are not interested in doing small projects like these. They want to do big projects, and of course, here we can see the corruption.
We are going to continue what we are doing; we have the legal path, which we are taking. If they want to continue to disrespect the law, there is going to be a problem. The Ministry of Agriculture has forced them to stop cutting trees until the environmental assessment is over and approved. However, we have another problem which you have witnessed on al-Mashnaqa road. While I am coming to this area through al-Mashnaqa road, I counted over 10,000 cut trees, they will cut over 40,000-50,000 trees from al-Mashnaqa road without permission. They are expanding the road in order to transport building equipment, which will be used when they start the construction. They act as if they do not care about permissions, I do not know where this problem can take us.
Work is still ongoing. Cutting trees has stopped here, but it is continuing over on al-Mashnaqa road. It was said that al-Mashnaqa road is an old project. It does not matter if it is old or new; they need the approval of the Ministry of Agriculture, and we are going to do all we can to guarantee they will not get that approval. This is enough. If one assesses the environmental impact of all this deforestation...
Until now, they received an approval to cut down 51,000 trees. If I look at these mountains and valley, I will see that these 51,000 trees have already been cut. They cannot keep going.
But the truth is there are over 300,000 trees and shrubs which will be cut in this area. I dare any expert to come and say that this operation does not have a negative influence. I dare any expert to say that this dam is being built to serve agriculture. The climate is going to change, let alone the ecosystem that is going to be influenced. We cannot speak only of the number of trees; we have to deal with this area as an entire system.
We are dealing with corrupt, ignorant people who claim to be scientists.
They also have hidden reports. They did not disclose all the reports, and I am certain that the ministry of energy does not have access to all the reports.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Joelle Barakat, Activist at the Association for the Protection of Jabal Moussa

20:46 – 23:24
The inhabitants of the area do not know exactly the heritage and environmental value attached to this valley. What is certain is that they all appreciate it and are proud to have it, they all swim in the water of this valley, drink it and use it for irrigation.
Many inhabitants of the area are farmers, so this river is vital for them. This dam is being constructed without taking into consideration that villages situated after the dam need the water they are receiving from Ibrahim River. There will be leakage due to the nature of the surface on which the dam is being built. To avoid the leakage, they will have to build a concrete surface, which will cause springs in the area and [Ibrahim] to dry. The river will lose its aesthetic value.
They already started to ruin the scene, as you can see behind us. This valley used to be a touristic destination for Lebanese people who used to go out on picnics. However, since they started blasting rocks and cutting trees down, tourists will no longer come here.
The water coming from the springs is drinking water, and some of it is used for irrigation. If they build the dam, the water that will be stored will not be destined to be used by the local inhabitants. It is not drinking water. It will be transferred to Beirut, after it passes through Dbayeh to be purified, and after the purifying process, it will not return to the local users. We have the impression that there is a cycle; water will be stored where it should not be, it will be taken to Dbayeh where it will cost money [to be purified]. In this whole operation, the local inhabitants are the only people who are suffering.
They are suffering because their natural environment will be ruined, they will no longer benefit from the valley it is a touristic site. Their oxygen will be depleted, the water they use is going to dry up. All of that is being done so that water which is not clean can reach Beirut; water that needs to be purified. On the other hand, there are many alternatives to this dam. These alternatives can provide water without harming the nature and the local inhabitants so much.
As members of the association to protect Jabal Moussa, we know that the value of this site comes from the valley. We are going to do all we can to stop the building of this dam. If they build this dam we are going to lose the valley, Jabal Moussa and the value of this entire area.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Jean Gebran, Ministry of Energy and Water Consultant
23:25 – 28:45
This is one of them most important dams in Lebanon and the region. This dam, which will be located in the Ibrahim River valley, will store 38 million cubic meters of water. Throughout the year, 250 million cubic meters of water pass through the valley. This dam will not have an environmental impact on the valley. Out of the 38 million cubic meters, 10 million cubic meters will be reserved for the area around Byblos. The remaining 28 million cubic meters will be reserved for the area of Metn and Greater Beirut. It will have a capacity to produce hydroelectric power that ranges from 100 to 140 megawatts. In Byblos, by the year 2050, they will need a maximum of 30 megawatts. The remaining amount of electric energy will cover the needs of the entire area.
The preliminary studies effectively started in 2009 but it was listed in the ten-year plan for dam building in 2000. In 2000, only the Shabrouh dam was executed. In 2009, the [Janna] dam was considered for study again. Studies about the environmental impact and other studies were conducted by a foreign firm, Segoria, in association with Khatib and Alami firm.
In 2012, a [new] code for environmental impact was issued, but the studies about the dam had already been conducted. There was study on how to improve the environmental impact according to the new code, which includes 17 new articles.
A committee from the Ministry of Environment was formed, as well as a committee from the Ministry of Energy and Water and the Beirut and Mount Lebanon Water Company. We examined all of these points and reached conclusions about 14 of them. The remaining articles require time to be studied. A new firm has been contracted to assess them. There will be concrete details about this in the next four or six months.
We know that water is very important in Lebanon and is the source of life. If this dam is built, it will improve the environment. As a worldwide concept, water improves the environment. It allows trees to grow and attract birds. Water causes the necessary humidity for… there is no [negative] environmental impact. I would like to clarify the fact that about a quarter of the Ibrahim River valley will be used. It is a very large valley. We will lose 290 million cubic meters is there was not a dam there. We will hold 38 million cubic meters as a constant reserve. This is why the environmental impact that is being talked about is exaggerated.
Regarding water leakage, to be honest with people, studies were concluded in 2012. There is no leakage. A German firm, BGR, says that there is leakage in Jeita. We commissioned a third party, a new firm, which conducted another study and confirmed that there are no leakages.

