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Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quie...
mangochi
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

the lake is the 3rd biggest in Africa and have unique landscapes as well wild life.

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Lake Malawi (4 of 19)
Lake Malawi, Africa
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Cape Maclear is a paradise for backpacking tourists that spend their times under the Malawian sun with the people on the shores. This village, together with Nkhata Bay, Monkey Bay and Livingstonia are the main attractions for Malawi tourism and an important revenue for the country.

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Lake Malawi (8 of 19)
Lake Malawi, Africa
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

In the waters of the lake, a collection of fresh water animals are fished out and sold worldwide for aquarium enthusiasts. Locals dive without oxygen up to 10 meters below the water surface to pick Cychlids fish with colors that range from deep blue, red, yellow or other colors. They are sold to some lodges that export them internationally.

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Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quie...
senga bay
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Raining season make the water get more turbulent and bring to the shores rests of trees and others that are collected by the locals to do ropes, fences and have other uses.

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Lake Malawi (6 of 19)
Lake Malawi, Africa
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Children playing football on the fine sands of the lake in Senga Bay

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Lake Malawi (5 of 19)
Lake Malawi, Africa
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

The daily life at the lake revolves around fishing, taking baths and washing clothes on the shore.

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Lake Malawi (9 of 19)
Lake Malawi, Africa
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 Aug 2013

Chambo fish served with nsima (boiled maize) is the national dish in Malawi.

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Xanti Mortu
By Andrea Falletta
05 Aug 2013

August 2013 - The last big assembly during which the 432 miners were told that Carbosulcis Industry, the last remaining coal mine in Italy, would soon close.

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Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quie...
malawi
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
04 Aug 2013

Lake Malawi - turbulent times in quiet waters

David Livingstone named it lake of the starts in 1867 after seen the spectacle of the lights that hundreds of traditional fishing boats use during the night to fish in its waters. Mozambicans and Tanzanians call it Lake Niassa, but internationally it’s called Lake Malawi. It’s the 9th biggest lake in the world, the 3rd in Africa, after Lake Tanganyika and Lake Vitoria, and the most southern lake in the great African rift valley.
Even before the independence of Tanzania and Malawi, there was already a dispute on its name and its borders, but now the probable oil reserves that the 700 meters deep of its waters reserves for millions of years bring a new fear in this part of Southern Africa – the specter of war to keep the sovereignty of the water and what lays in its bottom.

With an average dimension of 560km length per 75km width, more than 1000 species of cichlids fish and more species of fishes than any other body of fresh water in the world, Lake Malawi hosts borders between three countries; Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania. Between the first two, the water is divided by the middle and there are no questions of who manage which side. But between Tanzania and Malawi a crescent fight in words is taking place between both governments. That’s the reason why a committee from South Africa Development Community headed by the former South African President Tabo Mbheki and the former Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano are trying to solve amicably this dispute to keep the waters of Lake Malawi quiet as they always were.

The recent dispute, started two years ago when sounded that the lake could have big oil reserves and Malawi started allowing international firms to survey its bottom. Tanzania warned that half of the lake it´s from the country and recently, in July 2013, warned that if necessary its army is ready to guard and fight for the country territory. In the other side, Malawi, a poor country that never have seen war in its history, known as the Warm Heart of Africa and cited in various tourism guides as one of the peaceful and friendly countries in the world already said that don´t want war and it will take the case to the International Court of Justice to decide fairly who have reason.

Both countries guide themselves by the 1840 Heligoland Treaty signed by the victorious Great Britain over Tanganyika (the old name for Tanzania) from Germany. It was decided that all the water would be managed and part of Nyasaland which now is Malawi.
For the last 50 years, this fight has been cordial and peaceful once there was just water, fisherman in its canoes and wild life. But now, the oil industry and the perspectives of explore it, bringing income for one of the countries, makes this dispute increase the tone of the words changed between the two nations and worry the neighbor community.

Apart of this, fisherman all around the lake shores continues to live and survive in a simple way of life paddling their canoes and the cichlids fishes showing its colours above the waters of the lake.

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River be dammed 26
Nong Kiew, Laos
By David Tacon
03 Aug 2013

Men work at the site of the massive Nam Ou 2 Dam currently under construction by Chinese hydropower giant Sinohydro on the Nam Ou River. Nam Ou 2 is expected to be completed in just three years and is part of a cascade of seven dams on the 450 km long river.

