Thumb sm
Wedding in Palestine
Bethlehem
By Andrea Falletta
23 Mar 2017

Wedding in Bethlehem, West Bank, Palestine, a young couple get married in a traditional way in Palestine territory.

Frame 0004
Child Labour in Our World
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
11 Jun 2015

It may sound like old news to some, but one of the scary realities of our world is that some of the biggest problems facing humanity occur without explosions, protests, or big news headlines. Often, those who suffer the most suffer in silence, far away from the eyes of news cameras and the international community.

Child Labour is one of those problems that passes largely unnoticed. All over the world, across cultural, social, and religious divides, child labour persists. Sometimes it occurs as the simple act of a well-intended parent taking their child to work in the farm fields by their side. Other times, it is malicious factory owners using children as cheap labour in their factory, where they are abused and underpaid.

What makes the issue more complicated is that child labour can occur in front of our eyes, without us noticing. Sometimes understanding child labour is understanding what is not visible to us. It is understanding that a working child is not attending school, that a working child is malnourished, and that a working child is physically and psychologically abused. The difference between a child helping their mother in the family shop and child exploitation could be the simple question of whether or not the child’s work is preventing them from attending school. The line can sometimes be fine and other times glaring.

At Transterra Media, our contributors have documented child labour around the world for years, from the brick factories of Bangladesh, to the garbage piles of Cambodia, and the car repair shops of Syria. Our contributors have shed a small amount of light on a massive issue that the world is still trying to address.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 01
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Mar 2015

Wanna today. Despite his disability, he is now is a Music teacher in the Phnom Penh Thmey School.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 11
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Mar 2015

Wanna teaching a class in the present day. Wanna's journey from a child who yearned for education, to now being a teacher is the success story that spurred the creation of schools for blind and deaf children in Cambodia.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 12
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Mar 2015

Wanna today with his team.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 17
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Mar 2015

Students at the Phnom Penh Thmey School.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 18
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Mar 2015

A Student at the Phnom Penh Thmey School.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 16
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Mar 2015

Students at the Phnom Penh Thmey School.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 15
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Mar 2015

Students at the Phnom Penh Thmey School.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 14
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Mar 2015

Students at the Phnom Penh Thmey school.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 19
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Mar 2015

A Student at the Phnom Penh Thmey School.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 20
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Mar 2015

Students at the Phnom Penh Thmey School.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 21
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
30 Mar 2015

Students at the Phnom Penh Thmey School.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 05
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
27 Mar 2015

Phot Wanna in 1993 being taught to read an braille book. Wanna, was the child who gave Benoît the inspiration to open the first school for blind children in Cambodia.

Photo by Krousar Thmeu.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 06
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
27 Mar 2015

Wanna 20 years later with Benoît (founder of Krousar Thmeu Foundation, back row, third from the right) and Australia actor Jack Thompson.

Photo by Krousar Thmeu

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 07
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
27 Mar 2015

Photo by Krousar Thmeu. Benoît Duchâteau-Arminjon and Phalla Neang. Benoît is the founder of NGO Krousar Thmey. He started in Thailand’s refugee camps over 20 years ago. In 1993, Phalla Neang and the NGO Krousar Thmey opened the first school for visually impaired pupils in Cambodia and Phalla became the very first Braille teacher in the country’s history. She also contributed to the development of the Khmer version of Braille.

Since 1997, Krousar Thmey, which is supported by LIGHT FOR THE WORLD (a European development federation), also provides education for deaf pupils. Today Phalla Neang serves as a teacher trainer, school director and as the coordinator of the national ‘Education for Blind’ program. The ‘Education for Blind’ program involves five schools for blind and deaf students, 72 integrated and inclusive classes in regular schools, and nationwide advocacy campaigns.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 10
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
27 Mar 2015

Phnom Penh Thmey School. This is the school where Phalla currently works. The program has now expanded to 69 teachers and 250 children in 4 Krousar Thmey schools. There are an additional 29 integrated classes in public schools across the country.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 09
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
27 Mar 2015

The Phnom Penh Thmey School.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 08
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
27 Mar 2015

The opening of the Phnom Penh Thmey School.

Photo by Krousar Thmey Foundation.

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 03
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
16 Mar 2015

In 1993, Phalla Neang opened the first school for blind children in Camboda. She was one of 10 finalists for the "Global Teacher Prize," an honor that awards $1 million to "the best teacher in the world."

