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A Trip to the Heart of Polygamy in th...
Centennial Park, Arizona
By Lola García-Ajofrín
25 Feb 2014

Text, Photos and Video by: Lola García-Ajofrín
(Available in Spanish upon Request)

VIDEO AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

Some weeks after a judge struck down parts of the polygamy law in Utah, we traveled to the heart of “Plural Culture" as some locals call polygamy. There are an estimated 38,000 Mormons who practice polygamy in the U.S, according to the advocacy group Principle Voices.

In the Cawley house, the dad, Michael, plays with his two-year-old daughter, asking her to guess who is who in front of a family portrait.

"Who is Momma Teresa?" he asks. "She is...", the girl in her father's arms babbles. "And Mama Rose? Do you find her?" "Mmm ...", she stammers, moving her finger in circles around the 18 faces in the image. She points to one of the three wives and Michael applauds.

It is an outdated but recent picture. At present there are 24 members in the family: Michael, his three wives Rose, Connie and Teresa, and their 19 children, 20 if you count one expected to be born next month. They belong to the polygamous community of Centennial Park, Arizona, on the border with Utah. The town is home to 1,500 fundamentalist Mormons.

The size of the families in this U.S. town can be guessed by the size of the houses and the number of bikes stacked next to the door. Seven bedrooms, five bathrooms, two laundry rooms and two living-rooms are spread over 300 square meters of the Cawley residence. Each room belongs to one of the wives, one for to the husband, and the rest to the children. At the entrance, there are at least eight bikes and a tricycle.

There are an estimated 38,000 Mormons who practice polygamy in U.S, mostly in Utah and the Western U.S., according to the advocacy group Principle Voices. At the pace of births by Centennial Park's residents, the figures will multiply in a matter of months.

“Something interesting about our lifestyle,” Michael muses, “is that the family continues to grow. Now I'm 45, and I hope to continue having children for the next 15 or 20 years." He smiles. He is following in the footsteps of his father, who currently has eleven wives and who gave Michael 36 siblings. Utah has the youngest population nationwide with an average of 29.2 years old according to the 2010 census. This is 22% younger than the national average of 37.2 years.

The Utah Case

On 14 December, a U.S. District Court Judge ruled in a historic decision to strike down parts of Utah’s Polygamy Law. The case was brought to court after a Utah ruling in favor of the Browns – one husband, four wives and 17 children who starred in TLC’s reality show, "Sister Wives" on their daily life in a polygamous family. U.S. District Judge Clark Waddoups upheld the court’s decision that the section of Utah’s anti-polygamy laws prohibiting the “cohabitation" violated the constitutional guarantees of religious freedom.

The Utah ruling comprises a 91-pages document where the term “private” is used 37 times and “freedom” on 14 occasions.

“This decision is fraught with both religious and historical significance for the State of Utah, because it deals with the question of polygamy, an issue that played a central role in the State’s development and that of its dominant religion, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons),” the ruling states.

About 79% of Utah’s population identifies as religious, compared to the national average of 49%. Out of this 79%, about 69% identify as Mormons, according to the 2013 state census.

The judgment only refers to the “cohabitation.” Polygamy, in the literal sense of the term – if the husband acquired several marriage licenses at a time - is still illegal in Utah and the rest of the U.S. As these husbands usually only officially get married to their first wife and “spiritually united" with the others, the judgment is a gesture to polygamous families, who have been persecuted recently.

Priscilla Hammon, a resident of Centennial Park, considers the judgment to appeal to her right "to live the way we believe that we have to live.” Since meeting her husband, this 56 year-old polygamous wife knew she wanted to “bring other ladies home.”

“We had both grown up in polygamous families and we felt that this was the way we wanted to raise our children,” she explains.

She has been married for 40 years and jokes about the fact of living with other wives.