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After the Spring in Yemen (28 of 28)
Hadramawt, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Aug 2013

Aerial view of the vast harsh lands in Hadramawt province.

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Daily Life After the Spring in Yemen
Sanaa, Yemen
By Serene Yordi
01 Aug 2013

A picture of daily life in Yemen after early 2011 when the Yemeni youth took the streets and forced the ouster of Yemen’s autocratic President, Ali Abdullah Saleh. Yemen, one of the poorest countries in the Arab World, is now experiencing a transition rife with political corruption, unemployment, a real proliferation of AQAP (Al Qaida in the Arab Peninsula) and a depletion of natural resources. But though Yemen continues to feel the consequences post-revolution, people carry on their day to day work, traditional and holiday celebrations, as well as protests in the streets. The photographer documented this everyday existence over the course of a year in Yemen.

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Flash Floods in China
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By Serene Yordi
19 Jul 2013

Recent torrential rains and flash flooding in Kunming have caused over 84 million Yuan ($13.6 million) in damage to the city, with one person missing, according to initial reports from the Yunnan Provincial Department of Civil Affairs. The flood affected over 77,000 Kunming residents, while testing the city’s drainage system and its infrastructure. The north and east of the city appeared to be two of the worst impacted areas which faced major traffic standstills after the flooding. This year, the Yunnan province has experienced historically high rainfall levels, causing dozens of fatalities and millions of dollars in damage.

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Flash Floods in China (5 of 15)
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By HughBohane
19 Jul 2013

A man assesses the damage inside his flooded apartment complex.

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Flash Floods in China (3 of 15)
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By HughBohane
19 Jul 2013

Shopkeepers try to save some of their inventory amidst rising waters.

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Flash Floods in China (11 of 15)
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By HughBohane
19 Jul 2013

A view up Beijing Road, where the under-construction subway was completely submerged.

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Flash Floods in China (9 of 15)
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By HughBohane
19 Jul 2013

Two businessmen make their way through the flood waters.

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Flash Floods in China (2 of 15)
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By HughBohane
19 Jul 2013

A traffic police officer shares his island with stranded pedestrians.

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Flash Floods in China (14 of 15)
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By HughBohane
19 Jul 2013

A young woman is driven away in the back of a tricycle.

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Flash Floods in China (13 of 15)
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By HughBohane
19 Jul 2013

Although people attempted to drive, water around the city ultimately brought traffic to a standstill.

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Flash Floods in China (12 of 15)
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By HughBohane
19 Jul 2013

A young man helps an elderly man navigate the floodwaters on Beijing Road.

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Flash Floods in China (1 of 15)
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By HughBohane
19 Jul 2013

A view up Beijing Road, one of the areas where the flood was most critical.

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Flash Floods in China (15 of 15)
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By HughBohane
19 Jul 2013

A bird's eye view of emergency workers trying to clear water from an underpass at the city's North Railway Station. At its highpoint, water was roughly four meters deep in the underpass

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Flash Floods in China (8 of 15)
Kunming, Yunnan, China
By HughBohane
19 Jul 2013

Two friends make their way through a flooded intersection on a tricycle.

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Zabbaleen: A life in Cairo's garbages
Zabbaleen
By Simon Letellier
11 Jul 2013

The Zabbaleen are teenagers and adults who have served as Cairo's informal garbage collectors for approximately the past 70 to 80 years. Zabbaleen means "Garbage people" in Egyptian Arabic. The Zabbaleen are also known as Zarraba, which means "pig-pen operators."

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Shark finning: A Cruel Dish is Disapp...
Hong Kong
By maltekol
30 Jun 2013

The trade in Shark Fins has declined in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong is the world's shark fin capital, where about half of all fins are traded. But according to figures from the Hong Kong government imports last year of Shark fins dropped by a third.

For most Chinese, eating shark's fin still remains a status symbol. But as Malte Kollenberg reports young people are starting to view it differently.

This is how Shark fins are ‘harvested….
The fins are cut off a living shark and then the torso is thrown back into the ocean. Most of these fins from countries like Indonesia end up in Hong Kong.In 2008 around 10.000 tons of fins passed the city’s ports according to environmental organization Oceana.