Interviewer: I would like to interrupt you. I never knew that another firm concluded that there is no leakage.

Jean Gebran: I can give you the reports, which come with some remarks. To make it simpler for the people, wells were dug above the river. Colored substances were poured into the wells. There should be leakage where the coulored substance reappears. After a month, it did not reappear in Jeita; it appeared in the river. This is the simplest explanation we can give to people. Major studies have shown that there is no leakage. In case there was a leakage, it could be remedied, which is mentioned in the study.
A member of the parliament once said that 100,000 trees were cleared to build the Beirut Airport. They were removed to build the airport. There are certain things in life that have a [high] price but in return for which you will get something. What [is the worth of] 53,000 trees? To clear some technical aspects, the number of trees that will be removed is not 53,000 trees. They estimate the number of trees according to the surface of the area that is being acquired, which is surveyed using Google [Earth]. They estimated the number of trees to be 53,000.
We are acquiring land that is 50 meters above the level of the dam. In a 50-meter perimeter around the dam trees will not be cleared. The number of trees that will be cleared is less than 53,000. It is around 35,000 or 40,000 trees. These trees are only shrubs. They are not are large trees. They are not pine trees, or other trees that we need.
The dam will make the valley more beautiful. It will attract birds and allow new types of trees to exist in the valley. The relation between man, nature and water will be organized. This is what life is all about. If you look at the negative aspect of the project, it will look negative. If look at its positive aspect, it will look positive.
Those who speak about the environment only concentrate on the environment. It is an illusion for people. We will certainly pay a price by removing trees and that the valley will be closed at certain locations, but water will be flowing and it will continue to feed Ibrahim River. The river will not be affected."

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Controversial Dam Project Threatens P...
Nahr Ibrahim
By Suzanne Baaklini
08 Feb 2015

Nahr Ibrahim, Lebanon
Febraury 9, 2015

The construction of a dam in the area of Janna, Lebanon, is causing wide controversy among local residents, ecologists and even certain politicians.
Janna, whose name means ‘paradise’ in Arabic, is a picturesque valley near Ibrahim River in north Lebanon, which hosts a rare ecosystem according to ecologists. Concerned Lebanese fear that this project will ruin the natural site without succeeding in retaining water. Geologist Samir Zaatiti warns that the surface on which the dam is being built covers large pits that absorb water.
There are also fears that the project might threaten the water source that feeds the Jeita Grotto, a submerged cave known as a tourist destination.
Preparations for the construction have started and many trees in the areas have been cleared.
Despite its rich water resources, Lebanon has struggled with a water distribution crisis due to the lack of adequate infrastructure.

