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Domestic Workers Face 'Modern Slavery...
Hong Kong
By Miguel Candela
01 Mar 2015

320,000 migrant women are exposed to all kinds of physical and psychological abuse in the domestic service sector of Hong Kong. This story is a testimony of their experiences and struggles.

After being repeatedly abused and realizing that her situation would not improve, in a desperate attempt, Kamsiah ran away from her employer's house without money or documentation. Subsequently she was accused of stealing her employer's wallet which was said to contain around 900 US Dollars. Unfortunately, false accusations are a common practice to pressure migrant workers and avoid paying the wages owed to them. Barefooted, without money nor documentation, she sought refuge in a 24-hour fast food restaurant and waited until another compatriot helped her and took her to a shelter.

Esther C. Bangkawayan is the director of Bethune House shelter, where foreign domestic helpers who suffer abuse find shelter, food, and legal advice. They now house about a dozen women in trouble, but at times they even have to squeeze around 20 people in the small house nestled beside a church in Kowloon. A domestic helper herself, Esther is campaigning the government to scrap two rules she deems unfair: one which forbids employees from changing their employers more than three times a year, and another one which doesn’t allow them from changing to work at another sector of the economy.

42 year old filipino domestic helper Grace signed a misleading labour contract to work in Hong Kong but she instead ended up in Dalian, a northeast Chinese city 1,979 km far from Hong Kong. After confronting her employer about the situation, Grace was put into a return flight to Hong Kong without her pending salary and with only 200 RMB in her wallet. Grace has made now a formal complaint against the recruitment agency which made her labour contract. However, she is not very optimistic regarding her chances of recovering the debt of 40,000 pesos she currently has in the Philippines.

Eni Lestari, Indonesian, is the spokesperson for the Justice for Erwiana Committee. A domestic helper herself, she hopes to get justice for one of her compatriots, Erwiana Sulistyaningsih, who came to Hong Kong seeking for a better life and future but instead found a form of modern slavery. Erwiana’€™s employers hit her so severely that her brain has sustained irreversible injuries. As a result, she is unable to walk properly and has blurred vision. Her employer punched Erwiana so violently that her teeth cracked. She was sent to Indonesia with her body full of bruises and 8 US dollars in her pocket. Outraged immigrants like Lestari demand now justice and prison for her attackers. The Court has already declared them guilty and sentence is pending.

On Sundays thousands of Indonesian women gather in the streets and public spaces around Hong Kong to take advantage of their only day off. Most take their own food and an umbrella and talk to their friends all day long.

“€œWe barely have any money, so we have to take our lunch from our employer's house and sit in any public space that we can so we can enjoy our leisure time with our friends,”€ said Kamsiah.

To enjoy their free time and to get to know other immigrant workers in Hong Kong, immigrant groups organize activities for the women, such as beauty contests and self-defense classes in Victoria Park.  Persaudaraan Setia Hati Terate Fight Club teaches women to protect themselves from abusive employers.

Not only helping the women get away from the world of domestic work for the little time they have off or boosting their ability to defend themselves, such activities are the only social contact many have; and friends made during Sundays can be of great importance when difficulties arise.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Viome 5
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

Viome's worker inside the factory

With unemployment climbing to 30%, workers’ income reaching zero, sick and tired of big words, promises and more taxes, unpaid since May 2011 and currently withholding their labour, with the factory abandoned by the employers, the workers of Vio.Me. by decision of their general assembly declare their determination not to fall prey to a condition of perpetual unemployment, but instead to struggle to take the factory in their own hands and operate it themselves.
Thessaloniki, 29.05.2013

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Seminar on “Development and Democracy...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
10 May 2013

An international seminar on the development of democracy in the Arab world held on May 9, at the Arab League headquarters in Cairo.

The event titled “Development and Democracy and Developing the System of Arab Region”.

The seminar was attended by Arab League Chief Nabil al-Araby, a number of prominent figures, headed by former Secretary-General of the United Nations Boutros-Ghali, Secretary General of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu and Arab parliament chairman Ahmed al-Garwan.

