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DJI_0203
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
05 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

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DJI_0179
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
01 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

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DJI_0175
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
01 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

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DJI_0181
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
01 Apr 2018

New Residential buildings seen under construction in the Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

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Made in China Container Harbor Aerial...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

Frame 0004
Aerial (Drone) Shot Hong Kong, China,...
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
30 Mar 2018

Aerial view of container terminal in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Container Terminals is the sixth busiest container port in the world. It handled over 20 million TEUs in 2017.

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DJI_0009
Tsing Yi Island, Container Terminal
By Miguel Candela
11 Mar 2018

Hong Kong skyline view seen from Kowloon Bay area of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong has the highest levels of income disparity in the developed world. In recent years, the situation among the poor has gotten worse, resulting in an increasing number of unemployed young adults and single elderly.

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Scooter Rider
Siquijor Island
By Ralf Falbe
03 Mar 2016

PHILIPPINES, SIQUIJOR ISLAND, 03.03.2016: Sun protection on a scooter.

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Beirut Scenic and Street Shots
Beirut, Lebanon
By mchreyteh
05 Feb 2016

Various shots of Beirut streets, people using smart phones and walking in Beirut Souks shopping center.

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Cuba's New Entrepreneurs
Santa Clara, Cuba
By Conteur d'images
02 Apr 2015

In Santa Clara, like in many Cuban cities, reforms passed by the Cuban government authorizing private property, most often associated with the liberalization of the economy, gave birth to a new phenomenon: the transformation of family houses into shops and businesses of all kinds. 

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST
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Les nouveaux entrepreneurs de Cuba


À Cuba, les récentes réformes sur l’accès à la propriété, les voyages à l’étranger et la libéralisation du commerce ont donné naissance à un phénomène de société qui prend chaque jour plus d’ampleur dans les villes : la transformation des maisons familiales en boutiques.

ARTICLE COMPLET DISPONIBLE SUR DEMANDE

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Consumerism in Iran
Tehran, Iran
By Ruom
10 Jul 2014

Iran has seen a rise in the popularity of Western-style shopping and consumerism. Despite the sanctions imposed on them, the country’s economy continues to grow.

In the last few months we have witnessed improved relations between Iran and the West, while the upcoming negotiations for the lifting of the sanctions could pave the way for even more changes in the country and consequently also within the region.

Shopping has became a near obsessive ritual for young people, and especially women, who have now turned to buying beauty products and high-end western brands to fill the void of entertainment options and to “rebel“ against the array of restrictions they are subjected to.

During his visit to Cuba in 2012, former Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said “thankfully we are already witnessing that the capitalist system is in decay, on various stages it has come to a dead end — politically, economically and culturally.”

But the changes that have been taking place in Iran in the last few years seem to contradict this.

Despite slow mobile Internet connections, high prices for imported (most of the time smuggled) technological products and the constant governmental censorship of the media, Iranians are frantically buying smartphones, tablets and flat screen TVs.

Even if traditional Grand bazaars continue to be the favourite places to shop for regular Iranians they now face competition from huge shopping malls, which were erected in the outskirts of major cities across the country. And these offer western-style hypermarkets, international brands and colourful gaming arcades to list just a few temptations.

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Syrians in Central Damascus Discuss P...
Damascus
By TTM Contributor 4
31 May 2014

May 31, 2014
Damascus, Syria

Video shows night shots of the Souq al-Hamidiyya historic market in the old city of Damascus. Shoppers are asked their opinions on the Syrian Presidential Election.

Speakers:

Ali Hijazi, Coffee Shop Worker:
"Concerning the social situation, it seems normal, the streets are crowded and it is improving rapidly. Shops and cafes are receiving customers, people are out at all times, nine, ten, even after eleven and twelve you can still find people outside. Everything is improving, and now it is summer, so people go out more. Tourism has decreased, but still the situation is improving."

Abu Ibrahim, Visitor from Qamishli:
"I am from Qamishli, I came to Damascus and brought my son to visit a doctor. We have been hearing from biased TV channels that the situation in Damascus at night is scary and there is bombing and shelling. However, here we are and we haven’t seen any of that, the situation is very calm and normal."

Rasha, Resident:
"First of all I want to salute Damascus and our President, and I want to note that all people are happy and out on the streets at night. There is nothing to worry about and I sincerely hope the situation will improve more because there is nothing as amazing as Damascus. May God protect our president."

Waed, Resident:
"Everything is fine, we are outside, it is 9:30 at night now and there is nothing to worry about. If any uncomfortable situation was sensed we wouldn’t have gone out at night."

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
23 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
14 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
14 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Tunisia's Tourism Sector Looks for Al...
Tunis, Tunisia
By Mohamed Haddad
14 May 2013

A Video Report Done By: Sarah Mersch & Mohamed Haddad

Tunisia has long been a favorite destination for Western tourists. Since the revolution, prices went down, but so did the number of visitors - a disaster for the vital sector of Tunisian economy. 400,000 of Tunisia’s 10.5 million inhabitants depend on tourism, which makes up seven percent of the country’s GDP. Despite this, tourism professionals are looking for alternatives, whether it be wellness, cultural or hiking trips.

