Thumb sm
I'm Africa
Prov. du Katanga
By Gabriele Orlini
08 Sep 2017

You are confusing the circulatory system with this maze of meandering, twisted like cells of the brain – wire meshes and tangles, resemble memory – each with a story to hide or to be dissolved, there just behind a gauze suspended between the face and the hanging ceiling, hanging between the faces and walls.
You do not know if they are roots or hair those that sink in water, and in the sky – in the sky from where the water is more than any imagined Africa.

The sky of thick foliage, of dry logs as your crosses and you do not know if they are branches or knots of hair braiding those who see blacks under the smoky clouds. There are more signs on the ground and more signs on the water that on the blackboard, which does not pass the history of your steps, but one of the steps of foreigners on your land.

A whirlpool in the lazy river as you sleep. A run in the tall grass, cutting edges. A jump and a heavy bag on your head, the water reflects other water and the tree grows from your shoulders, soon broken up by life that your father has left the crooked stick.

This is a Story
As every story, it’s made by Moments, Instants, People, Places.
Different but indissolubly tied together by invisible and indivisible light threads.
It’s not a tale of Africa but it’s a story of Men, or of a single Man.
It’s the tale of a centuries-old Tree with its roots - the wrinkled and strong arms of an old lady- searching for life in the depths of the river.
It’s the story of a Woman who stretches the same roots to the sky as if to contrast a law of nature.

In Africa there’s nothing that doesn’t come into being from the earth and nothing that’s not raised towards the sky that dominates everything.
It’s the tale of a River that flows for thousands of years in a land that’s fighting for his identity for a thousands of years.
It’s the same River that carries along life and death, the end and the beginning. 
A River able to nurture, a River able to kill.

It’s the tale of many Men leaving in search of something that doesn’t have a name yet.

It’s the tale of a Color in which all the colors are alike, the story of an escape towards places so far away, drawn in a map by Red Soil and where all the paths come together.

It’s the tale of a Red Soil that stains your feet and goes inside you
It goes deep into your blood and fires it up.

And it’s useless to wash your body in the river at the end of the day: the Red Soil has left a mark on everything you have and everything you are. 
It’s the tale of a Disease without a cure.
It’s the tale of a Rain that comes from the silence of a blue sky and with a din fills the buckets of the village.
It’s the tale of many other Tales.
It's the story of those who live and consume that Land.
It’s the story of who has being worn out by that Land.
And it’s also the tale of a Mondele, a White Man.
A tale of the moment in which he asked to himself: “What if I was born here?
And then he understood the only possible answer: “I am Africa”.

 

Thumb sm
Belfast: Where the Walls Speak
Belfast, Northern Ireland
By Fabio Polese
27 Dec 2014

Strolling through the ravines of cities like Belfast, in those hearths of belonging marked by barbed wire, murals celebrating local identity and waking flags speak to a past that continues to exert is presence on the everyday. The divisions between the Republican and Protestant communities are still deep, beyond the attempts at reconciliation have occurred over the years by members of the political institutions in Northern Ireland. Around here the time is marked by commemorations and celebrations, events that enliven the mind and strengthen the concept of identity. On the walls, the windows of fast food restaurants, inside the pubs, one may notice small posters affixed to convene the community to participate in a garrison rather than a procession to commemorate some topical event in local history or the sacrifice of a martyr to his cause. And so even the walls speak. They tell stories and consolidate memory. "The murals are used to transmit our historical legacy," says Jack Duffin, a former member of the Official Irish Republican Army (IRA). The Offical IRA came out of a split in the IRA that lead to the formation of two groups. The more nationalist group took on the name Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA), while the Official IRA was often referred to as the ‘Red IRA’ or the ‘Marxist IRA.’ Duffin now works as a tour guide at the "Coiste Irish Political Tours,” an agency that organizes walking tours for tourists explaining the violence that their land has suffered. "Trading the past means transmitting our historical legacy to all people of the world who visit Belfast,” Duffin says, drinking his cup of black coffee on the way to Culturlann, a structure that works to promote the Gaelic language and culture located in the district nationalist Falls Road, Belfast. "I do not regret my past, I still want an Ireland free and sovereign. An Ireland free from the British and the European Union, but without violence. That's what we try to teach our young people.” "Many young people today are much less interested in the situation,” says Sean McHugh, a forty-year-old nationalist born and raised in Ardoyne, who lived through clashes between Irish Republicans and supporters of the Queen in the nineties. “They are estranged from reality by television, by drugs and alcohol. In the nineties there was a lot more anger and tension than there is today." This tension does not seem to have vanished completely and could re-ignite at any moment. In fact, according to informed sources, there are 200 to 500 volunteers for the New IRA in Belfast alone. The New IRA has been training a new cadre of Irish Republican Army since they were formed in 2012 by merging several active paramilitary cells. Despite this presence, local associations and political parties continue desire a peaceful way forward to achieve a free and sovereign Ireland.

