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Syria: Battling Cancer in Besieged Gh...
Eastern Ghouta
By Jawad Arbini
10 Jun 2015

10 year old Ammar suffers from neuroblastoma, a rare type of childhood cancer that develops in infants and young children. Ammar lives with his family in the opposition-held area of Douma, in Eastern Ghouta. The residents of Eastern Ghouta have been surviving under extremely hard living conditions due to the ongoing siege imposed by the Assad regime's forces over the past two years.

In Dar al-Rahma, the only active cancer center operating in Eastern Ghouta, Dr. Wissam says that Ammar suffered sever emotional trauma, which was the primary cause of his neuroblastoma.

Ammar’s mother remembers when, nearly 3 years ago, heavy clashes and shelling erupted in the neighborhood where they reside. The clashes lasted for three hours and severely terrified Ammar. Since then the boy had suffered from fever and continuous sickness.

Dr. Wissam also stressed that with very little resources, Dar al-Rahma center is currently treating about 600 patients suffering from different types of cancer with an 11% death-rate.

Unfortunately, Transterra Media received a message on the night of Saturday, June 13, 2015 announcing the death of Ammar.

Transcription:

  • (02:27) Um Ammar, Ammar’s mother (woman, Arabic):

Ammar was sitting at the balcony when shelling and clashes erupted, he was extremely terrified, since then he suffered from continuous fever and sickness. We took him to the doctor who examined him and found out that he has neuroblastoma. It’s a rare disease that infects one out of every 10,00 children, and the reason is emotional trauma. (02:50)

(02:51) Given that the area is besieged, how are you receiving Ammar’s medications? (02:58)

(02:58) The doctor gets part of them, but we were responsible to get the rest. There are also some medical tests that the doctor asks us to do, but we cannot send it for analysis in Damascus. This is an additional reason why his situation is relapsing, not being able to deliver the medical tests to Damascus. This made his recovery take more time. This led [Ammar] to loose his sight. We are hoping, but we don’t think he could get any better now (03:38).

(03:40) Under the siege, should Ammar follow a specific diet program? (03:45).

(03:46) The doctor says that half of the treatment is done through his diet program. Alhamdulillah we are doing all what we can. We cannot do anything more. Yes, he should follow a specific diet program, unlike other children (04:02).

  • Doctor Wissam, Doctor specialized in cancer diseases (woman, Arabic):

(04:24) At first, Ammar was diagnosed after he was suffered from a shock. He suffered from continuous sweating and fever, and he was later diagnosed with neuroblastoma. He started with this treatment and then had to stop it at the (name of the previous hospital) where he had already started the treatment, and came to continue the treatment here. When he got here, he was already in the recovery stage, but unfortunately, within two months, his situation relapsed dramatically due to a psychological trauma. We had to start a new treatment phase. One of the reasons why his treatment was delayed was the lack of the MRI Scanners. In addition of the lack of the medications, either because a delay in the supply or because of the hard situation to get the medications in Ghouta, we are trying at the moment to stay in contact with international organizations such as the Red Crescent or other organizations responsible for swelling diseases, perhaps Ammar has any chance [by getting the medications inside Ghouta]. (05:32).

(05:33) What are the efforts that this medical centre is doing under the siege? (05:40).

(05:41) At the moment we have more than 600 persons who are documented of having swelling diseases that are under treatment, and a percentage of 30% of recovery, and 10.5% of deaths. We are trying to give them the medications as much as possible, but we are facing some difficulties in doing so. The besiege and the diet factor are playing a negative role in the process, because it is known that the cancer patient needs a specific food diet program so that his body can bear the medications he is receiving. In addition of course to the negative psychological factor (06:22).

  • Heba, Nurse (woman, Arabic):

(08:16) Here’s a breast eradication with part of the other breast and some parts of the armpit.. we take samples of the armpit and sample of the breast to check how bad is the infection, we record it and we send it for the lab analysis.

  • Abu Khaled, Managing Director of Dar al-Rahma center (man, Arabic):

(08:29) Sometimes the patient comes and take the dose of the medications to make the swelling smaller. We are sometimes in need of a surgery, but unfortunately, most of the medical centers that do these surgeries stopped their operations. The reason is because their efforts are put only for the injured people. This reason sometimes plays a negative role in the recovery of the patients, because the patients who are not getting this surgery have their situation relapsed.