This is an international version, voice over + original soundbites are on the left track, ambient sound on the right.

Sidi Bou Said, a picturesque village over the hills of Tunis. Once a must for every visitor of the country, the small town is feeling the decline in tourism since the political turnover.

Mohamed Ben Ameur still opens his little souvenir stall every day, but the craftsman struggles to make a living.

SOUNDBITE Mohamed Ben Ameur, craftsman [ar]

There is nobody. Look, it’s Saturday and it’s empty. As soon as the big cruise ships leave, the street gets empty again. That’s what the minister said as well, there are less reservations than last year.

Half a million Tunisians and almost 10% of national income depend directly on tourism. Since the revolution, reservations have gone down by almost 15%.

Hammamet, an hour south of Tunis. It once used to be the hotspot of beach tourism, but the Europeans looking for cheap sun have gone elsewhere. Even though a week of all inclusive sells at 200 Euros.

Many of the three and four star hotels haven’t been renovated in a long time and struggle to keep the standard up. A third of the establishments should close for the sector to rejuvenate, professionals tell us off the record.

For the 4 star hotel Le Sultan, the situation is difficult, but the manager Mehdi Allani tries to keep up a good service. 120 employees are taking care of one hundred clients. An investment for a better future the owner still believes in. Mehdi Allani wants the restaurant setting to be top notch, even though yesterday, only twenty people ate here.

SOUNDBITE Mehdi Allani, Vice-President, Le Sultan hotel [fr]

Today, we are living a crisis. The priority should be reactivity. But this means being very fast. But we still function slowly, we’re in the phase of ‘Ah, we don’t have the money. We should... or maybe not...’. rather than acting quickly. [...] Our competitors are very reactive. If we want to compete on eye level, we need a lot of communication, a lot of events and most of all, reactivity. We need to be hyper-creative and hyper-fast.

After the revolution, Tunisia’s authorities have realized that its prior focus on cheap beach tourism is long outdated and especially vulnerable to political instability.

But the sector is still waiting for concrete initiatives by the authorities, Mehdi Allani says. He voluntarily works in a group of officials and tourism professionals to improve the situation of the industry and promote new concepts.

SOUNDBITE Mehdi Allani, Vice President, Le Sultan hotel [fr]

If we speak about the fact that there was a revolution, it happened in Tunisia, but not at the Tunisian Tourism Office, nor at the ministry. They still need to work on changing the habits, being creative.

Allani wants to go ahead and give a good example. Next to the Sultan, he’s constructing a second, even fancier hotel. Looking for alternatives, some hotel owners are increasingly focusing on golf and spa tourists, a rich clientele that is willing to pay for good service.

At the Hasdrubal, one of the few 5 star hotels in the region, the situation is very much the same as at the rest of Hammamet. Less than 20% of the capacity of this hotel with more than 400 beds is used in late May. But the Hasdrubal features something special:

SOUNDBITE Talha Husseini, General Director, Hasdrubal Thalassa hotel [fr]

This presidential suite is the biggest of the world. It measures 1540 m², features an interior and an exterior swimming pool, five sleeping rooms,....

The Salambo suite, where stars, starlets and politicians once came and gone has been deserted since the political turnover. The hotel opens it up only for TV crews. Nobody sleeps here anymore for 5000 Euros a night, neither Bashar Al Assad, nor Algerian president Bouteflika or Mariah Carey. Talha Husseini is in a hurry to quickly lead us through the suite. Other clients are to arrive soon - at the normal hotel, which has become the Hasdrubal’s main business.

SOUNDBITE Talha Husseini, General Director, Hasdrubal Thalassa hotel [fr]

The kind of clients that use the presidential suite are really part of the upper class. And they prefer not to come as long as the political situation in Tunisia is not really stable. Honestly speaking, 2011 and 2012 weren’t great.

The days of glory of the Hasdrubal have passed. The suite is mentioned in the Guinness book as the biggest of the world. Even though the award features big on the website, it fails to attract the clients the hotel once had.

SOUNDBITE Talha Husseini, General Director, Hasdrubal Thalassa hotel [fr]

When the owner of the hotel was building it, everybody told him that he was crazy. There were no clients for this kind of luxury tourism in Tunisia at the time. So he had to develop the clientele.

The director remains silent about the exact number of guests currently visiting the hotel. Most have been shied away by bad press and security concerns. The few who come enjoy the calm and empty beaches.
This british tourist is on his first visit to Tunisia. He appreciates the increased security measures

SOUNDBITE British tourist [en]

This morning, there were policemen going along the beach in buggies. There is always a risk, wherever you go in the world. I think the Tunisian government has seen that there is an interest and a need to address any concerns and they have dealt with that.

As the Hasdrubal once brought a new category of visitors to Tunisia, tourism professionals today try to develop another new clientele. The Northern region of Kef, once the wheat chamber of the Romans: tourists
have always been a rare sight here. Today, there are even less than before the revolution. But the population tries to promote local initiatives and to attract new clients. A cave serves local painter Ammar Belghit as a workshop. It could be one stop on a tour that takes visitors around the region, from hot springs to Roman ruins and the historical city of Kef. For Ahmed Trabelsi, the revolution was a blessing.

