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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
15 Jun 2013

10 year old Emmanuel searches for small rocks by the roadside of Yenagoa, capital of oil rich, Bayelsa state, Nigeria to support his family.

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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
15 Jun 2013

10 year old Emmanuel drags his two sacks in search for small rocks by the road side of Yenagoa, capital of oil rich, Bayelsa state, Nigeria to supports his family.

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Daily Life - Poverty & Homelessness (...
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
15 Jun 2013

10 year old Emmanuel stands before small rocks by the road side of Yenagoa, capital of oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria, collected to support his family.

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Traffic Of Karachi
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
15 Jun 2013

Every day thousand of Commuters stuck in traffic jam, when returning their home from offices because of undisciplined driving and always blames system and traffic police.
Main reason of traffic jam in Karachi that from Carts to donkey Carts, bicycle to motorbike, Taxi to Private cars of all sizes, Mini buses, Buses to Goods Trucks of all sizes are running on 100 Ft to 150 ft wide road with out following the rules of traffic, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Summer's Hot Waves in Karachi
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
15 Jun 2013

Nowadays Karachi is under the heat waves of Summer and the afternoons are hotter than expectations, average 37 degree centigrade with the humidity of 44%.
A Rikshaw Driver sleeping at the back seat of his Rikhsaw during hot summer afternoon, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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There is a Will, There is a Way
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
15 Jun 2013

Nowadays Karachi is under the Heat waves of Summer and the afternoons are hotter than expectations, average 37 degree centigrade with the humidity of 44%.
Some of the gypsy families living in Karachi made there own ways for living in Hot weather condition like they used to use in their villages but with the help of sewerage water under the bridge and feeding their animals, Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.

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Spills & Curses (12 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
15 Jun 2013

5 year old Fortune, Freeborn's daughter, sits in the front of their home surrounded by spilled crude from Royal Dutch Shell Facility in Ikarama community in the oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

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Spills & Curses (8 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

A Boy from crude ravaged community of Ikarama near Royal Dutch Shell Facility plays with spill crude in the oil rich Bayelsa,Nigeria.

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Spills & Curses (4 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

Farmland covered with spilled crude from Royal Dutch Shell Facility at Ikarama community of oil rich Bayelsa state,Nigeria .

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Spills & Curses (10 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

Freeborn's family stands in front of their home near Royal Dutch Shell Facility in Ikarama community in the oil rich Bayelsa State, Nigeria.

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Spills & Curses (9 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

5 year-old Fortune stands at the entrance to their home, recently surrounded by crude oil spill from Royal Dutch Facility in Ikarama community in the oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

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Spills & Curses (6 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

Alagoa Morris, an environmental activist with a shirt saying "Climate Justice now," takes a snap shot at the spill site at Ikarama community near Royal Dutch Shell Facility in the oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

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Spills & Curses (5 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

Alagoa Morris, an environmentalist, walks through the bush around the recent Royal Dutch Shell spill site at Ikarama of oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

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Spills & Curses (3 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

Farmland covered with spilled crude from Royal Dutch Shell Facility at Ikarama community of oil rich Bayelsa state,Nigeria .

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Mozambique Tea Estates
Gurue, Zambezia, Mozambique
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
14 Jun 2013

Gurué, town and history

Once called the Switzerland of Mozambique, Gurué, in Zambezia Province, centre of Mozambique is forgotten for decades after the independence of country and three decades of civil war.
In colonial times, the district, founded in the 19th century and named, later, Vila Junqueiro, was the biggest tea region in Mozambique, having a total of fifteen factories processing tea leaf and exporting worldwide. Now only three to five remains working without major problems and in tentative of a constant and uniform production.
Due to the high level of the region (having the second highest peak in Mozambique - Namuli Mountain) and the wet climate, the settlers, one century ago, found this place with the proper conditions for tea plantations. The landscape was largely transformed to grow tea and tea tasters from India and producers from Europe began building the city with its houses, factories and other infrastructures. Gurué is a model in colonial architecture with a well preserved number of houses, churches, and other vestiges of Portuguese heritage.
By the middle of 20th century, brands like Chá Moçambique, Chá Licungo and Chá Gurué as others, achieved international recognition in Europe, Great Britain and even America and Canada. It was the time of the tea aristocracy with its wealthy style of living making this place be named Switzerland of Mozambique.
Nowadays, the Lomwe people, continue to work in the tea, this time owned not by the old settlers but mainly by Indian capitals. However the production is far from the 70´s of last century. The independence from Portugal in 1975 made the old European aristocracy run back to the metropole. Everything was abandoned and three decades of civil war along with leftist collective economy politics, leaded by the single ruling party FRELIMO, made the production decreases and most of the factory’s get nationalized and later closed, destroyed and abandoned.
Meanwhile the intense green, the complete transformation of the landscape made by the vast tea plantations, the unique climate and its isolation together with the individuality of this Mozambican region make Gurué a must visit destination.