They discussed a number of issues including implementation of good governance in the Arab region and the transition to democracy.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Arab League Chief, Nabil al-Araby:
“The political and partisan pluralism became not only one of the most important features of societal change in recent years but it also has become political and social necessity. Due to the Arab League desire to be at the forefront of the democratic scene, it worked to take advantage of their expertise from its contribution on the monitoring of electoral processes in many countries. The Arab League is monitoring electoral processes not only in Arab countries but also at Europe and Latin America.”

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Arab parliament chairman Ahmed al-Garwan:
“There is no development without democracy and there is no democracy without the real activation of the real development. The main system of the Arab parliament which was adopted by the Arab summit in its 23th meeting in the Iraqi capital Baghdad on March 26, 2012, emphasized the importance of developing the common system of Arab action, strengthening its components and enhancing its mechanisms.”

The seminar organized by the Arabic Network for Human Rights Institutions (ANHRI) led by Qatar’s NHRC in collaboration with Arab League, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and Arab Organization for Human Rights.

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – former Secretary-General of the United Nations Boutros-Ghali:
“The civil society is now playing a significant role which sometimes is considered more important that the role of the state, hence we have to enhance the role of the civil society whether scientific associations, universities and political parties.” Several Arab issues including, task of transferring into democracy and its connection with good governance, methods of development, and how to achieve social justice were discussed in the seminar.

Nationalism and development are basic factors for social justice, empowerment of women in Arab region and upgrading them in the Arab League was also in the list of discussion.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: May 9, 2013
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: May 9, 2013
Length: 00:02:47
Video Size: 137 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Medium shot of the logo of the Arab League
  2. Medium shot of flags of participant states at the meeting
  3. Various shots of attendees during the seminar
  4. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Arab League Chief, Nabil al-Araby:
    “The political and partisan pluralism became not only one of the most important features of societal change in recent years but it also has become political and social necessity. Due to the Arab League desire to be at the forefront of the democratic scene, it worked to take advantage of their expertise from its contribution on the monitoring of electoral processes in many countries. The Arab League is monitoring electoral processes not only in Arab countries but also at Europe and Latin America.”
  5. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Arab parliament chairman Ahmed al-Garwan:
    “There is no development without democracy and there is no democracy without the real activation of the real development. The main system of the Arab parliament which was adopted by the Arab summit in its 23th meeting in the Iraqi capital Baghdad on March 26, 2012, emphasized the importance of developing the common system of Arab action, strengthening its components and enhancing its mechanisms.”
  6. Various shots of attendees during the seminar
  7. SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – former Secretary-General of the United Nations Boutros-Ghali:
    “The civil society is now playing a significant role which sometimes is considered more important that the role of the state, hence we have to enhance the role of the civil society whether scientific associations, universities and political parties.”
  8. Various shots of attendees during the seminar
  9. Various shots of attendees leaving after the seminar
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Nepal Reaches 100 Days Protesting Vio...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By U.S. Editor
06 Apr 2013

Occupy Baluwtar, a campaign protesting violence against women, completed 100 days on April 6, 2013.

On 28 December 2012 the campaign began, seeking justice for Sita Rai, a migrant worker who was robbed by officials at TIA and raped by a policeman, according to media reports.

Every day from 9 am to 11 am, a group of people join the protest in front of the prime minister’s office in Baluwatar.

They have been protesting against the alleged murder of Saraswati Subedi, the disappearance of Chorimaiya Maharjan, and killings of Shiva Hasmi and Bindu Thakur.

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Nepal Reaches 100 Days Protesting Vio...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Apr 2013

Occupy Baluwtar, a campaign protesting violence against women, completed 100 days on April 6, 2013.

On 28 December 2012 the campaign began, seeking justice for Sita Rai, a migrant worker who was robbed by officials at TIA and raped by a policeman, according to media reports.

Every day from 9 am to 11 am, a group of people join the protest in front of the prime minister’s office in Baluwatar.

They have been protesting against the alleged murder of Saraswati Subedi, the disappearance of Chorimaiya Maharjan, and killings of Shiva Hasmi and Bindu Thakur.

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Nepal Reaches 100 Days Protesting Vio...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Apr 2013

Occupy Baluwtar, a campaign protesting violence against women, completed 100 days on April 6, 2013.