INTV (English): Stanley Shea, Activist with French founded Bloom Association
“In Hong Kong in the old times they provided banquets which is all settled by the restaurant and the fin is always included in the banquet. So it leaves the customer, they actually have no choice to remove the dishes from the banquet set.”

But things started to change three years ago.
Under pressure from Environmental groups Governments in Hong Kong and Mainland China have stopped serving shark fins at official banquets. And big corporations as well as hotel chains are announcing they will take shark fin soup off their menus.

INTV (English): Stanley Shea, Activist with French founded Bloom Association
“We have been talking to corporate and also hotels and restaurants. And we found in Hong Kong now awareness has been increased and many hotels and restaurants now offer something alternative in the banquet menus so people can choose not to have it.”

According to the World Wildlife Fund, appetite for the fins and other shark-related products has led to some shark species falling in numbers by 60-70%.
But in March this year five more species of Shark were added to the Washington Convention, ensuring endangered species are not threatened by overfishing and trade.This means tradingof eightshark speciesis not possible without official documentation anymore.
Here is the Sheung Wan District …. Shark Fins are still openly being sold.

But small shops merchants say business lately is slow and they are reluctant to talk about shark fins on camera…it has become a sensitive topic.But not far away at restaurant Lin Heung Kui staff will still proudly tell you that shark fin soup is on the menu.

INTV(Cantonese): Unidentified employee in Restaurant
“We prepare and serve the fins in lots of ways - with a clear soup or with shredded chicken. It is definitely more popular at night. We offer an especially cheap deal at $88 at the moment, but sometimes people come to get more expensive dishes.”

Shark fin soup has been the food of the rich and wealthy for hundreds of years in China. Consumption of the fins is said to increase health.

But anthropologist Veronica Mak says generational change is taking place.

INTV (English): Veronica Mak, Anthropologist at the Chinese University of Hong Kong
“Not consuming shark fins becomes a signifier to show you are a social responsible person. In the past people made shark fins a signifier in a banquet, but nowadays this signifier changes.”

Activists believe that awareness and education is the key to change consumer behavior. And less demand for shark fins here will result in fewer sharks left for dead in the world’s oceans.

Video footage of fishermen "harvesting" fins is courtesy of Greenpeace. The footage was licensed from Greenpeace to be included into the video report.

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Aquaponics in Egypt (9 of 14)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
23 Jun 2013

A small aquaponics farm produces vegetables and fish by combining hydroponics and aquaculture. The farm, which is in the desert outskirts of Cairo, uses 90% less water than conventional farming.

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Aquaponics in Egypt (8 of 14)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
23 Jun 2013

A worker on a small aquaponics farm passes through the barrier separating fish and vegetable production from the harsh desert outside. By harnessing efficiency in nature, the farm can use a closed water cycle to reduce waste.

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Aquaponics in Egypt (6 of 14)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
23 Jun 2013

With aquaponics, the water is filtered from the fish tanks to the plant roots and back. By eliminating soil, efficiency of space allows for better cultivation. Ziad Abou El Nasr and his partner plan to introduce shrimp to the water below the plant roots in order to further maximize the efficiency of the system.

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Aquaponics in Egypt (5 of 14)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
23 Jun 2013

While the idea of aquaponics is relatively new, a large appeal is that the cost of start up is relatively inexpensive, and materials are commonly found within the city. Given the ease of setup, proponents of the system hope there will be widespread adoption in the near future.

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Aquaponics in Egypt (4 of 14)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
23 Jun 2013

The initial yield of lettuce and other vegetables has been small, given the size of the farm. However, the two young farmers are already supplying two local restaurants and a small farmer's market held each Saturday in Cairo's upscale Zamalek.

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Aquaponics in Egypt (3 of 14)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
23 Jun 2013

A steady hum of generators filtering the water for the many fish tanks envelops a worker feeding the fish. The farm is producing Nile tilapia roughly 500 grams in weight, with plans to grow them larger in the near future.

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Aquaponics in Egypt (2 of 14)
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
23 Jun 2013

A small olive grove provides an entrance to the farming area. While certain plants can grow in the desert climate, the farm is also able to produce cucumber, basil, lettuce, kale, peppers and tomatoes in the arid climate.