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Thousands Queue Amidst Fuel Shortage ...
Sanaa
By assamawy
03 Apr 2015

The impact of the ongoing war on Yemen's people has now begun to appear in the form of extremely long lines outside of gas stations. Sana'a, which has around 3m people, has suffered from fuel shortages for several months out of the past year. People not only use fuel for cars, but also for home generators since the country has no stable electricity and electricity cuts can last for more than 12 hours a day. As such, people depend mainly on personal generators to lighten the dark nights. Though expensive, the people of Yemeni have no other options.

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Drowning Civilizations: Turkey Dams T...
Halfeti and Hasankeyf, Turkey
By Ibrahim Karci
01 Mar 2015

February 2015
Halfeti and Hasankeyf, Turkey

The ancient village of Hasankeyf, located in southeast Turkey is said to be one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. Situated on the banks of the Tigris river, this picturesque village has settlement activity and artifacts pre-dating the Mesopotamian era. However, in 2015, that history, and the entire village, is set to be drowned when South West Anatolia (GAP) Dam project activates its latest installment and creates a large water reservoir that will engulf the village.

The villages inhabitants have been fighting the Turkish government for years, trying to cling onto their ancestral lands. However, it looks like their struggle is coming to an unsuccessful end and they are set to be relocated to a newly built village overlooking the old one.

If government plans move forward, Hasankeyf will face the same fate of the village of Halfeti, another ancient town located nearby on the Euphrates river. Halfeti's homes and ruins are now buried under the water reservoir of the Birecik Dam, also part of the GAP project. With the villages traditional livelihoods all but erased, the inhabitants have abandoned agriculture in place of lake tourism and moved to new homes either nearby or in the cities.

This story profiles the contemporary struggle of Hasankeyf through the eyes of one of its inhabitants. It also foreshadows the possible future for Hasankeyf by visiting the village of Halfeti, which has already been submerged by dam waters.

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Desperate Living Conditions in Rebel-...
Jobar
By abdalmanamissa
26 Feb 2015

Jobar, Syria
February 26, 2015

The Damascus suburb of Jobar has been transformed into a devastated ghost town after more than more than two years of heavy battles between government and opposition fighters have failed to bring decisive victory to either side.

The very few civilians who remain in the neighborhood gather broken doors and furniture from wrecked homes to provide firewood.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

R-L pan of destroyed building
Traveling of road
Traveling of tunnel
Traveling of three children amid destruction
Various traveling of streets
Various of man chipping wood
Various/ traveling of roads
Wide of two women walking amide destroyed buildings
Various/ traveling of roads
Wide of destroyed building
Wide/ zoom in of two children carrying wood
Various of men sitting around a fire
Wide of fighters
Close-up of axe chopping wood
Wide/ zoom out of men carrying large bags

04:00 – 04:47

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Ahmed, a fighter in Jobar Neighborhood

“As you can see, there are no civilians. There is no firewood nor any other means of heating. There is no electricity or diesel. All of this disappeared a long time ago. [NAT Sound: Heavy gunshot]. People come under shelling and shooting as they gather firewood. They take wood from wrecked houses and cut down trees – anything that can be used to provide heating because there is no diesel. People of all ages are doing what it takes to manage. They come all the way from over there. God, not us, is protecting them. They gather some firewood and then leave. The situation is extremely tragic. It is more difficult for civilians than it is for us.“

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed fighter in Jobar Neighborhood
04:48 – 05:36

“As you can see, dear brother, the situation is deplorable. People suffer from the lack of fuel and other basic necessities needed for heating and cooking. People are using wood from homes, which, as you can see, have been bombed, especially in Jobar. There are many destroyed homes. In general, Jobar has entirely been destroyed. People use any available wood from doors, window shutters and furniture. Everything is ruined and people go out to gather wood to provide heating for their children and prepare food. People undergo a lot of risk while doing this, under shelling from rockets and from warplanes.”

Wide of smoke rising as a result of bombing

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Controversial Dam Project Threatens P...
Janna
By Suzanne Baaklini
18 Feb 2015

Nahr Ibrahim, Lebanon

Febraury 9, 2015

The construction of a dam in the area of Janna, Lebanon, is causing wide controversy among local residents, ecologists and even certain politicians. Janna, whose name means ‘paradise’ in Arabic, is a picturesque valley near Ibrahim River in north Lebanon, which hosts a rare ecosystem according to ecologists. Concerned Lebanese fear that this project will ruin the natural site without succeeding in retaining water. Geologist Samir Zaatiti warns that the surface on which the dam is being built covers large pits that absorb water. There are also fears that the project might threaten the water source that feeds the Jeita Grotto, a submerged cave known as a tourist destination. Preparations for the construction have started and many trees in the areas have been cleared. Despite its rich water resources, Lebanon has struggled with a water distribution crisis due to the lack of adequate infrastructure.