On 28 December 2012 the campaign began, seeking justice for Sita Rai, a migrant worker who was robbed by officials at TIA and raped by a policeman, according to media reports.

Every day from 9 am to 11 am, a group of people join the protest in front of the prime minister’s office in Baluwatar.

They have been protesting against the alleged murder of Saraswati Subedi, the disappearance of Chorimaiya Maharjan, and killings of Shiva Hasmi and Bindu Thakur.

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Nepal Reaches 100 Days Protesting Vio...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Apr 2013

Occupy Baluwtar, a campaign protesting violence against women, completed 100 days on April 6, 2013.

On 28 December 2012 the campaign began, seeking justice for Sita Rai, a migrant worker who was robbed by officials at TIA and raped by a policeman, according to media reports.

Every day from 9 am to 11 am, a group of people join the protest in front of the prime minister’s office in Baluwatar.

They have been protesting against the alleged murder of Saraswati Subedi, the disappearance of Chorimaiya Maharjan, and killings of Shiva Hasmi and Bindu Thakur.

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Nepal Reaches 100 Days Protesting Vio...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Apr 2013

Occupy Baluwtar, a campaign protesting violence against women, completed 100 days on April 6, 2013.

On 28 December 2012 the campaign began, seeking justice for Sita Rai, a migrant worker who was robbed by officials at TIA and raped by a policeman, according to media reports.

Every day from 9 am to 11 am, a group of people join the protest in front of the prime minister’s office in Baluwatar.

They have been protesting against the alleged murder of Saraswati Subedi, the disappearance of Chorimaiya Maharjan, and killings of Shiva Hasmi and Bindu Thakur.

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Nepal Reaches 100 Days Protesting Vio...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Apr 2013

Occupy Baluwtar, a campaign protesting violence against women, completed 100 days on April 6, 2013.

On 28 December 2012 the campaign began, seeking justice for Sita Rai, a migrant worker who was robbed by officials at TIA and raped by a policeman, according to media reports.

Every day from 9 am to 11 am, a group of people join the protest in front of the prime minister’s office in Baluwatar.

They have been protesting against the alleged murder of Saraswati Subedi, the disappearance of Chorimaiya Maharjan, and killings of Shiva Hasmi and Bindu Thakur.

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Nepal Reaches 100 Days Protesting Vio...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Apr 2013

Photo taken on April 6 shows a campaigner writing "Justice" on the street to mark the completion of 100 days of Occupy Baluwatar.

Occupy Baluwtar, a campaign protesting violence against women, completed 100 days on April 6, 2013.

On 28 December 2012 the campaign began, seeking justice for Sita Rai, a migrant worker who was robbed by officials at TIA and raped by a policeman, according to media reports.

Every day from 9 am to 11 am, a group of people join the protest in front of the prime minister’s office in Baluwatar.

They have been protesting against the alleged murder of Saraswati Subedi, the disappearance of Chorimaiya Maharjan, and killings of Shiva Hasmi and Bindu Thakur.

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Nepal Reaches 100 Days Protesting Vio...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Apr 2013

Occupy Baluwtar, a campaign protesting violence against women, completed 100 days on April 6, 2013.

On 28 December 2012 the campaign began, seeking justice for Sita Rai, a migrant worker who was robbed by officials at TIA and raped by a policeman, according to media reports.

Every day from 9 am to 11 am, a group of people join the protest in front of the prime minister’s office in Baluwatar.

They have been protesting against the alleged murder of Saraswati Subedi, the disappearance of Chorimaiya Maharjan, and killings of Shiva Hasmi and Bindu Thakur.

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Nepal Reaches 100 Days Protesting Vio...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Apr 2013

Photo taken on April 6 shows a campaigner writing "Justice" on the street to mark the completion of 100 days of Occupy Baluwatar.

Occupy Baluwtar, a campaign protesting violence against women, completed 100 days on April 6, 2013.

On 28 December 2012 the campaign began, seeking justice for Sita Rai, a migrant worker who was robbed by officials at TIA and raped by a policeman, according to media reports.

Every day from 9 am to 11 am, a group of people join the protest in front of the prime minister’s office in Baluwatar.