The tea culture, past and present

By the late 70´s of the past century, Gurué with its 15 tea factories was producing an average of 19.000 tons per year of processed leaf employing around 28.000 workers from the city and neighbor villages. It was the time of around 300 settlers, ruling sometimes using forced labour brought even from other provinces, own plantations that reached near 9.000 hectares of cropped land. It was the golden era of Mozambican tea and of the city itself.
By 2012, the last figure shows that the production was reduced to a number of around 2.500 tons, just thirteen per cent of the average before independence and with an area used of just 5.700 ha, near half of the past. The industry employs now around 3.000 workers in peak periods but just 250 are in an effective job situation. This figure makes the tea jobs, once a major employment industry as just a part of the solution for the daily income in one of the poorest countries in the world for these Lomwe people.
With a ratio of two workers per hectare, picking the leaf into wood baskets that they hang in their back, its necessary to work two entire days to receive about eighty metical’s (three dollars) for each fifty kilograms of leaf picked. It’s around one dollar and half a day, when there is leaf to be picked. To make the situation worst, at least in two of the five active factories, there are about 8 months of salary with late payment. This situation creates a vicious cycle where the employer don’t pay and the workers, in a silent and quiet strike, are pushed for an inactivity, tactically and inevitable, making all this industry atrophy year after year in this isolated region of Mozambique.
Together with the low wages and late payments that make the productions much lower than before, also the plant itself, named camellia sinensis is no longer strong and able for productions per hectare comparable with the figures achieved in the last century. Planted mainly in the 60´s of the last century, the plant need to be replaced with other varieties more productive and adequate to the region. This fact make the tea decrease its quality what creates difficulties in the sales at the international markets. From the neighbor producing countries like Malawi and Kenya, Mozambique is the only one that up to know didn't renovate the old plants.
All this facts make the income of the industry decrease significantly. The actual owners of the industry, mainly Indian capitals and in one case a joint venture between Indians and Mozambicans claim they need about 100 millions of dollars of investment for the renovation of the potential 10.000 hectares of the crops and with that bring the production to the old values achieved before independence. They also claim that due the actual panorama, bank credit is difficult to get to support the modernization of the business. The low productions and low quality make this business unable to deal directly with international buyers and inevitably part of the production must be sold in auction flours in Kenya and other part sold internally. The situation of sell it in auction flours makes the final price be much more vulnerable to the market price fluctuations and much difficult to deal in good terms and conditions. Resuming, the business in its actual situation don’t encourage the exportation of the goods due to the actual market sold prices. With an average of 1 dollar per kg as sold price and low productions, it is not enough to export directly to international markets worldwide. Far are the times that the tea was directly exported to Europe, America and Canada and Gurué was the Switzerland of Mozambique.

Perspectives for the future

With a recently created producer association, in 2011, ideas and hope for solutions are being discussed to change the actual wilt panorama. One is to bring more power and control to the workers instead of being mere wage earner from the capitals that owns the industry. The simple be employed conditions have shown that it is not an adjusted solution for the present times. The idea of create and provide conditions for small production associations and family’s to grown themselves the tea leaf and sold later to the industries is gaining adepts.
With this solution, the production of the leaf would be passed to the workers in form of associations or among their families. It would make easier that small financial loans, difficult to get by the owner of the factories, could create big changes. Instead of being mere employed, the workers would be responsible and be more active in the production of the crop. By the other side, the factories would spend less financial resources in some operations like fertilizing, that due the general poverty of the workers and few control see many times the products being robbed, employing and others and would concentrate and specialize just in the leaf processing, packing and exporting. That’s the new hope for Gurué industry and for Lomwe people in the interior of Zambezia Province.