Thumb sm
Blind children Cambodia 04
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Lola García-Ajofrín
16 Mar 2015

In 1993, Phalla Neang opened the first school for blind children in Camboda. She was one of 10 finalists for the "Global Teacher Prize," an honor that awards $1 million to "the best teacher in the world."

Frame 0004
Nowruz Camp: Refugees Who Fled ISIS L...
Dêrîk
By TTM Contributor 33
26 Jan 2015

Derik, Syria

January 26, 2015

More than 11,000 refugees live in miserable conditions in the Nowruz Camp in the outskirts of the Kurdish-majority city of Derik, also known as Malikia. This camp, set up more than a year ago, is run by the autonomous administration affiliated with the Democratic Union Party, known by the Kurdish acronym PYD.

Most Nowruz camp residents are Yezidi Kurds who fled the Shengal area in Iraq following an onslaught by ISIS. Other refugees are Arabs and Kurds who fled embattled areas in Syria.

This video includes interviews with Kurdish and Arab refugees as well as a camp administrator. Refugees complained of the lack adequate aid and the cold weather.

Shotlist

Various of tents
Various of children filling water from tank
Various of children
Various of tents and cooking utensils
Various of children standing in the mud
Various of refugee woman preparing food
Various of Sheikh Kkodr, camp administrator, talking to refugees

Soundbites

1 SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Young Boy), Unnamed Camp Resident

There is a lot of rain and we do not have kerosene to light the heaters. The heaters do not work. We demand urgent aid and that the roads inside the camp be covered with asphalt.

2 SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Man) Unnamed Yezidi Refugee

We faced storms and a harsh cold during this period. We did not have heaters or kerosene. Our tents were leaking. Our situation was very miserable. We want Shingal to be liberated so that this tragedy ends and we would be able to go back home.

3 SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Woman) Badia Khudr, Yezidi Refugee from Shingal, Iraq
We fled Shingal when ISIS arrived. We walked for several days, feeling hungry and thirsty, until we reached Mount Sinjar. The Kurdish People’s Protection Units moved us from the mountain to Rojava [Syrian part of Kurdistan]. We pray for them because they saved us from death. ISIS kidnapped many of our women and young men. Now, at the camp, we are suffering from the harsh cold. Our children are cold and falling sick. Our tents are flooded with water. ISIS kidnapped many of my relatives. There are no toilets, gas, kerosene or milk for children. Rojava has weak capacities, but we are thankful for the help they are providing.
At the camp, there are Arab refugees from Syria and Iraq. There are also Muslims and Yezidis. We all have good relations with each other. We visit, help and lend each other what we need. We hope that ISIS would be gone so that we return to our homes.

4 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ahmad Saadoun, Refugee from Aleppo

Q: What is your situation?

Our situation? We are doing fine.

We fled because of the war. We have been in Noroz camp for about eight months. We are receiving aid, but they are not enough. Heating is not good. These heaters do not provide enough warmth.

5 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Sheikh Khodr, an administrator of the camp

“The terrorist onslaught by ISIS inflicted the people of Sinjar, especially the Yezidis. We did not see any humanitarian aid. The Iraqi government should carry out its duties. The state, government and parliament should fulfil their duties. It should be a state with functioning institutions.

Frame 0004
"We Are Dying of the Cold": Syrian Re...
Qoub Elias
By Cherine Yazbeck
14 Jan 2015

Qoub Elias, Beqaa Lebanon

January 14, 2015

Syrian refugees in the town of Qoub Elias in eastern Lebanon say that their fragile tents collapsed under the snow during the recent storm that has hit Lebanon for the past week.
Dozens of malnourished children run in the snow wearing light clothes. Many of them only have plastic slippers to protect their feet from the icy ground.
Refugee camp residents in Qoub Elias, many of whom are unemployed, complained that the aid they are receiving is not enough to cover their needs.

Shot List
1. Wide of snow-covered hills and Beqaa Valley
2. Wide (pan right) of snow-covered plain
3. Various Syrian refugee children running and shouting NAT SOUND: (Arabic) “We want a school! We want a school!”
4. Traveling of children walking in the snow
5. Tilt down on children/ Close up of feet (wearing slippers) on snow
6. Traveling of child walking in snow/ entering tent
7. Medium of woman cooking outside a tent
8. Close up of woman cooking rice outside a tent
9. Wide of young girl carrying baby and children walking around and shoveling snow
10. Medium of young boy shoveling snow
11. Wide/ zoom in of children wearing slippers and no socks standing on the snow
12. Close up of girl’s feet in slippers stepping in the snow
13. Close up of Rawaa’s (young Syrian refugee girl) face
14. Wide of children standing next to tents
15. Medium/ close up of barefoot children
16. Wide of boy removing snow from top of tent. NAT SOUND (Arabic) Man to his boy: “Give it to him. Remove the snow. It is behind you.”