“The difference in the style of monogamous life is that here things are magnified,” she said. “We have larger birthday parties, huge laundries, and when we make a salad, we use 14 dishes.” She acknowledges that jealousy exists. “Of course, we are human,” she adds, “but we must deal with [eachther]. If not, we would not be here."

A Divine Command

These families continue the teachings of Joseph Smith, who wrote in 1843 that plural marriage was a command from God. In 1890, the mainstream of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints abandoned polygamy, but some sects continued this practice, including the great-grandfather of Republican Mitt Romney, who left the U.S. to circumvent the laws against polygamy. Romney 's father was born in Mexico because of this.

Currently, three sects of fundamentalist Mormons embrace plural marriages in the U.S., specifically the Apostolic United Brethren (AUB) and the Independent Polygamous and Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (FLDS). The FLDS is the best known and most hermetic sect. It rose to fame with the scandals of its leader, Warren Jeffs, accused in 2006 of incest, rape, emotional and psychological abuse.

At the time of his verdict, Jeffs had about 90 wives, some of them his stepmothers before his father died. The evidence presented at trial included an audio recording he made while raping a 12 year-old girl. Between groans heard in the recording, he recites prayers. “A good woman is ready to welcome her husband and follows the spirit of peace,” he implores, and ends with, “In the name of Jesus Christ. Amen.”

Several followers of Warren Jeffs live in Colorado City and Hildale, adjacent communities to Centennial Park, right on the border between Utah and Arizona. The two groups were separated in 1980 after a leadership dispute, and one of them left Colorado City, Arizona, to settle in Centennial Park, Utah. Crossing the meters dividing both municipalities is like stepping back in time several decades. If in Centennial Park, polygamous families talk openly about their lifestyle, in Colorado City, silence reigns.

In the Land of the Prophet with 80 Wives

A truck with a woman driving and seven kids inside stops at one of the few establishments in Colorado City, a balloon store. She wears her long blonde hair tied in an elegant braid and sports a dark blue ankle-length dress with long sleeves. Some minutes later, the same scene is repeated: half a dozen kids get out of the vehicle with long braids and long dresses. NThey walk to "Craigo's," a takeaway shop in which several women in flowered shirts and bow ties prepare lemon cakes in the shape of a flower. FLDS women do not cut their hair because they believe that they will use it to wash the feet of Christ. In their dress code, the color red is prohibited. All of them refuse to talk. The tour ends with the goodbye of a Sheriff who patrols the area saying "I hope you do not break the law.”

"I'd like to let people know that not everyone in plural cultures belongs to FLDS,” laments Hammon. “It makes me very sad that today his face (Warren Jeffs ) is polygamy's face, because we know we (polygamists) have done things that are not right and neither believe nor support it.” She raises her voice to point out, “I'm not a victim, and I don't need to be rescued! I'm here because I chose to be here.”

"I Chose Heaven"

"Do you know what are the only choices that these girls have?” Kristyn Decker, 61, anti-polygamy activist and former polygamous wife asks. “Between heaven and hell. I go to heaven if I do and to hell if do not.”

Decker is the author of the book50 ‘Years in Polygamy: Big Secrets and Little White Lies,’ in which she speaks of the abuses and humiliations she experienced within a polygamous family. She is the niece of Rullon Allred, a former leader of the polygamous AUB sect, imprisoned several times for practicing bigamy, and she is the daughter of his successor.

She was five or six years-old when his half-brother Rick asked her, in the bathroom to play a game where she had to be very still. “Be a good girl and let me do it,” he told the child. “I'll buy you a candy bar when I go to the store.” Another day, an older cousin, Craig, cornered her in the kitchen and put his hands under her blouse “and up to [her] newly developing breasts,” as she recounts in her book.

She was disgusted, but she felt compelled to respect her elders. He abused her for years, but she never told anyone. “I felt it was a kind of lesson,” she says. “It was God’s will. We had to suffer and be helpful," she recalls in her bright home in New Harmony, where she has rebuilt her life with a new husband.