Thumb sm
Albinism in Tanzania 03
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
23 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 23, 2014 - Sista Laurentina Bukombe doing a skin check-up during the trimestral meeting. She is a nun graduated in dermatology who is collaborating with Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre and Tulime Association, providing albinos with sunscreen lotion, medical check-ups and proper treatment if needed. In this area there had never been killings, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun.

Thumb sm
Albinism in Tanzania 02
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
21 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 21, 2014 - Alufema mends a carpet. She is one of the persons with albinism of the Kilolo District censed by the Tulime Association. There have never been killings in this area, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun. The census was fundamental in order to be able to help the albinos of the area with sunscreen cream and medical check-ups. The national census does not provide correct and actual data about albinism.

Thumb sm
Albinism in Tanzania 07
Ilula, Iringa
By Federico Roscioli
21 Jul 2014

Ilula, Tanzania, July 21, 2014 - Angela with one of her four children, none of whom have albinism. She is one of the persons with albinism of the Kilolo District censed by Tulime Association. There have never been killings in this area, so the first enemy of albinos is the sun. The census was fundamental in order to be able to help the albinos of the area with sunscreen cream and medical check-up. The national census does not provide correct and actual data about albinism.

Thumb sm
Sacrifice and Salvation: Albinism in ...
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
13 Jul 2014

“I was pretending to be asleep, but I saw them cutting her throat and drinking her blood, and then cutting her arms and legs…” These are the words of Mmindi, recalling the night in December 2008 when her 5-year-old sister, Mariam, was murdered in front of her.

Mariam had albinism. In the inner regions of Sub-Saharian Africa people with albinism have a very hard life. Not only do they need to fight against the cancer-causing rays of the harsh tropical sun, but they must also fight stigma and discrimination. Myths and stigmas about Albinos sometimes have horrific results. For examlpe, in recent years, traditional medicine has furthered the belief that albino body parts have elements with magical powers that give success and fortune. This myth has resulted in brutal killings of albinos with the aim of harvesting their body parts. Mariam was a victim of such an attack.

Another major struggle for albinos is protecting themselves from the sun. Those living in areas with little access to health care also struggle to protect themselves from the sun and treat problems arising from UV exposure. 

From the Lake Victoria region, where killings and discrimination still infringe upon these people's human rights, to the Iringa region tormented with an absence of healthcare, albinos in Tanzania are increasingly at risk as of late. The lack of proper information about albinism, in a country in which 1 out of 2.000 people is albino (in Europe and North America the ratio is 1 out of 20.000), leaves the doors to discrimination wide open. For these people, the Tanzanian government has never been able to guarantee health, education or security. Only through the help of N.G.O.s like Under The Same Sun and Tulime does a bright future seem possible for the albinos.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

Thumb sm
Albinism in Tanzania 08
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
10 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 10, 2014 - Before a race during sports day in Lake View School, Mwanza, Tanzania. albinos play sports early in the morning to avoid exposure to the hot sun.

Thumb sm
Albinism in Tanzania 04
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

Thumb sm
Albinism in Tanzania 05
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

Thumb sm
Albinism in Tanzania 06
Mwanza
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Mwanza, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Jelly's Primary School in Mwanza. In this school Under The Same Sun (UTSS) is the full sponsor for 36 children. This allows them to study in a normal mixed school instead of centers for persons with sight disabilities. In Tanzania albinos are considered disabled, but they just might have sight problems.

Thumb sm
Albinism in Tanzania 09
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Masalu, 18 years old is both deaf and mute. She arrived with her two siblings at the Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania, after the last killing of an albino that took place in May 2014. She became pregnant after being raped. The center was the immediate answer by the government to the killings of albinos that started in 2007 in the lake area. Nowadays around 200 people of all ages are living in this center together.

