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Bosnia War: Identifying the Victims o...
Srebrenica
By Michael Biach
20 Aug 2014

On July 11, 1995, Bosnian Serb troops led by Ratko Mladic stormed through the UN peacekeeping enclave into the city of Srebrenica, executing over 8,000 Bosniaks, mostly men and boys. Now labeled a genocide, the event is considered the worst episode of European mass murder since World War II, and was the wake-up call for the West to push for the cease-fire that ended the three-year Bosnian conflict. Now, 19 years after the event, pieces of the bodies are still being found in over 300 mass graves, often in several different locations due to the perpetrators’ attempt to cover up the crime. Most of the identification work is done by the International Committee on Missing Persons (ICMP), established in 1996. The process of contacting family members is a psychologically stressful one from start to finish, as survivors re-live the agony of the loss while deciding to hold a funeral immediately or to wait until all the remains have been found. 6,066 victims have been buried so far during the annual anniversaries of the massacre in Potocari, Bosnia. The number of burials decrease every year, with 175 bodies buried in 2014.

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A Day Of Hope
Downtown, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

She asks the government to find her husband saying, "Even if he's dead, give him to me, I want to bury him with my own hands."

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A Message For Bashar
Downtown, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

A man with a message to the Syrian president asking him to release the Lebanese hostages in the Syrian prisons who've been there for almost 15 years.

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Cemetery Mothers
Mar Metri, Achrafieh, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

It gets emotional every time they hold their pictures. They visited 3 cemeteries where the state recognized the presence of mass graves, a gesture of hope, a reminder of their past and an act of determination.

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Who?
Adlieh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Lebanese authorities are responsible for revealing the fate of the thousands of persons who went missing in Lebanon over the past decades.
The people have the right to know.

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We Have The Right To Know
Adlieh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

30 years have gone by and she still has hope of finding her, dead or alive. She demands her right to know what happened.

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Massive Grave
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Over 17,000 people disappeared during the 1975-90 Lebanese Civil War. To date, the families of the disappeared continue to struggle for their right to know what happened to those who were taken from them, if they are still alive and, if it turns out that they have died, whether they can recover their remains.

PICTURED: A woman holding her husband's photo in the cemetery.

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Compassion Among The families Of The ...
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Over 17,000 people disappeared during the 1975-90 Lebanese Civil War. To date, the families of the disappeared continue to struggle for their right to know what happened to those who were taken from them, if they are still alive and, if it turns out that they have died, whether they can recover their remains.

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Lebanese Women Hold Pictures Of Missi...
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Saturday, November 17, in the memory of 30 years and 17,000 missing and disappeared persons in Lebanon's civil war, "Act for the disappeared," a Lebanese Human Rights association, organized a march with the families of the disappeared starting at Beirut National Museum and passing by three cemeteries where the state recognized them with mass graves. The march ended in Downtown near the Unesco area, joining the Lebanese families of war prisoners and abductees in Syria.

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The Sorrow Of Losing
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

There are several thousand people who were missing and forcibly disappeared in Lebanon. The great majority of them went missing during the Lebanese war (1975-1990) at the hands of Lebanese militias, as well as local and foreign armed groups.

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A Forcibly Disappeared Person
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

In Lebanon most of the missing and disappeared are civilians. Many were kidnapped from their homes, from the streets, or at checkpoints controlled by militias or foreign troops.

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LEBANON: Pact of Silence
Lebanon
By carloscastro
01 Jun 2011

SYNOPSIS:
Those who fought the war imposed silence. They could do so because they still have power. The political elite in Lebanon neither assumed their guilt in a conflict that pitted the country's communities nor held external actors accountable for their participation. Their objective has been to build a new country over the ruins of the old one in order to forget the war. The words justice, truth and reconciliation are not on the political agenda, but there are voices still crying courageous. "I can not reconcile with the criminal if I do not know the truth. Then I will decide whether to forgive or not", says Wadada Halwani, president of the Committee of Families of the Kidnapped and Missing persons in Lebanon.

The long way towards peace starts just after the signature of the peace agreements, when the complex and difficult process of building peace, memory, truth, reconciliation and justice for all the victims begins. The documentaries of the ‘After Peace' project seek to analyze and explain different paths taken by various countries who suffered an armed conflict in the last quarter of the 20th century. Researchers, activists for peace and reconciliation, victims, lawyers and educators expose what has been done and what has been ignored in their countries and talk about their experiences.