"When I encouraged my husband to bring another woman home, I also thought it was my choice,” says Decker. She emphasizes, “I was 25 years old. Now I know it was not, because I had nothing else in my life to choose between.”

In her book she recalls the first day she shared her husband. "I trembled inside with nausea and anger while I imagined his and Diana's bodies intertwined ( ... ), not just tonight, in her romantic honeymoon, but in the morning, again and again for the rest of our lives.” She remembers waking up at midnight and seeming to hear the panting in her hotel room, while her mother's words pounded her head: “This is God will."

Her life became a constant struggle between “divine will” and the daily face of polygamy. At first, when it was "Diana's night" –they took turns- she heard noises in the house and asked God if they were not gasps. When the doctor diagnosed her with a vaginal infection, after the second wife arrived, she realized that they would have to share everything. She became very sick to her stomach and thought about suicide several times.

“But I had to do as my mother did,” she said, “‘stretch up, put a smile on your face and behave yourself.’”

From the porch of her current home hangs a sign that reads “Decker Paradise" and a wind chime hanging from the door plays its music in the wind. Her new monogamous husband, LeRoy, makes coffee. Kristyn looks at the horizon and says, “Now I have many wonderful friends who come to my house and hang out together; but I know they are guests, and I will not have to share my husband with them in any sexual relationship.” Kristyn Decker abandoned polygamy 11 years ago. She says that this time, she chose heaven.

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A Warrior In High Heels
Cairo, Egypt
By Sergi Cabeza
18 Feb 2014

“A warrior in High Heels”

by Sergi Cabeza

It's the night before his solo performance, "Inside Out", a stage performance performed in three parts and Hazem has been in the theater all day long. He'll finish two evenings on the stage to finish his trilogy, The Nut, named after the Egyptian goddess of the sky who gave birth to the sun every morning. In his three-part dance show, he shows how Egyptian women gradually lost their importance in society through male domination. His last act addresses modern Egypt.

Hazem’s show crosses a red line that could land him in prison. In the final performance he straps on high heals, a bikini top, and struts down the stage in a catwalk. Several weeks after his show, three men were sentenced to three years in prison for debauchery, the Egyptian law used to condemn homosexuality. A fourth man was given eight years in prison on charges of running a brothel. Two of the men were accused of wearing women's clothes.

And here is Hazem on stage, dancing in his underwear, wearing a bra and a religious cap, taking off his clothes, as he slowly breaks free from a rope hanging from the ceiling that represents societal taboos.

His performance critiques how religion and men dominate his society's sexual norms. The first part was performed by eight women and the second with a mixed roster of boys and girls, but the final, solo act was to turn himself into a sexual transgressor before the eyes of the audience.

He was worried about getting arrested; however, nobody harassed him. Audiences cheered loudly at both of his sold out shows. He charged less than three dollars for tickets, despite the fact that this ticket price did not cover the rent of the theater, costumes and stage crew. A few days after his final show, he received an invitation from Tunisia, where he is due to perform in the beginning of May.

This was not the first time he faced his fears, faced his society and came out even more determined to succeed. In July 2011, Hazem walked into the center of Tahrir Square during an demonstration calling for an Islamic State. He went topless in front of the hardcore, ultra conservative crowds surrounding him and shouted against them.

“He acts in the stage as he is in the streets,” says his proud friend Diego. “He is a warrior in high heels.”

This video includes an interview with Hazem and images of his show.

Note for Sales: Hazem didn't want to give his last name.

SHOT LIST:

The show took place in the Rawabet theatre of Cairo, Egypt, the 18th of February of 2014

-0' 00'' Hazem during one of his rehearsals in the Italian Institute of Culture in Cairo some one week before the premiere of the show.

-0' 14'' Hazem interview.

-0' 20'' Hazem smokes a shish in the morning a day before the show.

-0' 25'' Walking in Cairo towards the theatre the day before the show.