17 Wide of children throwing snow at each other

18 Various of refugees and World Vision staff taking supplies out of pickup truck

19 Various of refugees outside tents

Soundbites

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, boy) Syrian refugee, Moayyad al-Rasheed
01:06
Moayyad: There is no school.
Interviewer: What is there no school?
Moayyad: ah…
Interviewer: How long has it been that you have not gone to school?
Moayyad: It has been 10 years [children laugh]. I have not gone [to school]
Interviewer: Not even once?
Moayyad: Not even once.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Child) Syrian refugee, Moayyad al-Rasheed
01:59
Interviewer: Do you feel cold at night?
Child: Yes
Interviewer: Too cold?
Child: Yes

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Syrian refugee, Moayyad’s father, Mohammad al-Rasheed
02:06
Mohammad al-Rasheed: There are 19 people of us here in this tent.
Interviewer: How can you fit?
Mohammad al-Rasheed: What can we do? This crisis has done this to us. We burn wood, nylon and anything else to have heat. What can we do? This storm has affected us a lot. At night, you have to clear the tent’s roof every hour, otherwise it would collapse. During the storm, we have to do this every hour or two hours.
During the summer, I worked as a manual laborer, but there is no work in the winter. I am sitting around. God help us. We received aid a couple of days ago from a sheikh… ah… the imam of Al-Salam Mosque. He gave each household a cardboard box in which there was rice, sugar and oil. And the rest of the… every charity association that we approached said that the roads are closed because of the snow and ice. Members from the World Vision association came here a few days ago and wrote down the clothes that children need. They gave a coupon to each child. Each child is entitled to a box [of clothes]; here it is.
Interviewer: Yes, show it to me.
[Man shows a card that bears a barcode and a serial number as well as the following writing in Arabic: “Children’s Winter Clothing Program. UNICEF – Together for Children] Mohammad al-Rasheed: This is from World Vision. They gave each house [a card] that differed according to the [number] of children. Do you understand what I mean? Each child is entitled to a box of clothes. The box has good clothes in it. There is a group of people here in Qoub Elias who received [clothes]. A box contains, for example, a jacket, several pairs of trousers, gloves, boots….
These potatoes… we work as manual [agricultural] laborers in the summer. And there is a late crop [that is picked] in November. We take the girls with us to pick potatoes and the landowner gives each worker something to cook, depending on the [size] of his family.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Syrian refugee

04:08
We are dying of the cold. Could it be any worse? We can rely on God and be patient. I am pregnant, it is very cold and there is no heating. There is no aid, nothing… there is no firewood. We are miserable.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Girl) Syrian refugee Rawaa
04:50
Rawaa: My name is Rawaa. We do not have money.
Interviewer: How cold do you feel?
Rawaa: Very cold. There is no heating.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Jassem al-Nasser
05:13
“I have been here for two and a half years. We suffer from the cold, rain and snow. There is no aid or heating. Look at the situation. It is very disastrous. We were dying! The tents collapsed over our heads and water was going in from all sides. There is no heating. We are burning rags to provide heating for the children. There is no heating at all, we are dying! We put our feet on someone else’s to feel warm. “There is nothing that we do not need. We need everything: clothing, food, tents, mattresses… everything. We have not made any preparations; we only have God. We have nothing to set up. We sit and hold the wooden huts so that they do not fall on our heads. If they fall we go outside to avoid getting killed by wooden blocks. It is better to die of the cold. We are close to death. Most of us are nearly dying. Of course, we help each other. What can we do? If we did not help each other who will help us? If someone’s tent collapses we fix it for him; if someone’s tent is flooded we give him all the furniture we can offer.
“Our life [in Syria] was wonderful. We lived in bliss.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Moayyad’s father, Mohammad al-Rasheed
06:41
“The problem is that we need something to support the tent. We need to put a wooden block here to support the ceiling. The snow’s weight causes the tent to collapse. Look over here. If we did not thick tarpaulin sheets water will leak. Do you know what I mean? “We need a block of wood that is about three or four meters long. We also need to clear the roof. Otherwise, the tent will collapse.
“During a storm… the coming days will be very icy. If the tent was not supported it will fall, especially if it snowed at 2 a.m. We need to go out at 2 a.m. to clear the snow with shovels. Your hand would freeze.” 07:33 “This tent fell during the storm over the people who were inside. Bedouin men came here – we help each other out – we got these blocks of wood and put them here to support it.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, woman) Um Wissam
07:45
“During the storm the tent broke down, and Bedouin men came and lifted it again. It fell because of the snow. My children and I were sitting and saw that it fell suddenly. I started screaming and the men came right away. Thanks be to God. I started screaming, so the men were scared.” “I live with my 10 children. Interviewer: where is your husband?
-My husband is missing he is not here.” “I was scared. If there was no war in our country, my house would not been affected. “Nine children.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abdulla Bourashed, World Vision staff member