Thumb sm
Albinism in Tanzania 10
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - A child dozes off in Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania. The center is defined as a school, but it hosts 200 people of all ages assisted by two teachers and living in precarious conditions.

Thumb sm
Albinism in Tanzania 01
Shinyanga
By Federico Roscioli
08 Jul 2014

Shinyanga, Tanzania, July 8, 2014 - Courtyard of Buhangija Center for persons with sight disabilities in Shinyanga, Tanzania. The center was the immediate answer of the government to the killings of albinos that started in 2007 in the lake area. Nowadays around 200 people of all ages are living in this center together.

Thumb sm
The Peaceful Revolution, Bulgaria
Sofia, Bulgaria
By Mais Istanbuli
28 Jun 2013

Thousands of mainly younger, well-educated Bulgarians have been rallying in Sofia and other cities since June 14 to demand the resignation of the Socialist-led cabinet, shouting “Resignation” (‘Ostavka’) and “Mafia" in the streets. There have been up to 30,000 daily in Sofia alone.

The demonstrations have been primarily organized through Facebook. What prompted these protests was the election of Delyan Peevski as the head of the State Agency of National Security. Participants in the rally against Plamen Oresharski’s cabinet protest openly against his media, which have been accused by the majority of the public of presenting the procession in his benefit. Peevski is also allegedly connected with bank circles that influence the making of political decisions.

Because of the scandal involving the appointment of Peevski as the head of the State Agency of National Security, the president Rosen Plevneliev announced that he no longer trusts the “Oresharski” cabinet. Even after the removal of Delyan Peevski, the protests have continued, demanding the government’s resignation.

Thumb sm
Kenya Grandmother's Survival
Nairobi, Kenya
By Mais Istanbuli
28 May 2013

Wairimu Gachenga, 70, lives in the notorious Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. She looks after her grandchildren, 19 year old Wahome Njeriand and 17 year old Wairimu Njeriafter, after their mother died from HIV. In order to make ends meet, she travels to the Dandora dumpsite to collect plastic and other recyclable material which she then sells. On a weekly basis, she receives some cabbage and other plant material from a church in the area that she uses to feed her family.
Gachenga regularly joins a group of grandmothers from the area who get together to practice self-defense techniques, after one of the natives was raped in 2007. Elderly women in Kenya are increasingly suffering from sexual assault, since many believe that they have a lower risk of catching HIV compared to younger women. In response to this problem, the group is also part of a support group for the women, where they swap stories and ensure each other's safety. When one of the women doesn't attend a meeting, the rest of the group suspects that she is in danger. Gachenga, like many other women in her condition, has resorted to communal means to secure her livelihood, where the weekly meetings act as a safe haven for those in need of help.

Thumb sm
Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (34 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

Seventy year old Wairimu Gachenga practice self defence techniques with other grandmothers 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. Once a week a group of grandmothers from the area get together to practice self defence techniques after one of them were raped in 2007. KAREL PRINSLOO.

Thumb sm
Kenyan Grandmothers' Survival (10 of 34)
Nairobi, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
10 May 2013

A grandmother practice self defence techniques with other grandmothers 10 May 2013 in the Nairobi slum of Korogocho, Kenya. KAREL PRINSLOO.

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (24 of 25)
Marrakesh, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
07 Mar 2013

Marrocco on the two wheels. This tousled, exotic world is often like a surreal dream.

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (23 of 25)
Essaouira, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
02 Mar 2013

A car, a motorbike, a bicycle? Bikes are increasingly popular amongst young Moroccans.

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (19 of 25)
Essaouira, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
02 Mar 2013

It used to be donkeys laden with boxes and baskets of merchandise.

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (17 of 25)
Essaouira, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
02 Mar 2013

Cycling can be the best and fastest means of transport, both in the countryside and in the city.

Thumb sm
Saisei: Coming To Life
Tokyo, Japan
By U.S. Editor
28 Feb 2013

"Saisei" means to come to life again and to recover through time. In Japan, the annual number of suicides has exceeded 30,000. By prefecture, Tokyo had the most suicides, at 3,100. Furthermore, the annual number of people who attempted suicide is said to be the 10 times. This serious number can clearly represent the tough and difficult social life of Japan. However, this ridiculous number does not appeal any individuals’ struggles behind their real dramas. I am following two parsons who attempted suicide to tell their stories through their cases and look at the meaning of living in this society.