-0' 33'' At the door of the theatre the day before the show.

-0' 38'' Hazem got some flowers sent to him the day before the show.

-0' 42'' Hazem interview

-0' 48'' Hazem during the show

-0' 55'' Hazem interview

-1' 02'' Hazem rehearsing in the theatre the day before the show

-1' 11'' Hazem interview

-1' 17'' Connecting the computer in the control room of the theatre the day before the show

-1' 22'' View of the theatre the day before the show.

-1' 26'' Another view of the theatre, from the stage.

-1' 30'' Hazem interview

-1' 35'' A view of the stage some hours before the show. Workers spread smashed coal as Hazem looks.

-1' 38'' The entrance to the theatre shortly before the show starts.

-1' 42'' People gathering outside the theatre minutes before the show.

-1' 47'' Hazem interview.

-1' 56'' Hazem strips during the show to remain only in his underwear.

-2' 15'' Hazem interview

-2' 21'' Dancing over religious music during the show

-2' 31'' Hazem interview

-2' 37'' The show is finished. People cheers as Hazem thanks the audience.

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Attack of Lebanese Restaurant in Afgh...
Kabul
By Masood Momin
04 Feb 2014

Afghan civil society activists denounced the Friday's terrorist attack at Lebanese Restaurant in Kabul city.

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Abortion in Ireland
Dublin
By tobiasero
27 Dec 2013

Ireland is one of the last countries in which abortion is illegal in every form. This is a story about people living a moral issue that can make their life impossible.

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Aging in Place 12
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
30 Nov 2013

After earning selling a few meals to neighbors, Munah Smith prepares to go to the store for soap and dried cowpeas. She says she has been told she was born in 1930, but she doesn’t really know her birthday. Park Hill, Staten Island, October 2015.

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Aging in Place 13
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
30 Nov 2013

A portrait of Munah Smith on her way back to her apartment after shopping for groceries in the Park Hill neighborhood of Staten Island. Through the help of family, temporary tenants and selling home-cooked food she scrapes by.

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Aging in Place 22
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
19 Nov 2013

Mr. Ge and his wife Liu receive a free dental check-up and voucher from NYU's School of Dentistry. Brooklyn, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 23
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
19 Nov 2013

In an otherwise young city where the median age is 29-years-old, the aging population is increasingly overlooked. Of New York CityÕs more than 8 million residents, over 1 million are 60 years or older. Almost half are immigrants with specific language and cultural needs. Spurred by the immigration boom of the 1980s and 1990s, the challenges this growing population contends with reveals critical issues concerning access to health care and quality of life for a graying New York City. Brooklyn, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 24
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
19 Nov 2013

An AMPHS volunteer answers clients' questions. Hewitt Chiu says they have to take time with each client to piece together a patient history for many have no documents. Brooklyn, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 25
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
19 Nov 2013

Another patient, 65, who did not want to be identified (Ms. Chen Lee Fong), was seeking an AlzheimerÕs test and said she had read about AMPHS in the newspaper. Though she has Medicaid, she says she still hasnÕt found a culturally competent primary care physician that is in close proximity to her, even though 70% of Sunset Park is Chinese speaking. Clinics like this she said saved her time and money. And stress: ÒThere is no help for us,Ó she says, Òif I am in crisis I have to go all the way to the hospital in Chinatown and thatÕs not good. There have been times when I feel I am not understood.Ó Brooklyn, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 03
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
18 Nov 2013

A resident at Serviam Gardens takes the catwalk modeling a handmade dress.

"In my area of work it's mainly immigrants," says Gloria, "Americans donÕt seem to want those jobs. But in my country we take care of our old, so it makes sense for me."

Gloria sees reason behind the differences though: "In Jamaica, one person might work while the others tend to the home, so someone can take care of a grandmother. Here, you might have two people having to work, sometimes far way, so I understand that you canÕt always take care of those at home."

