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Toxic Waste Trade 14
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

An archive photo belonging to a former worker at S.D.R. Biotec in Pohritzsch shows how highly poisonous rubbish was simply mixed with sludge and other substances and relabeled.

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Toxic Waste Trade 15
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

An 68 year-old inhabitant of Pohritzsch has always been against the plant since she came to the area in 1995. She remembers how the trucks passing through came from everywhere: from France, Italy, Switzerland, Belarus. Her cats died, and she remembers that many dogs in Pohritzsch and the small town Brehna died as well. Samples from the soil in the area contained many heavy metals - including uranium.

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Toxic Waste Trade 17
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

A watchdog stands guard at S.D.R. Biotec in Pohritzsch.

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Toxic Waste Trade 18
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

An archive photo belonging to a former worker at S.D.R. Biotec in Pohritzsch shows how highly poisonous rubbish was simply mixed with sludge and other substances and relabeled.

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Toxic Waste Trade 20
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

An inhabitant of Brehna, a small town next to Pohritzsch, has lived in the area since 1960. In the former GDR he worked in power stations like Jänschwalde, Vetschau and Lübbenau. He remembers the abominable smell in Brehna when S.D.R. Biotec operated. But he says in the former GDR, the smell from the chemical factories in Bitterfeld was much worse.

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Toxic Waste Trade 21
Friedewald, Germany
By Isabell Zipfel
25 Nov 2014

The BMG/SVG Naundorf "waste treatment plant" received over 40,000 tons of dangerous waste from the central Cröbern dump. There is to this day no trace the toxic waste said to have been re-routed there.

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Jharia Coal Fire 03
Jharia
By Sanjay Pandey
24 Nov 2014

Smoke comes out of a drain along the main road in Jharia, hinting at the alarming levels of underground fires in area. A few years ago, fires damaged the Jharia railway station, leading to its eventual closure.

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Jharia Coal Fire 16
Jharia
By Sanjay Pandey
24 Nov 2014

People pilfer coal from state-run mines in Jharia.

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Tsunami 13
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
23 Nov 2014

After the 2004 tsunami, around 100 people were evicted from the village by a company that has plans to build a tourist resort in the area. Most of them were relocated a few kilometers away.

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Jharia Coal Fire 14
Jharia
By Sanjay Pandey
23 Nov 2014

A boy carrying a heavy load of coal over his head in Jharia. Many local children are forced to work pilfering coal from state-owned mines in the area.

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Jharia Coal Fire 21
Jharia
By Sanjay Pandey
23 Nov 2014

Children play in the streets of Belgharia, a township that has been set to up accommodate residents of Jharia displaced by the fire.

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Tsunami 01
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

Baan Nai Rai village is one of many Thai villages hit by the tsunami in 2004. The surrounding mangroves notably reduced the impact of the waves on the area. Now villagers are trying to protect the area from turning into a tourist resort.

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Tsunami 03
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A local fisherman comes back to shore after a day working at sea in Baan Nai Rai village, one of the Thai villages hit by the tsunami in 2004. The area is a mangrove forest that has been targeted by a company that wants to turn it into a tourist resort.

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Tsunami 04
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

Fish farms set up in the lagoon near Baan Nai Rai are one of the villages principal sources of food and income.

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Tsunami 07
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A dog takes watches over one of the fish farms at Baan Nai Rai village.

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Tsunami 08
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A child waits for fishermen to come back on shore at Baan Nai Rai village.

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Tsunami 10
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A styrofoam box is filled with the day's catch of a group of local fishermen.

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Tsunami 12
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A woman waits with her two children near the shore for the fishermen to return so she can start her working routine cleaning and processing the fish.

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Tsunami 14
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

The Baan Nai Rai cemetery, located just a few meters from the sea shore, is among the most important sites for the people in the village, since their ancestors rest there. The cemetary is among the sites under threat by the tourist project.

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Tsunami 02
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

A tsunami hazard sign stands in warning at the entrance of the Muslim village of Baan Nai Rai.

