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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 01
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

People from the community of Petare, one of Latin America's largest slums, take part in the Via Crucis organized by the parishioners of the "El Nazareno" sector in one of Caracas' poorest districts.

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 02
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

A participant in the Via Crucis, a local kid from the community, plays the role of the centurion for the audience.

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 03
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

Two young women play Mary and Magdalena, watching onward as Jesus is tortured.

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 04
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

Though time it's Christ who's lying on the streets of Petare, most days it's someone else - the daily victims of local crime.

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 05
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

At the scene of Jesus' torture, a priest is stained by representations of his blood.

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 06
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

Mary at the stage cleaning the scene of the torture of Jesus

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 08
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

The scene of the Via Crucis when Jesus gets a crown of thorns

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 09
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

Petare's Via Crucis is as realistic as possible, without really harming the actors looks stunishing and real

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 10
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

The people of Petare as they walk from the Nazareno sector to El Morro, where the Via Crucis ends

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 11
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

Some People choose their roofs to have a better view of the Via Crucis without having to struggle for a place among the people

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 12
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

Over the streets between the Nazareno sector and El Morro goes the Via Crucis having Petare as a stage.

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 13
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

The representation is so cruel that this little girl started to cry

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 14
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

Petare, the biggest slum in Latin America covers the east side of Caracas

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 15
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

The people of the comunity at the final point of the Via Crucis.

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 16
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

One of the two thievs who were crucified with Jesus about to play the final scene

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 17
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

The actors of the centurions also guard the people so they don't get in the stage

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 18
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

one of the two thievs who were crucified with Jesus after he's mounted in his cross

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 19
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

The other actors help secure the other thief to his cross

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 20
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

Jesus as he plays the final scene of the Via Crucis

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 22
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

The three crosses as the final scene of the via crucis is played.

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 23
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

a Centurion guards the entrance of the stage so no one gets in and everyone in the audience can see the play

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EASTER IN THE FAVELA 25
Caracas, Venezuela
By Mariana Vincenti
02 Apr 2015

The Via Crucis seen from the low part of El Morro, at the top of one of the mountains of Petare.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 26
Montevideo, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
05 Feb 2014

Women escaping domestic violence, drug addiction and crime in a shelter and rehab center in Montevideo make dust rags. Domestic violence is widespread across Latin America including in this small, mostly rural country with an average of 68 reports of gender based violence made daily in Montevideo.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 27
Montevideo, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
05 Feb 2014

Stella, 32, comes from the Uruguayan countryside (Tacuarembo area). She and her autistic son were beaten and abused by her husband for 4 years. Since her husband was jailed for attempting to kill her, Stella lives with her son in a shelter for women escaping violence and addiction.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 28
Maldonado, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
26 Jan 2014

Franco (18) and Helena Maria (2) came from poor rural families to be adopted by Daniel M. (52) and Walter MA (38), activists in the LGBT community who have been adopting underprivileged children at the biological parents' behest.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 29
Maldonado, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
26 Jan 2014

Daniel M. (52) and Walter MA (38) have the biggest homosexual family in Latin America. After 20 years as a couple, they have adopted four children: Franco, Mayara, Maria Pia and Helena Maria. The children arrived from poor families where they couldn't survive. In these last 20 years, desperate mothers have asked to Walter and Daniel to adopt their children. "They're not Desaparecidos!" Daniel says, "they have constant contact with their biological families". Daniel and Walter have been active in the LGBT community in Latin America for 25 years. Today, adoption by same-sex couples is legal in 16 countries, including Uruguay.

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Children of the guaranà 01
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

The SaterŽ-MawŽ tribe lives in the region of the mid Amazon River, on the border between Amazonas and Par‡ states. Inventors of the "Guaran‡ culture", the tribe domesticated this wild fruit and created its processing method, thanks to which Guaran‡ is known and consumed all over the world.

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Children of the guaranà 02
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

Known as to locals as "the Children of Guaran‡" the Satere-Mawe indians still maintain their traditional way of planting and using guaran‡, for example as medicine or their ritual drink.

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Children of the guaranà 04
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

Pedro, 33, a SaterŽ-MawŽ indian who patrols the forest: "Illegal logging can be hard to tackle. Logging happens deep in the forest, far from the eyes of the world but GPS tracking technology and satellite surveillance means we can find out where loggers are and what kind of timber they want. We are tracking 560 hectares of virgin forest with new technologies, hopefully we will stop illegal logging here."

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Children of the guaranà 12
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
27 Mar 2013

Kennedy, 24, defends his land from illegal timber extraction. He is part of an international project with local partners. This project in the Satere-MawŽ area was created to support the local communities and to prevent illegal timber extraction by increasing daily surveillance, mapping forest resources and through a series of initiatives to raise awareness and environmental education. Indigenous and other local forest communities have seen their land seized, their lifestyles destroyed, and their livelihoods stolen. The US is the largest market for timber exported from Brazil. While Americans buy massive quantities of wood, often taken illegally from forests, to construct floors, outdoor paths, and piers, local people and activists working to protect the Amazon are being assassinated and kept quiet through intimidation.

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Children of the guaranà 03
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
26 Mar 2013

The Andir‡ river by night. The SaterŽ-MawŽ live in the region of the mid Amazon River, on the border between Brazil's two biggest states Amazonas and Par‡.

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Children of the guaranà 05
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
26 Mar 2013

It's a long trip to reach the SaterŽ-MawŽ reserve: one hour flight from Manaus to Parintins, the closest city, then an 8 hour trip by riverboat.

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Children of the guaranà 18
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
24 Mar 2013

Every year since 1995, residents of Guaranatuba village and some communities and volunteers from NGOs gather to celebrate the harvest of guaran‡ fruit, known worldwide for its high energy value. During two days of celebration, locals enjoy small performances by folks artists and musical performances to mark the event.

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Children of the guaranà 20
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
24 Mar 2013

A MawŽ girl listens intently to a speech about indigenous rights and the fair trade economy.

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Children of the guaranà 16
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
24 Mar 2013

A MawŽ woman prepares food and a guaran‡ drink at home. Guaran‡ is the daily, ritual and religious beverage, and it is drunk in large quantities by adults and children alike.

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Children of the guaranà 15
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

The areas where the SaterŽ-MawŽ live are called "s’tio". In this space each family unit has its residence, where a fire is lit both for cooking and for keeping the residents warm (the fire also serves to congregate the family members around it).

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Children of the guaranà 17
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

Guaranatuba village, located alongside of the Andira riverbank. Two young SaterŽ-MawŽ are preparing a powerful sound system for a guaran‡ harvest festival that hosts music, traditional dance and speeches about indigenous culture and politics.

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Children of the guaranà 22
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

A current project underway in the SaterŽ-MawŽ region involves the mapping of forest resources, the construction of a small nursery to produce 5,000 seedlings per year, making plans for the correct use of natural resources, training in techniques of forestry, collection of seeds and production of seedlings, Copaiba oil and Guarana powder.