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Physiotherapy Clinic Heals Children a...
Latakia
By Hashem
15 Feb 2015

Latakia, Syria

February 15, 2015

AT THEIR REQUEST THE FACES OF THE DOCTORS AND THERAPISTS INTERVIEWED ARE NOT SHOWN FOR REASONS OF PERSONAL SAFETY AND SECURITY.

At the Flooka Physical Therapy Center in rural Latakia province, Syria, Dr. Khaled treats all manner of patients, from Free Syrian Army (FSA) fighters to children with disabilities. In his small clinic, which sees 25-30 patients a day, Dr. Khaled and his devoted staff use a combination of personal care and up-to-date technology (infrared, radiotherapy) to help residents from near and far recover from war-related injuries and other ailments. A largely Alawite region known for being the birthplace of the Assad family and a stronghold of the regime, parts of rural Latakia have nonetheless fallen under control of the rebels.

TRANSCRIPT

Dr. Mohamad Ajouz
(Man, Arabic) (01:40-02:54)

Our patient was injured by shrapnel two years ago, and came to the center for physical therapy about a year ago because of serious injury to his sciatic nerve. After a year of physical therapy, we did not get desirable results because his injury was too severe. Now, after consulting with an orthopaedic surgeon, he was advised to have surgery. Now we're getting him ready for surgery, preparing the muscles, so that when the surgery is done he can return and we can continue the physical therapy, and he will hopefully be healed.

Abu Mohamad, FSA fighter:
(Man, Arabic) (03:48-04:30)

I sprained my ankle and suffered from ligament rupture. I was not able to walk comfortably, so I came here to the physical therapy center and had many sessions, which are definitely helping. The center provides excellent care, and the workers are doing their best to help us. They spared us a trip to Turkey that we might have been forced to take, but the problem is that this is the only physical treatment center here and there is a lot of pressure, a huge number of people come here, and sometimes we have to wait until they finish treating other injuries before getting a turn.

Abu Hussein
(Man, Arabic) (07:13-07:33)

At an early point, we discovered something was wrong with her and took her to Turkey, Antakya and, from there, were transferred to Adana, where they ran some tests and told us that she suffers from brain malformation and needs physical treatment. So we brought her here to the "Floka al-Hurreya" physical therapy center to get treatment.

Dr. Khaled:
(Man, Arabic) (08:59-10:22)

We are now in the "Floka al-Hurreya" physical therapy center. The center has been open for a while and is operating smoothly. It receives about 25-30 patients a day. We have some machines and equipment to help treat patients injured in war; most people we treat have been injured in the war. We have machines to support the hips, infrared machines, a radiotherapy machine and machines to treat nerves; we have steps, a treadmill and many other machines.

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Wounded Dutch Kurdish YPG Fighter (re...
Qamishili, Syria
By Andrew Nunn
23 Jan 2015

Interview with Richard Jansen (aka "Sarahat Bhotan") at Qamishili YPG Military Hospital, "Nexwesxaneya S.Xebat"

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Dutch Fighter Wounded in Battle for S...
YPG medical clinic in Al-Qamishili, Syria
By Andrew Nunn
23 Jan 2015

In the city of Qamishili, inside of Rojava Syrian Kurdistan, a Dutch man is recovering inside of a hospital for the Kurdish fighters of the YPG. He was reportedly wounded by an Improvised Explosive Device in the city of Shingal, where the battle against the Islamic State is in full swing.

“I just don’t know what happened. Someone got I.E.D. on me. I don’t remember anything. I just remember, they told me I got an I.E.D. on my head. They screwed me over. I just don’t know what happened, man. Just blacked out.”

Dr Abat Abu Mohammad, "Sarahat Bhotan... (Alias, actual identity withheld) When he came to us from Shingal, he'd been hit with shrapnel and he was in shock. When he came the surgeon and all the doctors gathered in. We called more doctors, and all of them came. The comrade was in a coma when he got here and there was some shrapnel in his head and his face and hands. The shrapnel came from bombs and a mortar rocket -- what the Islamic State terrorists are using. We did an operation, and took the Shrapnel out of his head, two pieces of the shrapnel were large pieces, and we were just hoping for our comrade to live. He spent five days in the intensive care unit. He's been on IV infusion and some things and he's started to get better and better.”