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Aging in Place 04
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
18 Nov 2013

Gloria murray, 66, models a handmade skirt at a fashion show at Serviam Gardens. After a house fire in 2010, still unresolved, Gloria spent two years navigating the shelter system. "I moved to three different spaces," she says. "Drugs, pimps, the whole lot. I finally went to Safe Horizons' office and told them: ÒThe places you guys are sending us, do you ever go there and go and look at where theyÕre putting us? You pay a lot of people but you donÕt go there and see where theyÕre putting us. And I started to cry."

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Aging in Place 01
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
17 Nov 2013

Gloria Murray, 66, in her apartment in the Bronx on the day she received her citizenship . Ms. Murray says she came to the US in 1986 leaving behind her children and life to make their lives better. "When I left for the US my youngest son was one year old.I did live-in home care starting at $3/hr. and sent everything home to my three sons and three daughters. It was a rough time. You cry night and day. While youÕre eating, youÕre crying. While youÕre working, youÕre crying. But God saw me through. Immigrants make BIG sacrifices." Bronx, New York, October 2015.

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Aging in Place 02
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
17 Nov 2013

"I was able to bring some of my children here: one, my eldest daughter lives in Yonkers; two are married and live in Pittsburgh. In Jamaica, they would not have had the opportunities they do here. Unfortunately I lost one of my boys: They say it was an accidental shooting, but you know… I pray, but everywhere I go [his death] is there. He was 21-years-old. I don’t blame America, it was gun violence. You have it in Jamaica. What I never experienced in Jamaica was racism." New York, October 2015.

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Aging in Place 15
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
17 Nov 2013

Felicita Chevalier sits in her bedroom. An activist and immigrant she is one of many seniors living at Serviam Gardens, which was set aside as housing for low income seniors in the borough. Eighty percent of Serviam residents earn less than fifty percent of the Federal Low Income Level and the majority are immigrants.Bronx, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 05
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

Munah Smith at home. In an otherwise young city where the median age is 29-years-old, the aging population is increasingly overlooked. Of New York CityÕs more than 8 million residents, over 1 million are 60 years or older. Almost half are immigrants with specific language and cultural needs. Spurred by the immigration boom of the 1980s and 1990s, the challenges this growing population contends with reveals critical issues concerning access to health care and quality of life for a graying New York City. Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 06
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

Munah Smith, an immigrant from Liberia, sits in the living room of her apartment in the Park Hill neighborhood of Staten Island with Blessing, the daughter of a young couple currently living with Munah, stands beneath her.
The Park Hill neighborhood is home to the largest Liberian community outside Liberia, an African country founded by freed American slaves in the 1840s. Many Liberians fled their country due to The Liberian Civil War that took place from 1986-1997. Munah lost both her husband and later her son to the conflict.
Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 07
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

Ms. Smith finds an outlet through her spirituality. She attends the nearby First Trinity Baptist Church, a small storefront church where many new comers and elders of the Liberian community go to worship and connect with each other. Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 08
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

Munah sits with the Deacon of the First Trinity Baptist Church. Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 09
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

Munah heads back to her apartment after church service. Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 10
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

The First Trinity Baptist Church is one of many small storefront churches that keep the Liberian community connected socially, culturally and spiritually. Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 11
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

A detail of her hands, which were tattooed as a young girl in Liberia.

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The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

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The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.

Thumb sm
The FNB Durban Diwali Festival 2013 (...
Durban, Africa
By Elo B
26 Oct 2013

Diwali (The festival of lights) is a five-day Hindu festival, the biggest of all Hindus holidays. Each of the four days is separated by different traditions with its own tale, legend and myth to tell.
Its origin can be traced back to ancient India; however, there are various legends pointing to the origin of Diwali.
One week before, Hindus from South Africa have a colorful float procession in the streets to announce the Festival of Diwali and share their traditions with other communities. Local and international cultural entertainments are brought to the visitors during a fair at the Old Durban Drive-In.