They have been protesting against the alleged murder of Saraswati Subedi, the disappearance of Chorimaiya Maharjan, and killings of Shiva Hasmi and Bindu Thakur.

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Nepal Reaches 100 Days Protesting Vio...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Apr 2013

Photo taken on April 6 shows campaigners writing "Justice" on the street to mark the completion of 100 days of Occupy Baluwatar.

Occupy Baluwtar, a campaign protesting violence against women, completed 100 days on April 6, 2013.

On 28 December 2012 the campaign began, seeking justice for Sita Rai, a migrant worker who was robbed by officials at TIA and raped by a policeman, according to media reports.

Every day from 9 am to 11 am, a group of people join the protest in front of the prime minister’s office in Baluwatar.

They have been protesting against the alleged murder of Saraswati Subedi, the disappearance of Chorimaiya Maharjan, and killings of Shiva Hasmi and Bindu Thakur.

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Nepal Reaches 100 Days Protesting Vio...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Apr 2013

Photo taken on April 6 shows a campaigner writing "Justice" on the street to mark the completion of 100 days of Occupy Baluwatar.

Occupy Baluwtar, a campaign protesting violence against women, completed 100 days on April 6, 2013.

On 28 December 2012 the campaign began, seeking justice for Sita Rai, a migrant worker who was robbed by officials at TIA and raped by a policeman, according to media reports.

Every day from 9 am to 11 am, a group of people join the protest in front of the prime minister’s office in Baluwatar.

They have been protesting against the alleged murder of Saraswati Subedi, the disappearance of Chorimaiya Maharjan, and killings of Shiva Hasmi and Bindu Thakur.

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Made in Bangladesh (23 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Made in Bangladesh (21 of 23)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
01 Apr 2013

Bangladesh’s garment industry is responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports – mainly to Europe and the United States – and therefore the single greatest source of economic growth.

An estimated number of two to three million people are employed in more than 4,000 factories all over the country, not including the thousands of sub-suppliers. About 80% of the working force are women. Although violating national law sub-suppliers often still employ children under the age of 14.

Workers are reliant on the engagement to support their families. Jobs are highly underpaid – most factories pay the maximum of 1,500-2,000 Taka (about 15 – 20 Euros) per month. Labor time is up to 12 hours a day, 6 days a week.

Several clothing buyers asked the Bangladeshi government to raise the minimum wages but factory owners argue that they will not be competitive against Vietnam, China and other big producers if they raise wages and therefore would have to close their factories and discharge all their employees.

As people are reliant on their jobs they are still willing to work even if underpaid. Continuous riots by textile workers break out – leading to short-term shutdowns and often to injuries and fatalities among workers. It is unlikely that either the international clothing companies nor the local Bangladeshi factory owners will bear the costs of raised wages.

A change of the situation will only be achieved if consumers are aware of the social inequity and put pressure on the companies involved.

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Exploitation in Istanbul's Sweatshops
Istanbul, Turkey
By DanielEtter
01 Feb 2013

ONLY PREVIEW VIDEO FOR PITCH: Istanbul is home to a large number of underground sweatshops, where illegal immigrants coming from southern asia work for exploitive wages. Taking advantage of their perilous legal status and their need to make money for their onward clandestine journey to Europe, factory owners employ these immigrants for repetitive and tedious work. Many of theme are underage – some only 12 years old. They get paid less than 0,50 USD per hour. Human traffickers take 1000 USD for the illegal border crossing to Greece.

The proposed video (3 to 5 minutes) will follow an underage refugee over the course of several days, show his daily routines and interactions and establish an emotional connection to him, letting him talk about their past, their hopes and dreams.

In longer form, this piece could also explore the larger structures behind this phenomenon – interviewing smugglers, factory owners and migration experts.

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Bricks of Bangladesh (22 of 24)
Bandarban, Bangladesh
By Karim Mostafa
08 Jan 2013

Conditions at the fields are tough. The brick-making generates a lot of dust, which affects everyone working at the site as well as people living nearby. Bricks are the most efficient and widely used building material and new brick buildings are erected across the country. Bandarban, Bangladesh. January 2013.