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Tsunami 11
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

Narong Sawangsup, 48, stands at the door of his new house with his 9 year-old daughter. The house was built by the company that evicted him from Baan Nai Rai village eight years ago.

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Thai Tsunami Survivors Face Eviction ...
Phuket
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

When a tsunami ravaged the shores of the Indian Ocean in 2004, the mangrove forest surrounding the Muslim village of Baan Nai Rai, in the province of Phang-Nga, saved most of its inhabitants even if it was one of the hardest hit areas in Thailand. Few months later, a company claimed the land where they have always lived and now plans to turn the area into a tourist resort. More than 100 people have already been displaced and 600 resist to be moved. But, above all, villagers want to protect the mangrove forest, an area that, according to Thai law, should be considered public land.

“I mainly fight for the mangrove area”, says Anun Poung Sa Nguan, a 54 year-old fisherman who has lived in the village for 30 years. “Without the mangroves, we would have to go too far away to catch the fish, because now they grow here."

“We worked very hard to take care of the mangroves, even before the tsunami," says Duk, one of the leaders of the village. We depend on them."

According to a research published by the Prince of Songkla University, the Baan Nai Rai community played a key factor in the reforestation, cultivation, protection and rehabilitation of the post-tsunami mangrove forest. Mangroves are considered an important factor for climate change adaptation and mitigation in coastal areas, especially in poor communities.

The villagers filed a lawsuit against the company but a tribunal considered in 2013 that the land was rightfully belonging to the company.

“I think this [property] document has been wrongfully obtained. This land should be public according to the law”, says Suttipong Laithip, a volunteer lawyer who is helping the villagers with the legal procedures against the company.

The Baan Nai Rai community is now trying to find additional evidences to bring again the case in court. After the 2004 tsunami, that killed more than 220.000 people in a dozen countries – 8000 of them in Thailand - the tourism sector has rapidly grown in the Phang-Nga province, where at least 14 villages were engaged in land and tenure disputes with the government and private companies one year after the disaster, according to a report from Human Rights Watch.

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Tsunami 15
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
22 Nov 2014

Fisherman return late in the evening to Baan Nai Rai after a day's work.

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Tsunami 05
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
21 Nov 2014

A woman pushes her boat to the shore at the end of the day in Baan Nai Rai village, one of the Thai villages hit by the tsunami in 2004.

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Tsunami 06
Phuket, Thailand
By vincenzo floramo
21 Nov 2014

Small fish is processed to produce food for larger fish that are raised in enclosed farms at Baan Nai Rai village.

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Fleeing Nature 1
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
19 Nov 2014

A homeless climate refugee sleeps in a park at Dhaka. The Bangladeshi capital is one of the most densely populated cities on earth. One of the major contributing factors to this swell in population is the mass migration of people from the impoverished countryside into the city. Many of those leaving the countryside fled after losing homes, crops, and livelihoods to natural catastrophes.

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Climate change bangladesh 02
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Oct 2014

Waste chemicals and oil from factories are disposed of in the canals, polluting the river and the soil. Industrial processes are not only a factor in climate change, but also produce toxic waste that threatens Dhaka's natural resources.

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Climate change bangladesh 03
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Oct 2014

A boy poses before a patch of cracked dry earth. Bangladesh has been particularly affected by climate change, where unpredictable heat waves and rainy seasons make life difficult for its people.

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Petroli No!
Palma de Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
12 Oct 2014

In 2014, the citizens of a small group of Mediterranean islands stood up against a powerful oil prospection company. The seismic testing and fracking planned not only could jeapordise the natural habitat of the Balearic Islands, but also the tourism model that economically sustains many residents. What began as the rebel actions of a few, soon became a full scale battle. The result of the battle remains uncertain, yet what is clear is that the fight of Balears Diu No! continues.

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Fleeing Nature 6
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Mohammad Rashid Miah cut down all of the trees around his house on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. Having already lost his house to the river, Mr. Miah is salvaging his trees in order to sell them and save enough money to move to Dhaka.

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Fleeing Nature 8
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Rubel stands in front of his uprooted coconut trees on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. After loosing his cow to river bank erosion, these coconut trees were his last source of livelihood. However, these trees have now also fallen victim to the river.