SOUNDBITE Ahmed Trabelsi, [exact function / association]

We are a lot more flexible. There’s no police car anymore following us around to see who these people are and what they are doing at Ammar’s grotto.

Before the revolution, to organise even a small hiking tour with a group of foreigners, guides needed almost a dozen permits from local and national authorities. Now they are free to show the treasuries of a country with rich history, which has a lot more to offer than just beaches.

Conscious that alternative tourism will not save the whole industry, the locals hope to at least attract a customer base which is less vulnerable to political hiccups.

In the meantime, the beaches are awaiting another quiet summer.

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WestTX Stockyards Cafe (14 of 14)
Texas, USA
By Cécile Fandos
18 Apr 2013

Au lendemain de l'explosion, le Stockyards Café situé au bord de l'autoroute a fermé pour centraliser les donations de la grande distribution et organiser leur répartition auprès des victimes. Comme l'ensemble des salariés, qui "ne se verraient pas rester chez eux et ne rien faire", Janis participe à l'opération. Elle a été rejointe par sa fille et son gendre. "Tout le monde essaie d'aider", commentent ces derniers.
On the day after the blast, Stockyards Café, located on the side of the highway, closed its doors in order to gather the donations of large retailers and organize their distribution among the victims. Like the other employees who "could not see themselves stay at home doing nothing," Janis participates in the operation. Her daughter and son-in-law have also joined. "Everybody tries to help," they said.

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Morrocco on two wheels (19 of 25)
Essaouira, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
02 Mar 2013

It used to be donkeys laden with boxes and baskets of merchandise.

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Morrocco on two wheels (15 of 25)
Taroudant, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
27 Feb 2013

Will they carry shopping home in the qobs of their djellabas or will they use the back rack of the bike?

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Morrocco on two wheels (8 of 25)
Taroudant, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
27 Feb 2013

Red fezzes, scarves, veils and bare heads, long djellabas and jeans, hoodies and tailored shirts, leather slippers and trainers, donkeys and bikes – they all meet at the market.

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Petra Conti, Etoile and First Ballet ...
Milano, Italy
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
15 Oct 2012

Milano-Italy- October 15th-2012 –EXCLUSIVE PICTURES (ITALY OUT)
Petra Conti is La Scala’s ballet dancing star and in two years she has gone from corps to prima ballerina, or first ballet dancer, the Etoile. She graduated from the Accademia Nazionale di Danza di Roma in 2006. In Janu­ary 2007 she made her début with the Teatro Filarmonico di Verona(Italy) in the role of Cinderella in the ballet Cenerentola by Maria Grazia Garofoli. During the season 2007–2008 Petra left Italy for a year of study with the Teatro Mariinsky in Saint Petersburg, Russia. While she was there she also performed as a soloist with the Conservatorio Rimsky– Korsakov. In August 2008 she made her début as Giselle in the Anfiteatro Romano di Verona, in a version by Garofoli. During the 2008–2009 season she joined the corps de ballet of the Bavarian State Ballet in Munich, where she participated in the creation of a new new Jiří Kylián ballet, Zug­vogel. In July 2009 she performed in the Nijinsky Gala in Hamburg as the VI nymph in L’après-midi d’un faune. During August 2009 she took her place in the corps de ballet of Milan’s Teatro alla Scala where she immediately started dancing principal roles. She won great acclaim in Yvette Chauvirè’s version of Giselle, and this was followed by Kitri in Rudolf Nureyev’s Don Quixote, Juliet in Kenneth Macmillan’s Romeo and Juliet, Tatiana in John Cranko’s One­gin, and George Balanchine’s Emeralds. Petra Conti was nominated soloist after her début in the reconstruction of Raymonda in November 2011. She danced Giselle as part of the opening celebrations of the new Royal Opera House di Muscat, and in December 2011 went with the La Scala company to the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow Russia, as the first visiting company in the newly restored theatre. She danced Civiltà in La Scala’s calling-card ballet Excelsior, and Titania in Balanchine’s A Mid­summer Night’s Dream. It was on the Bolshoi stage, after the last performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, on Decem­ber 22, that La Scala’s ballet director, Makhar Vaziev, pro­moted her to the highest rank of Prima Baller­ina., The Etoile. The picture shows Petra Conti posing in front of Teatro La Scala, Milano,Italy with her life companion and first ballet dancer of Teatro La Scala, albanian dancer Eris Nezha.

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Selling Fans
Bangkok, Thailand
By Dominic.J.Lucarelli
31 Jul 2012

A woman selling fans in Siam Square in Bangkok, Thailand.

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Libya's Rebirth 13
Tripoli, Libya
By Monique Jaques
08 Jul 2012

Women visit a popular shopping mall in the middle class district of Suq Al-Jum'a.

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Spanish crisis (20 of 20)
Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
15 Jun 2009

Solitude in the market.
Barcelona, Spain. Trade also suffers the crisis and many businesses have had to close their doors for lack of credit.