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Aleppo's Decaying Public Works
Aleppo
By Abdu al-Fadel
31 Aug 2014

August 15, 2014
al-Ansari District, Aleppo, Syria

Workers in Aleppo's rebel-held al-Ansari sector fight to maintain what is left of the area's basic services, including electricity, water, and sanitation, after much of it has been pulverized by the war. Lack of materials, fuel, equipment, money and expertise are the result of heavy shelling and a near total lack of funding and support from outside sources.

Shot List:
Various shots of the broken equipment
Various shots of the bombed equipment
Various shots of the conditions of the electricity infrastructure in the sector
Various shots of the conditions of the water infrastructure in the sector

Transcript:

Local resident responsible for water infrastructure:

“We do not get water here. We get water for one day every 10-15 days and our job is to provide water for the shops and people who do not have water. Thank God, we are able to fulfill the needs of people as much as we can”.

Local resident responsible for electricity:

“We need many tools and equipment. We need oil, which is the most important thing to get the generator to work, and we have to check it constantly and refill it with oil, which is very hard to get. What we do is, if there is another generator that is completely broken and unable to be fixed, we pump the oil out of it and we use it in other generators. However, there are so many generators that need oil, like those in Salah al-Din, al-Zebdeyye, al-Sukkari, and many others.

We are the group responsible for the electricity in al-Ansari sector; we received a complaint today from the Salah al-Din area that the cables have melted and caused a power cut. We are three workers in the areas of Salah al-Din, Jesr al-Khaj, al-Zebdeyye, and many more; we are facing many difficulties and dangers, such as snipers and barrel bombs, we are facing many dangers. And other than the dangers, we do not have tools or equipment, we have nothing, we are trying to work using minimal tools that we can get our hands on, but we do not have anything to help or support us.

A few days ago, we had a man who was working to fix an electricity problem when something exploded and burned his whole face. So we face a lot of dangers, and we do not have anything, we need insulations, lamps, we do not have the tools we need. We face a lot of dangers, but hopefully it will all pass”.

Local maintenance worker:

“Here in al-Ansari sector, we try to fix and reuse the tools, the tip carts, and the tractors that were destroyed by the shelling. It is very difficult for us to find spare parts, we do not have them in this area and we are forced to get them from far places, sometimes from regime controlled areas. We have so many tractors and tip carts that are not working because the spare parts are not available. We also lack funding, we asked so many parties to help us, such as the city committee and the province committee. We ask people inside and outside to support us with a little bit of money, a minimal amount comparing to what they send to the other sectors. We wish from the whole world to see us and to see how we are working, all of the workers here do not exceed the number of 30 workers who take minimal salaries, but still they are managing. The men here are very cooperative and they understand that we are in a war situation, and that we do not have any material or funds. We are dealing with a man named Abu Bashir, who is the president of the sector, and a military party have contributed a bit to pay the salaries of the workers, along with the committee. We hope for more cooperation because, at any minute, the al-Ansari sector could fall apart because of the lack of funding. The city and the province committees are refusing to cooperate with us”.

Abu Bashir Kabbani, president of al-Ansari sector:

“Here we are in the al-Ansari sector, a part of the western sector of liberated Aleppo. We provide many services, such as sanitation, water, electricity. We also provide water tanks because the water here is always cut off. We are facing many difficulties, such as the lack of money. Whenever we want to fix our equipment that was ruined because of the shelling we cannot because we do not have any funds, or the mechanical aspect is not available, or the spare parts are not available. We try to find those spare parts and we spend 10-20 days looking for them and we cannot find them. For example, we have a crane that has been broken for 20 days and we are looking for a spare part to fix it and cannot find it. We have tip carts that we cannot fix because we do not have any spare parts. What has affected us the most is the shelling because it has destroyed all of the machinery.

We have 60 machines in the sector and only 3 or 4 of them are [still] working. The main reason is the shelling and the second reason is the workers. Whenever there is shelling, they stop working. The third reason is the mechanics, we do not have any mechanics here to fix the machines and there is no funding or support. We are doing the best we can and until this moment, we have not taken one day off. With all of the shelling, we did not take a day off, and we work 24/7, we have shifts all the time. There is also something else that we did not mention. When a barrel bomb is dropped we go out to clean the streets as much as we can whenever we have the machinery to do that.

Concerning the complaints, we have an office for the complaints for water and electricity and also for the sanitation. We have a record, a citizen comes and files a complaint, we take information about him and his area and we try to fix the problem. For the electricity we are always quick to fix it, but for the sanitation issue [like garbage collection] there are specific times. For electricity, because there is a shortage already, we try to help the citizens as much as possible, and we are trying to provide a longer period of electricity usage for the citizens. Hopefully it will work.
We have four main jobs here in the sector: providing electricity, providing water, maintaining water tanks, and maintaining sanitation services”.

“We are the sanitation services, we have four workers, and we are working, we are lacking machines. The machines we have are very old and we need funds. Everyday we fill 13-14 trucks; we work in al-Mashhad, Salah al-Din, eastern Ansari, al-Zebdeyye, al-Sukkari, our salaries are minimal, and our machinery is old, but we are patient and we only ask for funds”.