While the Dutchman known as Bhotan by his comrades in the YPG, fights to make a full recovery, the YPG and many other Kurdish factions of the Peshmerga continue to fight for the city of Shingal and Sinjar Mountain.

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Dutch Fighter Wounded in Battle for S...
Al-Qamishili, Syria
By Andrew Nunn
23 Jan 2015

In the Kurdish controlled city of Qamishili, Syria, a Dutch man is recovering inside of a hospital for the Kurdish fighters of the YPG. He was reportedly wounded by an Improvised Explosive Device in the city of Shingal, Iraq, where the battle against the Islamic State is in full swing.

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Western Lions of Rojava: Dutch Citize...
YPG Hospital Qamishili
By Andrew Nunn
20 Jan 2015

In the city of Qamishili, inside of Rojava Syrian Kurdistan, a Dutch man is recovering inside of a hospital for the Kurdish fighters of the YPG. He was reportedly wounded by an Improvised Explosive Device in the city of Shingal, where the battle against the Islamic State is in full swing.

“I just don’t know what happened. Someone got I.E.D. on me. I don’t remember anything. I just remember, they told me I got an I.E.D. on my head. They screwed me over. I just don’t know what happened, man. Just blacked out.”

Dr Abat Abu Mohammad, "Sarahat Bhotan... (Alias, actual identity withheld) When he came to us from Shingal, he'd been hit with shrapnel and he was in shock. When he came the surgeon and all the doctors gathered in. We called more doctors, and all of them came. The comrade was in a coma when he got here and there was some shrapnel in his head and his face and hands. The shrapnel came from bombs and a mortar rocket -- what the Islamic State terrorists are using. We did an operation, and took the shrapnel out of his head, two pieces of the shrapnel were large pieces, and we were just hoping for our comrade to live. He spent five days in the intensive care unit. He's been on IV infusion and some things and he's started to get better and better.”

While the Dutchman known as Bhotan by his comrades in the YPG, fights to make a full recovery, the YPG and many other Kurdish factions of the Peshmerga continue to fight for the city of Shingal and Sinjar Mountain.

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Dreadful Disease Appears in Eastern G...
Ghouta
By Mohamad al-jazaare
24 Dec 2014

Hamourieh, Eastern Ghouta, Syria

Harsh humanitarian conditions in besieged Eastern Ghouta near Damascus have caused a rare, grisly disease surface. Young Hiba is being treated from myiasis, a skin infestation caused fly maggots.

Staff at the local Dar al-Rahma Medical Center (DRMC) are doing their best to offer Hiba and other patients proper care, despite the severe shortage of medical supplies in Eastern Ghouta.

The center is also treating many patients from cancer. Tasneem is a five-year-old girl who is diagnosed with leukemia. DRMC’s director Dr. Wissam says that she and her colleagues face a large difficulty in providing cancer medications that will not expire soon.

Shot List

1 Various of Dr. Wissam picking worms out of Hiba (young girl)’s scalp.

Natural Sound (Arabic, Woman and man) conversation between Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center and Hiba’s father

Dr. Wissam: “These are pouches. If we do not clean them they might be hiding something bigger. I do not like this area. They should not have remained.”

Father: “Her mother is giving her a shower every day.”

Dr. Wissam: “There is a lack of education and awareness (…). These remaining pouches will not help me. I wanted to see her in two days but I do not want to see anything like this.”

2 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center

(01:12) “Hiba’s case is the first case of miyasis that we diagnosed in Eastern Ghouta. Her scalp is infected. Such diseases are due to the lack of pesticides, which causes the appearance of large houseflies. In addition to that, these diseases are caused by the lack of water in the area.” (01:29)

(01:29) “At the moment, the girl’s condition has improved, and she is healing and under medical observation. We hope not to discover new cases.” (01:35)

3 Wide of Dr. Wissam, Hiba and Hiba’s father at the medical center.

Natural Sound

Dr. Wissam: “This is why she was in pain and could not sleep. After they [the worms] were taken out, she felt better. She has not been complaining of any pain.”

Father: “Not at all.”

Dr. Wissam: “We will only observe her. If anything appears, we will see it immediately. I do not want to cut her [scalp].”

4 SOUNDBITE (Man, Arabic) Ahmad, Hiba’s Father and an unidentified woman

(02:26) “It all started a week ago, and we thought it was an allergy. I took her to the medical dispensary where they prescribed her a medication and ointments. I then took her to another dispensary in Harasta where they told me it was probably impetigo [a skin disease] and they prescribed her an ointment. But my daughter was in a lot of pain, and I thought it does not look like a normal allergy. So I brought her here after her situation got worse and she was in pain at night. We feared that she might had a malignant disease. When we discovered that she had worms in her head, we directly thought that this was not normal. We brought her here.” (03:16)

5 Close up of Dr. Wissam taking worms out of Hiba’s scalp.

Natural Sound (Arabic) Conversation among

Dr. Wissam: “Do we have tweezers? [UNINTELLIGIBLE] Do you know blue flies? These are blue flies’ eggs.”

Father: “What about this?”

Dr. Wissam: “You have to shave her head, brother. Alright?”

Father: “Yes”

Dr. Wissam: “Because they are hiding in the hair. If there is anything that has not come out…”

Unseen woman: “How could they say it is normal and the girl was not hit by a bullet or did cut her head?”

Father: “They diagnosed it as impetigo.”

Unseen woman: “When did this start, doctor?

Doctor Wissam: “Three days ago.”

Father: “Three days ago, she started having a headache.”

Unseen woman:”How did this decay happen?”

Dr. Wissam: “It started before.”

Father: “Her face and neck were swollen.”

Unseen woman: “How did the fly lay its eggs here?”

Dr. Wissam: “Only God knows. One, two, three, four, five, six – six worms from a single spot. I once received a patient whose eye was eaten [by worms].”

6 Various of street. Natural Sound: (Arabic) Call for prayer.

7 Various of Tasneem, young girl in hospital bed

8 Various of Doctor Wissam injecting needle in Tasneem. Natural Sound: “Give me your hand.”

9 Close up of serum dripping

10 Various of Tasneem in hospital bed.

11 Various of Doctor Wissam injecting needle in Tasneem.

Natural Sound: Tasneem crying, Doctor saying to her: “We will only remove this. It is over. We removed it. It is over. It is over. There is nothing.”

12 SOUNDBITE (Woman, Arabic) Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center

(09:20) Tasneem is a young girl aged five; she suffers from severe lymphocytic inflammation after her father was martyred. She is currently under treatment, but we are facing obstacles in supplying medicaments that have long shelf lives due to the siege on Ghouta (09:35).

(09:35) “Tasneem is not the only child who suffers from this disease. The number of children diagnosed with such diseases increased lately, due to the conditions under the siege on Ghouta. [Inadequate] nutrition or environment, as well as psychological factors largely increase the rate of these diseases.” (09:52)

13 Various of petri dish preparation

14 SOUNDBITE (Woman, Arabic) Um Imad, Tasneem’s grandmother

(10:17) Tanseem has had leukaemia for almost two years. She was treated in Damascus first, but due to circumstances we could no longer go there, I mean because of the siege. Two months ago, the condition resurfaced and we came to this center where she is being treated, thanks be to God. I wish that God rewards them [medical center workers] well (10:46)

15 Various of Tasneem walking

16 SOUNDBITE (Girl, Arabic) Tanseem, girl suffering from cancer

(11:08) My name is Tasneem. I wake up every morning, I go to school and then I play with Toufic. My grandmother then takes me to the office [clinic]; they insert a needle into my vein [UNINTELLIGIBLE].

17 Wide of Tasneem playing with other children.

18 SOUNDBITE (Girl, Arabic) Tanseem, girl suffering from cancer

(11:40) “Here is my father’s photo. He was going to Dukhanya [town in Eastern Ghouta] when he was shot by a sniper and martyred.”

“This is my cousin, I always play with her. And this is Toufic, he is older than I am. He always plays with me. This is Mohammad, my younger brother. He does not give his mother a hard time.”

“Bye.”

19 Various of decomposing cattle carcasses

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Bloodletting in Old Delhi
By Sinha Archit
03 Jun 2014

Despite medical science not believing in bloodletting, lot of people from local and rest of the world come to Mohammad Iqbal for the treatment in Old Delhi .He claims to be the only bloodletting therapist in the world .He charges a very low fee and to few poor patients he performs bloodletting for free.

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Bloodletting Treatment in Delhi
New Delhi
By Rajan Zaveri
26 May 2014

Bloodletting practitioner Mohammad Gyas watched as his son sliced open the tourniquet-bound hands and feet of the sick with single-use razor blades in the garden of Old Delhi's Jama Masjid.

The ‘bad blood’ spilled into gutters that ran along the side of the platform, washed from the patient’s limbs with jugs of water. This ancient medical practice is said to cure everything from heart pain and arthritis, to cancer and diabetes.

"The darker the blood, the longer you have to bleed," Gyas said. A typical treatment regime runs for six weeks.

Gyas’ son was working with half a dozen assistants. They wrapped the tourniquets and washed water over the blade wounds to flush out blood. They then treated the cuts with a mixture of spices and doctor was on hand to give tetanus injections.

Gyas learned the trade from his grandfather and passed on his skills to his son. He has been practicing and overseeing treatments at the same place every day since 1980. During that time he has saved every single razor blade he used, which he proudly displays in 20 plastic drums.

“This many years, this many people, this many blades,” he said, pointing proudly to the plastic drums. “How could you doubt my treatment working?”

Gyas suffers from Parkinson’s disease, which has prevented him from doing any of the work himself since 2008. Interestingly, neither he nor his son sported any nicks or cuts on their own limbs. However, that does not deter the duo's patients who travel from far-flung parts of India and even other countries, including Japan and the United States. Many of them swear by the treatment, which includes following a strict no-booze, no-smoking, legume-rich diet.

One of Gyas' longtime arthritis patients demonstrated his belief in the treatment by leaping spiritedly on and off a brick platform in the garden.

“Look at me now!” he exclaimed in broken English, grinning and bouncing gratefully. “I can move everything, there’s no pain.”

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Libya’s Only Addiction Clinic Struggl...
Benghazi, Libya
By Tripcarbons
15 Apr 2013

In the octagonal communal garden at the centre of Benghazi’s Al Nafsia drug addiction clinic four men sit quietly talking in the shade. The atmosphere of contemplation makes the clinic seem like an oasis of calm in a city where assassination attempts and armed raids are a monthly occurrence and the soundscape is regularly punctuated by gunshots and squealing tires.

Here Libyans with addiction problems are helped to kick their habits with the help of psychologists and tailor made drug courses. The only problem: this clinic has room for just 40 inpatients, and it is the only treatment centre of its kind in a country where drug addiction is rapidly increasing.

Doctors across Libya say they are being overwhelmed by patients with drug problems and it is proving impossible to provide appropriate treatment for everyone.

‘Every month more people come to us needing help,’ says Dr Abdullah Fannar, deputy director at Tripoli’s Gargaresh psychiatric hospital. ‘It’s part of the fallout from the revolution. The government security forces are weak and hundreds of thousands of Libyans were displaced, wounded or bereaved during the uprising. Now street drugs are proving to be an attractive solution to many of those who are struggling to deal with their new reality.’

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Positive Is Negative
Wamena, Indonesia
By U.S. Editor
15 Feb 2013

HIV/AIDS in the highlands of Indonesia Papua

The fact that HIV infection is higher among ethnic Papuans is representative of greater socio-economic inequalities. Much remains to be done to reach the United Nations Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS and the Millennium Development goals. In Papua, the severity of the situation has been completely underestimated by the authorities and so far, their response to the epidemic has been severely inadequate. In order to decrease dissatisfaction with their rule, a general attitude of the Indonesian government has been to provide local governments in Papua with large amounts of money. It is then assigned to various programs without proper preliminary research and subsequent monitoring. The actual causes of the problem however, are rarely tackled. The poor standards or complete lack of health services and education throughout the region not only facilitate the spread of the disease, they also severely impede any efficient response to the epidemic. Indeed, although the provincial governments have made HIV testing and treatment free, many Papuans do not have access to health care or education and are unlikely to be reached by awareness raising campaigns any time soon. In the meantime, the virus continues its deadly advance into the highlands.

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Health in Uganda (20 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a one month baby girl with evident signs of malnutrition.

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Health in Uganda (21 ...
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19.The picture shows a one month baby girls with evident signs of malnutrition.