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Trekking in a 20 million year old rai...
Madeira, Portugal
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
14 Jun 2013

Trekking paths follows the water channels for more than 200 routes inside the island

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Mozambique Tea Estates
Gurue, Zambezia, Mozambique
By Mais Istanbuli
14 Jun 2013

Once called the the Switzerland of Mozambique, Gurué, in Zambezia Province, center of Mozambique stays forgotten for decades after the independence of Mozambique and three decades of civil war.

In colonial times, the disrict, founded in the 19th century and named Vila Junqueiro, was the biggest tea region in Mozambique, having a total of 5 factories processing tea leafs and exporting worldwide. Now only remains one factory working.

Due to the high level of the region (having the second highest mountain in Mozambique - Namuli Mountain with 2.419 m above sea level) and the wet climate, the settlers, one century ago, found this place with the proper conditions for tea plantations. The landscape was largely transformed to grow tea and tea tasters began building houses. Gurué is a model in colonial architecture with a well preserved number of traditional houses, churches, and other vestiges of Portuguese presence.

Now, the Lomwe people, continue to cultivate the tea, this time owned not by the old settlers but by Indian capitals. However the production is far from the 70´s values of last century. The independence made the old lords run away, back to Europe, everything was abandoned and three decades of civil war made four from the five factory close, get ruined and abandoned.

Meanwhile the intense green, the complete transformation of the landscape made by the vast tea plantations, the unique climate and it's isolation together with the individuality of the Mozambique region make Gurué a tourist destination.

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Spills & Curses (16 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

Freeborn Roland viewing spilled crude oil from Royal Dutch Shell facility behind his home in the Ikarama community of oil rich Bayelsa state Nigeria

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Spills & Curses (15 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

Freeborn Roland excavates spoiled cassava crop as a result of spilled crude from Royal Dutch Shell facility near his home in Ikrama community in the oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

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Spills & Curses (14 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

36 year-old, Freeborn Roland, a father of four children sits in his home near Royal Dutch Shell Facility in Ikarama community in the oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

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Spills & Curses (13 of 20)
Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria
By Tife Owolabi
14 Jun 2013

Freeborn wife and four children, including four month-old twins pose to camera in their near Royal Dutch Shell recent spill in Ikarama community of oil rich Bayelsa state, Nigeria.

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Tea Estates in Mozambique (2 of 13)
Mozambique
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
11 Jun 2013

Enormous tea fields in the valley of Gurué, Mozambique.

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KENYA GAME RANGERS
Tsavo East, Kenya
By U.S. Editor
10 Jun 2013

The Tsavo East National Park together with the Tsavo West National Park forms one of the largest National parks in the world and covers a massive 4% of Kenya’s total land area. Tsavo East the larger of the two, lies to the east of the Nairobi –Mombasa road and offers a vast and untapped arena of arid bush which is washed by azure and emerald meandering of Galana River. Guarded by the limitless lava reaches of Yatta plateau and patrolled by some of the largest elephant herds in Kenya

To View More Photos Go To: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1244

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Kenya Game Rangers
Tsavo East, Kenya
By U.S. Editor
10 Jun 2013

The Joint mass of Tsavo West and Tsavo East National Parks forms one of the largest National parks in the world and covers a massive 4% of Kenya’s total land area. Tsavo East the larger of the two, lies to the east of the Nairobi –Mombasa road, equidistant between Nairobi and Mombasa, and offers a vast and untapped arena of arid bush which is washed by azure and emerald meandering of Galana River. Guarded by the limitless lava reaches of Yatta plateau and patrolled by some of the largest elephant herds in Kenya

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (22 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
09 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Rangers from the anti poaching unit during a patrol in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 9 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (8 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
09 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Rangers from the anti poaching unit during a patrol in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 9 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (21 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
09 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Ranger Stephen Lewagat from the anti poaching unit during a patrol in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 9 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (20 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
09 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Ranger Sgt.Benson Epae gesture to fellow rangers as they approach a illegal charcoal sight in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 9 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (5 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
09 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Rangers from the anti poaching unit chase cattle grazing inside the park in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 9 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (4 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
09 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Rangers from the anti poaching unit chase cattle grazing inside the park in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 9 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (18 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
09 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Rangers from the anti poaching unit chase cattle grazing inside the park out through a fence in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 9 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (3 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
09 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Rangers question Kenyan Somali herders as they move their cattle just outside the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 9 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (17 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
09 Jun 2013

Exhausted Kenyan Somali herders sleep as they move their cattle just outside the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 9 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO