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Wounded Dutch Kurdish YPG Fighter (re...
Qamishili, Syria
By Andrew Nunn
23 Jan 2015

Interview with Richard Jansen (aka "Sarahat Bhotan") at Qamishili YPG Military Hospital, "Nexwesxaneya S.Xebat"

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Dutch Fighter Wounded in Battle for S...
YPG medical clinic in Al-Qamishili, Syria
By Andrew Nunn
23 Jan 2015

In the city of Qamishili, inside of Rojava Syrian Kurdistan, a Dutch man is recovering inside of a hospital for the Kurdish fighters of the YPG. He was reportedly wounded by an Improvised Explosive Device in the city of Shingal, where the battle against the Islamic State is in full swing.

“I just don’t know what happened. Someone got I.E.D. on me. I don’t remember anything. I just remember, they told me I got an I.E.D. on my head. They screwed me over. I just don’t know what happened, man. Just blacked out.”

Dr Abat Abu Mohammad, "Sarahat Bhotan... (Alias, actual identity withheld) When he came to us from Shingal, he'd been hit with shrapnel and he was in shock. When he came the surgeon and all the doctors gathered in. We called more doctors, and all of them came. The comrade was in a coma when he got here and there was some shrapnel in his head and his face and hands. The shrapnel came from bombs and a mortar rocket -- what the Islamic State terrorists are using. We did an operation, and took the Shrapnel out of his head, two pieces of the shrapnel were large pieces, and we were just hoping for our comrade to live. He spent five days in the intensive care unit. He's been on IV infusion and some things and he's started to get better and better.”

While the Dutchman known as Bhotan by his comrades in the YPG, fights to make a full recovery, the YPG and many other Kurdish factions of the Peshmerga continue to fight for the city of Shingal and Sinjar Mountain.

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Dutch Fighter Wounded in Battle for S...
Al-Qamishili, Syria
By Andrew Nunn
23 Jan 2015

In the Kurdish controlled city of Qamishili, Syria, a Dutch man is recovering inside of a hospital for the Kurdish fighters of the YPG. He was reportedly wounded by an Improvised Explosive Device in the city of Shingal, Iraq, where the battle against the Islamic State is in full swing.

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Western Lions of Rojava: Dutch Citize...
YPG Hospital Qamishili
By Andrew Nunn
20 Jan 2015

In the city of Qamishili, inside of Rojava Syrian Kurdistan, a Dutch man is recovering inside of a hospital for the Kurdish fighters of the YPG. He was reportedly wounded by an Improvised Explosive Device in the city of Shingal, where the battle against the Islamic State is in full swing.

“I just don’t know what happened. Someone got I.E.D. on me. I don’t remember anything. I just remember, they told me I got an I.E.D. on my head. They screwed me over. I just don’t know what happened, man. Just blacked out.”

Dr Abat Abu Mohammad, "Sarahat Bhotan... (Alias, actual identity withheld) When he came to us from Shingal, he'd been hit with shrapnel and he was in shock. When he came the surgeon and all the doctors gathered in. We called more doctors, and all of them came. The comrade was in a coma when he got here and there was some shrapnel in his head and his face and hands. The shrapnel came from bombs and a mortar rocket -- what the Islamic State terrorists are using. We did an operation, and took the shrapnel out of his head, two pieces of the shrapnel were large pieces, and we were just hoping for our comrade to live. He spent five days in the intensive care unit. He's been on IV infusion and some things and he's started to get better and better.”

While the Dutchman known as Bhotan by his comrades in the YPG, fights to make a full recovery, the YPG and many other Kurdish factions of the Peshmerga continue to fight for the city of Shingal and Sinjar Mountain.

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Consumerism in Iran
Tehran, Iran
By Ruom
10 Jul 2014

Iran has seen a rise in the popularity of Western-style shopping and consumerism. Despite the sanctions imposed on them, the country’s economy continues to grow.

In the last few months we have witnessed improved relations between Iran and the West, while the upcoming negotiations for the lifting of the sanctions could pave the way for even more changes in the country and consequently also within the region.

Shopping has became a near obsessive ritual for young people, and especially women, who have now turned to buying beauty products and high-end western brands to fill the void of entertainment options and to “rebel“ against the array of restrictions they are subjected to.

During his visit to Cuba in 2012, former Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said “thankfully we are already witnessing that the capitalist system is in decay, on various stages it has come to a dead end — politically, economically and culturally.”

But the changes that have been taking place in Iran in the last few years seem to contradict this.

Despite slow mobile Internet connections, high prices for imported (most of the time smuggled) technological products and the constant governmental censorship of the media, Iranians are frantically buying smartphones, tablets and flat screen TVs.

Even if traditional Grand bazaars continue to be the favourite places to shop for regular Iranians they now face competition from huge shopping malls, which were erected in the outskirts of major cities across the country. And these offer western-style hypermarkets, international brands and colourful gaming arcades to list just a few temptations.

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man on ledge
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
13 Feb 2014

A local in front of his houses and with the view of the valley behind him . Palangan, Iran. It is mostly old people and young children left in the villages due to lack of work and education opportunities. Some young people has joined the fight in Iraq, assisting their Kurdish brothers in Iraq.

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a Kurdish village
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
13 Feb 2014

Palanagan seen from the hills, build high up the side of the mountain . Houses in the village are built in a steep gorge which allows for the rooftop of one house to serve as the yard for the house above.Life hasn't changed for centuries as the government in Tehran doesnt interferior but unfortunately for the people doesnt assist them either, keeping them in high levels of poverty. Palangan, Iran.

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Kurdish man
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
13 Feb 2014

Kurdish man on his way to look after the goats for the day. Before World War I, traditional Kurdish life was nomadic, revolving around sheep and goat herding throughout the Mesopotamian plains and highlands of Turkey and Iran. This continues in the rural area of the Kurdish area of Iran. Palangan, Iran.

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men versus women
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Feb 2014

Men wearing western leather jackets with the women wearing traditional Kurdish clothes. The modern and traditional are meeting in the mountains of Iran. Men are more likely to leave the village, looking for job or education. Some has also joined the figthing in Iraq. Palangan, Iran.

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Kurdish girl
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Feb 2014

Kurdish girl walking next to the river in Palangan. The life of Kurdish women are still conservative and more conservative than the rest of Iran. If nothing will change she will have a life of early marriage and a marriage with violence. But more girls are getting an education which is positive for the future. Palangan, Iran.

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traditional clothes
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Feb 2014

Man in traditional Kurdish clothes, shirts and large trourses. He is the owner of a small shop and thereby relatively rich. But under pressure to earn more money for the family and for education. Palangan, Iran.

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stone houses
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Feb 2014

the stone houses are built on the sides of the mountains with terraces with beautiful views. Life is relatively easy during the summer but during the winter roads are closed and there are lack of food. Palangan, Iran.

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young girls
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Feb 2014

as young girls around the world they follow different kind of fashions with a mix of local and western clothes. They live in a time with mobile phone connectivity so they are aware of the outside world and their demands for their life will affect the future of the Kurds in Iran. Palangan, Iran.

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young boy playing
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Feb 2014

young boy playing with a plastic Ak 47. Kurdish political parties is not especially active in Iran but are in the mountains of Turkey. The future is not bright for the young in Palangan. Either following in their footstep of his parents, looking after sheep, or trying to move to get a job. Or as other young people joining the fight in Iraq. Palangan, Iran.

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children playing
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Feb 2014

children playing together on one of the roofs of the houses. The future for the Kurdish kids are uncertain as an independent Kurdistan is not likely. The Iranian government is afraid that the Kurds in Iran wants to join an independent Kurdistan. Palangan, Iran.

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mother and child
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Feb 2014

A mother, dressed in traditional Kurdish clothes is carrying her little girl. About 88 percent of women in Iran’s Kurdistan Province reportedly experience some form of abuse, among the highest in the country according to the BBC’s Persian service. 66.3 percent of Iranian women experience violence in their lives. Very few men are punished for the violence and it will probably affect the upbringing of children. Palangan, Iran.

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sitting on roofs
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Feb 2014

With roof of houses forming the neighbours yard there are numerous places for meeting and the people of Palanagan use it on a daily basis. Kurds are closely connected and assist each other in order to survive the harsh life in the mountains. With almost no assistance from the government in Tehran they have to assist each others. Palangan, Iran.

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anti american protest
sanandaj
By Ulrik Pedersen
11 Feb 2014

Despite the anti government resentment among the Kurds some are participating in marking the 35th anniversary of the 1979 Islamic revolution. They are having signs with "down with america" and burns American and Israeli flags. As most like America they are mostly there because they are forced to participate. Sanandaj, Iran.

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view of Sanandaj
sanandaj
By Ulrik Pedersen
11 Feb 2014

The view of Sanandaj and surrounding mountains. The Kurdish area is one of the most spectacular areas of Iran. The Kurdish in Iran would like to join an independent Kurdistan but the Iranian government will not accept a Kurdistan. There are fears that an independent Kurdistan, under Washington and Tel Aviv’s military and security, may step up support to Kurdish irredentists inside Iran’s borders. Sanandaj, Iran.

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waiting in line
sanandaj
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Feb 2014

Women and men waiting in line for cheap food. Kurds are much poorer than other Iranians. A large depth of poverty and high unemployment in a region that is among the country’s most deprived.  Average monthly income here is no more than $300. Sanandaj, Iran.

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view of Sanandaj
palangan
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Feb 2014

The view of Sanandaj with the mountains in the background. Sanandaj is growing and growing, both economically and population even with the restrictions on Iran and internal restriction on the Kurdish population. There is a university and one of the few bright spots in the Kurdish area. Sanandaj, Iran.