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Health in Uganda (10 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda-March 10, 2013-
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a woman affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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Health in Uganda (12 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda-March 10, 2013-
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a man affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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Health in Uganda (13 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero-Uganda-March 10th,2013-
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a man affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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Health in Uganda (14 ...
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a man affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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Health in Uganda (15 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a man affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital, waiting for anti retroviral medicine.

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Health in Uganda (16 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a young mother, affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital, waiting for having anti-retroviral medicine.

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Health in Uganda (17 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows an old woman, affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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Health in Uganda (18 of 49)
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows two women affected by HIV/AIDS, during the daily visit in Luweero general hospital.

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Health in Uganda (19 ...
Luweero, Uganda
By Papillon
10 Feb 2013

Luweero, Uganda - March 10, 2013
Involvement in the promotion of better health is central in the development of Uganda as a better nation. This includes clean hospitals and health centers, schools, wells and effective community outreach programs in which people receive free medication, health services and mosquito nets. But even with the strong government efforts in reducing mortality rates, the situation is still serious and dangerous in some areas of Uganda. Children are at especially high risk of vector borne diseases including malaria, as well as water-borne diseases including bacterial diarrhea. Maternal mortality is high in Uganda, and pregnancy is still the leading cause of death for young women ages 15 through 19. The picture shows a young boy, Thomas,15 tears old affected by HIV/AIDS, during lying down the bed, in Luweero general hospital.

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Positive is negative: HIV/AIDS in the...
Wamena, Indonesia
By Carolincik
01 Feb 2013

In the courtyard of the public hospital in Wamena, contaminated needles, blood packs and other highly hazardous waste lie unchecked next to hospital vegetable garden.

People from all over the valley have to come here for treatment, sometimes walking for days.

The poor standards or complete lack of health services and education throughout the region not only facilitate the spread of the disease, they also severely impede any efficient response to the epidemic. Indeed, although the provincial governments have made HIV testing and treatment free, many Papuans do not have access to health care or education and are unlikely to be reached by awareness raising campaigns any time soon.

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Smuggled to Safety
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
17 Jul 2012

Physical therapist work on Ahmed Kalif,  27 from Homs Syria who was with his family hiding in there home when the Syrian Army began airstikes and firing tanks into his neighborhood, his home crumbled around him and his wife and daughter leaving them exposed  he began moving his family across the street to another home when another burst of shells hit the street and shrapnel tore off his left leg. He was rounded up with other wounded civilians and smuggled into Jordan by the Free Syrian Army where he is still undergoing rehabilitation. He claims that if the Free Syrian Army was not there to defend us all of Homs would have been killed. Amman, Jordan July, 2012.

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Cleaning Shrapnel
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
17 Jul 2012

MSF Reconstructive surgical project started in August of 2006 joins three surgical specialties: maxillofacial, orthopedic and plastic, and receives highly complex cases. Over 1700 victims of violence from Iraq, Gaza, Yemen, Libya and Syria have been admitted to MSF surgical project since its start. Admitted patients are those who were directly affected by violence in their home countries, like gunshot, missile and explosion related injuries. The possibility of getting a successful surgical and functional outcome is an essential standard for accepting cases.
The complexity of received cases often requires a multi-staged reconstruction of both hard and soft tissues. This means patients need to stay for a relatively long period of time close to the MSF surgical facility in Amman for monitoring the progress of treatment and for optimal planning of the stages of treatment. This reconstructive surgical project is a highly demanding one at technical level, and requires a skilled surgical, anesthetic and nursing team. Here a MSF surgical team digs shrapnel out of a 10 year old boys knee from Iraq. Amman, Jordan 2012.

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Watching Homs Burn
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
17 Jul 2012

Abdul and his two children receive treatment for their wounds from a Syrian tanks that fired into their home while besieging the city of Homs in March, collapsing the ceiling on him and his family severely burning their bodies. Abdul and his family were escorted by the Free Syrian Army on a dangerous trek south to the border of Jordan to receive medical treatment. Amman, Jordan July 2012.

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Leper Community In Addis Ababa (19 of...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
18 Jul 2007

Two women with leprosy are being treated at the Alert hospital, the only facility that treats lepers and other kind of skin sicknesses in the Lepers slum of Northern Addis Ababa July 18, 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. These women have come from the countryside to get a free treatment, and potentially get an amputation in some cases.