The full version of the story is available here: https://www.transterramedia.com/media/56852

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Dr. Samir Zaatiti, Hydrologist:
0:17- 0:33
“My professor Michel Bakrovich, the president of the French Hydrologists Association, AHF, believes that this dam will be a like a sieve. He said that it will be dangerous. There is a high risk that earthquakes could occur under the dam.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Jean Abi Akar, Local Resident
00:42 – 00:57
“We have lived in this area since 1820. Our grandparents and fathers’ bones are here, as well as their sweat and blood. Nobody was able to preserve this land. The monks were not able to preserve this land and did not allow us to preserve it either. We were gradually displaced.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Raja Noujaim, Archaeologist and member of the Association to Protect Lebanon’s Heritage
00:58 – 01:33
“The study we have conducted is very clear; this dam will not retain water because the surface at its bottom does not allow it. There are wells that can cover the need for water in the entire Byblos area. However, they [the government] are not interested in doing small projects like these. They want to do big projects to boast about them. Of course, corruption is involved. “More than 300,000 trees and shrubs in this area will be cut down. I dare any expert to come and say that this operation does not have a negative influence. I dare any expert to say that this dam is being built to serve agriculture.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Joelle Barakat, Activist at the Association for the Protection of Jabal Moussa

01:48 – 02:12
“Many inhabitants of the area are farmers, so this river is vital for them. The local inhabitants are the only people who will suffer because of this project. Their natural environment will be ruined; they will no longer benefit from the valley as a touristic site. All of this is being done so that water which is not clean can reach Beirut; water that needs to be purified.”

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"state land"- fresh land seizure thre...
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Sep 2014

September 17, 2014.
Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine

Mohamed and his father Mustafa on their land. Israel cut down all of their olive trees, but they still find reason to love and laugh.

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"state land"- fresh land seizure thre...
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Sep 2014

September 17, 2014.
Wadi Fukin, West Bank, Palestine

The farmers produce their own olives, olive oil and vegetables. But their way of life is endangered by the building of settlements around them.

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Tree Planting in Western Canada
Alberta, Canada
By Luc Forsyth
19 Aug 2014

Tree planters sleep on the ground, work in the rain and snow, battle swarms of insects, and bend over thousands of times a day – all in the pursuit of money. Tree planting is part adventure and part iconic right of passage. The ultimate goal is to earn as much as possible before the season ends. While some “rookie” planters might struggle to earn enough to cover their expenses, a motivated and experienced planter can expect to earn upwards of $300 every day. The very best earn even more still. Many tree planters return to this job year after year in pursuit of a large payout, whether for tuition, travel, or investment.

Carrying all their equipment on their backs, and heavy loads of tree seedings makes tree planting a physically exhausting experience. In a national study, it was determined that a tree planter can burn up to 8000 calories in a single day of work.

Known nationally as one of the hardest jobs a young person can do, this story follows a camp of 42 tree planters over a difficult four month season in northern Alberta.

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North Korea in Black and White 005
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Jun 2014

residents walking around one of the mainy squares of Pyongyang. Pyongyang, North Korea.

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A village’s struggle to preserve its ...
Long La
By Corentin Fohlen
28 Mar 2014

Forests are the heart of Long La's development. In a country ravaged by deforestation, this village of 500 inhabitants has become a model of sustainable development. With the help of Speri, a vietnamese NGO, Long La has found a way to preserve its forest thanks to agroecology.

The forest is rich in medicinal plants and rare species and generates wealth for the community. Prior to 2004, it was threatened by timber exploitation. But its inhabitants soon realized that the water shortages they were facing were not normal and that the air was drier than it should have been in this tropical region.

It did not take long before they began to blame deforestation, which also adversely affects agricultural production. Today, forests cover 40% of the territory of Laos, whereas they made up 70% in the 1950s. In order to protect their forest, villagers in Long La reserved certain areas for the production of timber and others for medicinal plants. In some areas, it is now strictly forbidden to gather wood. They also enacted strict rules to preserve the forest, such as keeping farm animals in paddocks to prevent them from damaging trees.

In 2005, the Laotian government recognized Long La inhabitants' know-how and put them in charge of managing the village's forest. Doing so came naturally to the inhabitants since they all belong to the Hmong community, an animist ethnic group that considers the forest sacred. In Long La, the forest is even believed to host a venerated spirit: the Patongxenh.

