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Cuba's Last Jews 18
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Aug 2015

August 29th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 19
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Aug 2015

August 29th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 12
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
26 Aug 2015

September 27th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 13
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
26 Aug 2015

September 27th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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The Last Jews of Cuba
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15,000 Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their business and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Havana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Israel.

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Cuba's Last Jews 02
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 03
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 04
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 05
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 25
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 06
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 07
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 08
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 09
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 10
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 01
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Cuba's Last Jews 11
Havana, Cuba
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
25 Aug 2015

September 26th, 2015, La Habana, Cuba. Before the 1959 revolution in Cuba, there was about 15 thousand Jews living within the country's borders. Today, a mere 1500 are left. Most Jews in Cuba were business people thriving due to the adequate business environment within the country. With the arrival of Fidel Castro and his Communist ideas, many of these Jews lost their bunsiness and moved to the US, mostly in Miami. Though never persecuted, but rather well treated by the regime, most prefered to leave to prosper economically somehwere else. There are three main Jewish/Synagogues within Habana which are quite active in keeping the renmants of the community together, with the help of money coming from Jewish organizations in the US and Isreal. (Jonathan Alpeyrie/Transterra Media)

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 23
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Jun 2015

A local Jewish mother is teaching her young daughter how to enter a bomb shelter in their garden in case of an artillery strike.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 24
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Jun 2015

Mariupol’s Jewish community is spread out, and some members, like Natalia Lavushko and her husband, Grigory, live on the city’s outskirts—areas that would be early targets in the event of a new offensive. The Lavushkos have stopped renovating their modest house because Ukraine’s currency devaluation has eaten into their meager income.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 25
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
08 Jun 2015

A young Jewish girl from the Mariupol community is writing on a board during classes inside the Chabad center.

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Bar Mitzvah
Jerusalem
By Ralf Falbe
11 May 2015

Bar Mitzvah service, a Jewish religious tradition, in the old city of Jerusalem.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 27
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Apr 2015

A few remaining Jewish families still present in the port city of Mariupol allow their children to be taught at the only Chabad center left in the town.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 26
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Apr 2015

Young members of the Jewish community are learning how to use a computer in a basement inside the Chabad center of Mariupol.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 28
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Apr 2015

Teachers from the Chabad center of Mariupol are teaching young ones how to use a computer.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 30
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Apr 2015

A group of Jewish teenagers have gathered, as they do each day, in the Chabad center to play piano, and interact.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 29
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Apr 2015

A group of teenagers are taking some time off by inspecting the near by destroyed original Synagogue of Mariupol.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 31
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Apr 2015

A pair of Jewish girls are having fun inside the remains of the destroyed Synagogue of Mariupol.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 32
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Apr 2015

Rabbi Cohen is reflecting on the idea to one day rebuilt the once proud and only Synagogue of Mariupol.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 33
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Apr 2015

Rabbi Cohen is playing with a tree branch inside the remains of the only Synagogue in Mariupol.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 34
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Apr 2015

Rabbi Cohen and two teenagers of the community are walking back to the Chabad center.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community Near the ...
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Apr 2015

Only a few thousand Jews have remained in the port city of Mariupol. A mere 12 kilometers east of the city, fighting rages between pro-Russian separatists and volunteer battalions struggling to keep the town of Shirokino. The Chabad Lubavitch organization tries to keep track of its members still within the city while providing aim to the numerous Jewish families in need. Volunteers gather each day at the local Chabad center in central Mariupol helping to pack foodstuffs in plastic bags for local Jewish families who have decided to remain in the port city.

Natasha Ralko's windows were blown out while she was sitting in the living room of her apartment with her daughter and 8-month-old infant. Her kitchen is now heavily damaged. Ralko believes the death toll in eastern Ukraine is much higher than reported. Mariupol’s Jewish community is spread out, and some members, like Natalia Lavushko and her husband, Grigory, live on the city’s outskirts—areas that would be early targets in the event of a new offensive. The Lavushkos have stopped renovating their modest house because Ukraine’s currency devaluation has eaten into their meager income.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 10
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Apr 2015

Members of the Chabad community are taking a break from packing food produce.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 11
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Apr 2015

A view of a Jewish calendar which shows old photos of the thriving Jewish community before WWI.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 12
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Apr 2015

Members of the Jewish community are taking a rest inside the Chabad center of Mariupol.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 13
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Apr 2015

A member of the Chabad community reads from the Tora inside the only Jewish center left in the port city.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 14
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Apr 2015

A local member is writing a note inside the Chabad center of Mariupol.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 15
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Apr 2015

The Rabbi Cohen, and his wife are helping all Jews still living in Mariupol seeking help and council. Though many thousands have fled to safer areas, a mere three thousand are said to have remained within the city.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 16
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Apr 2015

Rabbi Cohen describes the day massive artillery strikes hit the Northern parts of Mariupol, killing dozens in the process.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 17
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Apr 2015

Mariupol Jewish community member Natasha Ralko, whose windows were blown out while she was sitting in the living room of her apartment with her daughter and 8-month-old infant, and whose kitchen is now heavily damaged, believes the death toll in eastern Ukraine is much higher than reported.

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Mariupol's Jewish Community 18
Mariupol, Ukraine
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
28 Apr 2015

Mariupol Jewish community member Natasha Ralko, whose windows were blown out while she was sitting in the living room of her apartment with her daughter and 8-month-old infant, and whose kitchen is now heavily damaged, believes the death toll in eastern Ukraine is much higher than reported