" I still wonder why I am alive here."

Taka Fukushima, 43 years old who quietly decided to kill himself three years ago because he had been suffered from depression and asthma due to stress of work for long time. Then, he hung himself with a thick rope which he had for his hobby, canoeing. As soon as he was found by his grand-father in his room, he was sent to the emergency hospital with his heart stopped beating. The doctor said he would be left with a severe after effect, although he might come arrive. After two weeks, everyone thought it was a miracle when he opened his eyes again and he even did not show much permanent damage. He spent a month in the hospital and took a break for a year. Luckily enough, he has found himself a job in the design industry and decided to return to the society. However, he said that it is not so easy to live again in this society for him because Japanese society tends to not accept people who dropped out even once. Now he is working hard without telling anyone his past of attempting suicide. He said, "I do my best a little more as it is. I feel that I was saved by invisible some kind of will, so I must live".

"I was saved by my child."

Emi Asai, 35 years old has been suffering from depression and panic disorder which caused by a stress of work when she was 21 years old. One day five years ago, she made up in a face neatly and changed into a dress she loved and wrote a will at her room, then she intended to die and took medicine more than 300 tablets. Fortunately, she was found by her husband and was done gastric irrigation immediately at a hospital and escaped death. One year after she leaving a hospital, she became pregnant and a baby has made her get hope to live again. She said, "I still has been suffering from mental disorder and sometime I can not control myself. If I has not been given a child, I would commit suicide again. As far as there is my child, I must live for her". Now she helps her husband's company and studies to get a license of psychology counselor.

In 2012, the number of suicide fell below 30,000 for the first time in 15 years. However it is still high number throughout the world. There are about 300,000 people who attempted suicide in Japan and they are struggling to live like them I have covered.

Thumb sm
Morocco on two wheels
Morocco
By Mais Istanbuli
28 Feb 2013

What places, what parts of the world come straight to mind when you think of bicycles and cycling? Our minds drift almost automatically towards the Netherlands, especially Amsterdam, and maybe alsoDenmark. Well, certainly not towards the Arabic world. Traditionally there is no “cycling culture” there, bikes have a rather negative image and are not socially accepted, especially amongst women. But then there is Morocco. Morocco is teeming with bicycles. Older and poorer Moroccans cycle because it is a cheap means of transport. Young people cycle because it is cool. Women cycle because it is practical. Quite rapidly cycling is becoming an inherent part of the local culture. People cycle to work, to school, to run errands, for pleasure. Somehow even cycling in long traditional djellabas is not an issue, even though at first it seems to be verging on impossible. Bikes are everywhere. Everybody uses them. Bike workshops pop up on every corner. Morocco is on two wheels.
Text written by: Anna Blasiak

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (9 of 25)
Taroudant, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
28 Feb 2013

Markets are filled with smells of steaming mint tea, the spices, freshly baked pastries, meat from butcher shops, rotting vegetables.

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (21 of 25)
Igli Sidi Hamed, Morrocco
By Martushka Fromeast
27 Feb 2013

Two frail Davids versus a huge Goliath. You can cram a lot on a bike too.

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (22 of 25)
Taroudant, Morrocco
By Martushka Fromeast
27 Feb 2013

What do you do when you run out of eggs while cooking a traditional Kefta Mkaouara? Well, you grab your own egg carton, hop on a faithful bike and go stock up, of course.

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (16 of 25)
Taroudant, Morrocco
By Martushka Fromeast
27 Feb 2013

Bikes (and people) have a meeting place in a city square. What are they waiting for?

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (15 of 25)
Taroudant, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
27 Feb 2013

Will they carry shopping home in the qobs of their djellabas or will they use the back rack of the bike?

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (14 of 25)
Taroudant, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
27 Feb 2013

Cycling bridges generations of women. How do you bicycle in a long djellaba?

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (8 of 25)
Taroudant, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
27 Feb 2013

Red fezzes, scarves, veils and bare heads, long djellabas and jeans, hoodies and tailored shirts, leather slippers and trainers, donkeys and bikes – they all meet at the market.

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (6 of 25)
Taroudant, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
27 Feb 2013

In Morocco everybody cycles: men and women, young and old.