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Egyptian Doctors Strike, Hold Symboli...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
08 Nov 2012

Hundreds of Egyptian doctors marched on Thursday, November 8, from Omar Makram Mosque in Tahrir Square to the Egyptian State TV Building (Maspero), holding a symbolic funeral for the Ministry of Health as part of their ongoing strike calling for healthcare reforms.
On the 39th day of their strike the protesting doctors wore black clothes, holding in their hands white coats to represent coffins.
They shouted slogans and raised banners demanding social justice and better hospital security.
Their major demands include an increase of healthcare share in the general budget to 15%, better health services, increased security at health facilities and higher pay.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohamed Abdel-Sattar, a striking doctor:
“We decided today to hold a symbolic march entitled ‘the funeral of Egyptian healthcare’ due to the Health Ministry’s disregard of the strike’s three legitimate demands: to increase the healthcare budget, to increase security at hospitals and to implement the cadre of doctors within three years, not now. We want to live a decent life like everyone.”

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Amr Shura, media coordinator of the doctors’ strike committee:
“Today is the 39th day of the doctors’ strike. We tried everything. We held marches, protests, marches, etc. We’re not required to provide solutions but we did. However, there was no response. Today, we tell the health minister that he’s failed.”

A number of political forces voiced support for the mock funeral procession of the striking doctors, protesting against alleged deteriorating healthcare and negligent government.
The doctors threatened to escalate the situation if their demands are not met.
The April 6 Youth Movement, Revolutionary Socialists, National Front for Justice and Democracy and Youth for Freedom and Justice are among the forces taking part in the march.
The doctors’ partial strike started on October 1 after being approved on September 21 at a Doctors Syndicate emergency general assembly meeting.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: November 8, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: November 8, 2012
Length: 0:02:17
Video Size: 113 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

  1. Wide shot of protesting doctors marching from Omar Makram Mosque near Tahrir square to the State TV Building “Maspero”, raising banners
  2. Wide shot of protesting doctors wearing black clothes and holding their coats representing symbolic coffins
  3. Various shots of protesting doctors marching, raising banners
  4. Various shots of protestors shouting marching, shouting statements against the
  5. Close up shot of one of the protestors raising a banner against the Health Ministry
  6. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohamed Abdel-Sattar, a striking doctor:
    “We decided today to hold a symbolic march entitled ‘the funeral of the Egyptian healthcare’ due to the Health Ministry’s disregard of the strike’s three legitimate demands: to increase the healthcare budget, to increase security at hospitals and to implement the cadre of doctors within three years, not now. We want to live a decent life like everyone.”
  7. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Amr Shura, media coordinator of the doctors’ strike committee:
    “Today is the 39th day of the doctors’ strike. We tried everything. We held marches, protests, marches, etc. We’re not required to provide solutions but we did. However, there was no response. Today, we bring tell the health minister that he’s failed.”
  8. Various shots of protesting doctors shouting statements calling for increase in the budget of the Health Ministry
  9. Wide shot of the symbolic coffin of the Health Ministry on the ground while protestors standing wearing black clothes and raising banners
  10. Various shots of protestors shouting statements against the Health Ministry
  11. Various shots of protestors raising banners condemning the system of the Ministry of Health
  12. Wide shot of the symbolic coffin of the Health Ministry
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Port Gabtoli (5 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (4 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (3 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (2 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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Port Gabtoli (1 of 7)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Khandaker Azizur Rahman
06 Apr 2012

Gabtoli is a small domestic port in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Here, raw construction materials for both industrial and residential developments comes from different parts of Bangladesh. Among the raw materials are coal, stones, bricks, sand and metal. Approximately 20,000 workers labor in the port day and night, mostly originating from rural areas of Bangladesh leaving their families behind. They earn less then $4 a day to maintain their family and are literally deprived of health, education and other basic facilities.

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THE CHOSEN PEOPLE & SOCIAL JUSTICE IN...
Israel
By aldavid.a7
01 Aug 2011

At first it might have seemed frivolous, even incongruous, that the Chosen People would have decided to go camping during the hottest time of the year to protest against social injustices in the Holy Land. Those same chosen people who, let us not forget, usually spend the best part of this time of the year calculating their every move according to what distance it would put them from their holier-than-thou air-conditioning devices.