Deforestation is being driven by corruption as well as poorly managed industrial-scale plantations for things like rubber. Yet Long La's management of the forest has proven that preservation can lead to development and wealth. Thanks to the forest, the village now cultivates Zong Zwa, a plant with bright yellow flowers that tastes similar to rocca. The village also produces 12 tons of organic vegetables each year which they sell to hotels and restaurants in Luang Prabang. Speri now works with 12 other villages to implement Long La's model. In 2012, the NGO and the villagers created a rural school to train local residents in agroecology.

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Gold Mining in Colorado 13
Colorado, United States
By Jon Cardwell
12 Mar 2014

Hillside with mine tailings, Stumptown Colorado. Stumptown was once the site of a booming mining industry. These times long since past, have left the hillside scattered with the remains of mine shafts and mine tailings - piles of material brought to the surface when excavating the mine tunnels. Modern day prospectors search these tailings with metal detectors, hoping to scavenge nuggets that were missed the first time around.

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
17 Sep 2013

Traditional oil miner gathers buckets of crude oil to begin the distillation process of converting it into diesel fuel. Distillation is accomplished by heating the filtered crude oil to between 200 °C (392 °F) and 350 °C (662 °F). Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
17 Sep 2013

Motorcycle is loaded with drums of diesel and transported to nearby villages to be sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
11 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey. 11th September 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Art by Christoph Schaefer. © Claudia Wiens

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Newroz in Kurdistan (2 of 33)
Batman, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
19 Mar 2013

Crowds climb trees to see the concert at Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

At Newroz, an ancient holiday celebrating the astronomical Northward equinox and the beginning of spring as well as the start of the new calander year in the Persian system. Newroz is celebrated by millions of Kurds and Iranians in the Middle East by, wearing colorful clothing and jumping over fires to welcome the spring holiday. Originally a Zoroastrian festival, Newroz is now embraced by the Kurds to celebrate cultural unity and political goals. The celebrations are occasionally marked by violence as the celebration only recently became legal in Turkey.

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African Wood Company Seeks to Refores...
Yatta, Kitui - Kenya
By Ruud Elmendorp
14 Nov 2012

The Africa Wood Grow company is trying a new angle on replanting, and combatting deforestation. They hope to make their endeavor lucrative, and attractive to business owners who need lumber, and other wood products.

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Home and work
Kaft el zayat, Egypt
By Al-Hussainy Mohamed
02 Nov 2012

Trees and a simply built house, one of the most famous scenes of the Egyptian countryside.

المشهد الأشهر في الريف المصري، الأشجار بجوار منزل بسيط.

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
26 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner scoops crude out of collection tank. The oil which has settled on the top of the water will be distilled into diesel when heated in an oil drum and then sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner gathers buckets of crude oil to begin the distillation process of converting it into diesel fuel. Distillation is accomplished by heating the filtered crude oil to between 200 °C (392 °F) and 350 °C (662 °F). Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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What a Trip! Cycling from Germany to ...
Germany, Tschech Republik, Poland, Ukraine, Russia, Kazakhstan, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore
By Maximilian Semsch
02 May 2008

In 2008 Maximilian Semsch at the age of 24 cycled from Munich to Singapore to find out more about himself and to go on a real adventure, as life must be more than just working. He did the journey all by himself, without the help of a professional camera team. As there was no one to talk to, his camera became his best friend during the trip. His journey started in May 2008 in his hometown Munich. His route took him through Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine into Russia and further on to Kazakhstan. Semsch then did hit rock bottom, as he was refused a visa and couldn't enter China. After days of consideration he did decide to skip China and flew to Thailand. His route through south-east Asia took him from Thailand to Cambodia back into Thailand and via Malaysia he finally reached Singapore, after 211 days and 13.500km on his bike. Semsch recorded everything on his trip. The nice and helpful people he bumped into, drinking vodka in Russia with complete strangers and its aftermath of a hangover the next day but he also tells about his fight against loneliness, heat and extreme headwind. He always does it in a very personal way that gives the audience the feeling of sitting on the back of his bike.