09:26
Abdulla Borashed: At the time being, we are [helping people deal with the] snow, but in general we provide water and other supplies needed for displaced people.

Interviewer: what have you brought them?

Abdulla Borashed: We brought them sanitation kits. They include wheel barrels, boots and gloves. I have also brought them nylon for the tents. Wood? No, I did not find any at the warehouse, but we will get it.

“In the winter we provide seven pieces of clothing for each family.

“A sanitation kit consists of a wheel barrel that contains an axel and two shovels, two pairs of gloves and two pairs of boots, and masks. But the wheel barrels and boots did not fit [in the car]. I will bring them tomorrow. We have been working after the storm for two days but we have not able to do much because of the snow.”

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 12
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The straw and mud structure of the school is not solid. Inside the classrooms, the walls have been starting to fall apart.

While lack of funds is one reason for the poor structure of the school, the other major factor is an Israeli law banning the use of cement for construction by Palestinians in Area C of the West Bank. The school is located in Area C, which is the part of the West Bank under total Israeli military control.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 07
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

The school of Khan Al-Ahmar has classes from grades 1 to 9. Children from five different Bedouin communities attend classes there. Every year, their number grows. There were 120 children for the 2013-2014 school year. In September 2014, 146 came to register.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 08
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

English class for 3rd grade children. All the children are eager to learn. They want to keep studying after the 9th grade, and often want to become doctor or lawyers because there are no medical or legal services in their community. While medical services are a basic essential for any community, legal services are significant to the West Bank Bedouin because they need lawyers to help them battle eviction orders from Israeli courts and the Israeli Army.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 01
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
16 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014.
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine.

Teachers run in the rain between their classrooms and the "teachers room" to bring handouts for their students.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 10
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Children in the 8th grade studying, with the shape of the tires appearing in the wall. The goal of many of the students is often to enter into a profession that is not represented in their community, like medical or legal.

Every year the school administration goes to court in order to postpone the demolition of the institution. So far, they have managed to avoid a final demolition, but the orders remain, and it is uncertain how much longer the school will remain.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 04
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Among the classrooms built of soil and rubber tires, two are built of sheet metal. These more sturdy structures are sponsored by the European Union. The State of Israel did not authorize their construction and, as a consequence, they are hidden under tents and tarps.

When materials are donated by foreign donors, like the European Union, they are still at risk of confiscation by Israeli authorities when they are shipped into the area. In February of 2014, Italy donated playground equipment. However, the entire shipment was confiscated by the Israeli Army and materials never made it to the school.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 13
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Every time it rains, the classrooms get wet and humid, and the water leaks into where the students sit. There is also no heater for the cold winter of the desert.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 11
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Harema Zhaeqq is the headmaster of the school. She is highly respected by the teachers, as they say that she is always able to find the necessary furniture for the classes, by canvassing companies in Palestine and abroad. Some companies in Palestine are hesitant to donate, because they fear sanctions from Israel. However, Ms. Zhaeqq is usually able to convince them anyway. Here, she stands beside the supplies for science classes.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 09
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

English class. The children study with bowls on the tables to capture the rain falling into the classrooms.

Thumb sm
Palestine- when a school is illegal 05
Khan Al Ahmar, Palestine
By Vinciane Jacquet
15 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan Al-Ahmar, Palestine

Two young girls are go to class amidst murals used to add color to the otherwise mundane surroundings.