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Fleeing Nature 12
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Rabeya Khatun mourns her lost husband and son on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. Her husband and son lost their lives when their house was swallowed by the river as they slept. Rabeya was at her mother's house when the incident occurred and thus survived.

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Fleeing Nature 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Mohammad Ikram stands in front of the Meghna river, near Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. He has seen his neighbors migrating and even dying because of water related disasters. Despite strong signals that it is best to leave the area, he does not know what to do because his land is all he has.

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Honduras' Blood Lobsters
Kawkira
By Carsten Snejbjerg
08 Oct 2014

On the outermost point of Honduras’ peninsula between the Caratasca lagoon and the Caribbean Ocean, lies the small town Kawkira. It is there, in the most far-out areas of Honduras, that the Misquito Indians have lived off of lobster diving for decades. Today, America’s growing demand for the sea creatures causes them to dive deeper and more often. Many risk their lives diving only with the most basic and outdated equipment.

With no roads leading to Kawkira, the only method of access is by boat. Taywar Thomson lives here with his family of eight. At 23 years of age, Taywar is a diver just like his father Don Moises was before a diving accident left him permanently handicapped at the age of 60. Despite his father’s accident and the many accidents he has experienced himself, the lack of other ways to make a living forces Taywar back to the diving boats day after day.

Like many others, Taywar has suffered from decompression sickness and gets intermittent shooting pains in his shoulder. He has run out of air 35 meters under the surface several times, dropping his catch to resurface without any decompression. This maneuver is known to be highly dangerous and even deadly in the diving world, where surfacing without decompression is normally strictly forbidden if divers are deeper than 18 meters. With 35 lobster boats, Honduras has the biggest fleet in the region, each boat holding dozens of divers and often exceeding their capacity. Also boarding the boats are personal helpers, called a cayoqueros, who look out for bubbles and follow the divers into the open sea.

Lobster divers often leave on expeditions of up to 14 days, using between 12 to 20 tanks a day and diving as deep as 50 meters at times. The combination of such deep and frequent dives is a sharp aberration from normal diving procedure. Most dive without any safety equipment and can experience jammed regulators while under water, while others, like Taywar, suffer from decompression sickness leading to daily joint pain and difficulty breathing. Diving is even more dangerous for a population where drug and marijuana use is on the rise. At least 23 divers died in 2013, while about 1500 divers have been handicapped in recent years.

Despite such hazards, these men continually venture out to sea to earn approximately seven dollars per kilo of lobster. However, they are only paid for the weight of the tails. 90% of the lobsters are exported to the USA, where demand continues to increase.

Part of a Central America-wide agreement, lobster diving was banned in 2013. Though Honduras was one of the countries that agreed on paper, 75 % of the economy on the north coast still thrives off of lobster diving.

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Fleeing Nature 2
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
03 Oct 2014

Sadarghat Launch Terminal, situated on the bank of the river Buriganga in Dhaka, is one of the busiest places in Bangladesh. Most people migrating from the countryside pass through this port to migrate to Dhaka. Many of those migrating are climate refugees.

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Fleeing Nature 4
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Shahjahan transports tin sheets and other materials from his house. Some families actually migrate before disaster strikes so they do not lose all of their belongings in an impending disaster. Mohammad deconstructed his entire house and moved it elsewhere before it was destroyed by the water.

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Fleeing Nature 5
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Mamun stands over his submerged house in the Padma River in Dohar, Dhaka. Mr. Mamun's house was swallowed by the Padma after river bank erosion resulted in a land implosion.

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Fleeing Nature 7
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Romjal Ali takes a selfie with his destroyed house. Mr. Ali's house was destroyed by the eroding river bank. Dohar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

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Fleeing Nature 9
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Rabeya Begum stands over the roof of her house which she salvaged after it was destroyed by river bank erosion. She is going to use the salvaged materials to build her new home. Dohar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

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Fleeing Nature 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Khadija Akhter was only able to save this cabinet and some bricks from her house after river bank erosion resulted in her house being destroyed and submerged. Dohar, Dhaka.