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Generating Electricity in Damascus' S...
By Jawad Arbini
02 Jul 2014

July 01, 2014
Hamoureya town, Damascus, Syria

A year and a half has passed with electricity being completely turned off in Eastern Ghouta. This inspired Abu Yaarob to turn bicycles into electricity generators that are able to generate up to 500 lumens which can run a washing machine, a television or electric tools. This method became widespread and now shops have reopened after closing due to the lack of electricity.

Shot list:
A television working through the bicycle
A washing machine working through the bicycle
A power tool working through the bicycle

Interviews

Abu Thaer - One of the people using the bicycle:
"Electricity has been off here, in eastern Ghouta, for over a year and a half, so the men in Ghouta had to turn the old electric bicycle that we used in the days of the regime into an electricity generator that can generate up to 220 volts that we can use to power a television and to charge 15 mobile phones, and to charge the battery lamps and to turn on a regular lamp and a washing machine. As you can see we will connect a lamp and a mobile phone and we used a three-way plug and as we start turning the pedals you see the lamp lights and the mobile phone starts charging.

Abu Kassem - An owner of a car repair shop who uses the bicycle:
Here I am a metal worker and because we have no electricity I am using the bicycle. We are generating electricity and working and we do not care about Bashar or anyone else, and God is with is, and we will win for sure.

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Ghouta Under siege
Syria
By Jawad Arbini
09 Apr 2014

Video shot in the month of December 2013 depicting conditions in eastern Ghouta, an area near Damascus under the control of Syrian rebels.
Includes the following elements:
- Artillery and aerial bombing strikes on buildings in Ghouta. - Damage to buildings from the bombing strikes. - Sand bags and barrels to protect against bombing strikes. - First aid class teaching women how to treat the wounded and prepare medications. - Pushing cars and riding bicycles because of a shortage of gasoline. - Using bicycles to charge car batteries for electrical power - Using windmills to create electricity. - Corn husks, kernels and beans to be ground into flour for bread. - People clamoring to buy bread in a bakery. - Cooking on fires in the street. - Chopping firewood to burn for heat. - Transporting water to homes.

Shot list:
1- Kids looking to the military jet
2- Jet striking
3- Airstrike hitting a building
4- Airstrike hitting a building
5- Smoke coming out of a stroke building
6- Airstrike to a building
7- Airstrike to a building
8- Airstrike to a building
9- Smoke coming out of a stroke building
10- Sand bags in front of some shops
11- Rocket hitting a building
12- A shop with some rocks replacing the front door glass
13- A window with plastic shelters replacing the glass
14- Broken pieces of glass on the street
15- A rocket hitting an building
16- A rocket hitting an building
17- A rocket hitting an building
18- Sand bags and barrels in front of a shop
19- Sand bags and barrels in front of a shop
20- Sand bags and barrels in front of a shop
21- A damaged building with a man standing on the balcony
22- Broken windows of a building
23- Broken windows of a building
24- Broken pieces of glass on the street
25- Broken windows of a building
26- Sand bags in front of a shop
27- Barrels in front of a shop with a broken front door glass
28- Some people coming in to the shop protected by barrels

29-Sound bite - Abu El Fowz – grocery store owner
I am the owner of this shop and because of the large number of customers we had to fortify the place with barrels in order to protect them, protect the children and protect ourselves. Many people died in front of my shop so we set this protection so that people coming in will be protected.

30-Sound bite - Abu Thaer – Factory employee
We are pretty much used to the shelling these days. Before when a shell hit, or there was gunfire or the security forces were invading you could see everyone running for shelter. Now people don’t care as much, what is there more than death? Death occurs once. We are being shelled daily, a couple of days ago a Mig plane hit us over there. Here are the streets; this is our daily life, film as much as you want no one really cares anymore. What more is he going to do to us? He tried to hit us with Rocket launchers, Scud missiles and Mig planes and he couldn’t defeat us, he will not be able to defeat us. God’s will is above all of this.

31-Abu Mohammad – plumber
Despite all the shelling that West Ghouta witnessed, forty shells a day, with missiles and warplanes we are not concerned. Our main concern is to break the siege over West Ghouta; our concern is the piece of bread we have to secure for our children. He can shell as much as he wants; just break the siege so we can feed the children.

32- medical equipment
33-A woman taking notes
34-A woman preparing a natural medicine out of honey and some creams
35-First aid trainer giving medical tips to some women
36-First aid trainer giving medical tips to some women
37-Women attending a first aid training session
38-First aid trainer giving tips to some women
39-Women attending a first aid training session

40-Sound bite - First Aid Trainer
If a man gets hit by a sniper in front of me, what can I do for him? As first aid, we have to stop the bleeding. I put gauze on the places of entrance and exit of the bullet, and then I wrap an ace bandage tightly around the wound. That is all I can do. I can't do anything but wrap his wounds tight with gauze and ace bandage to stop the bleeding.

41-Sound bite – A trainee trying to apply some of the tips she just learned
We empty the needle from bubbles. Then after arranging the head we empty the air that's inside. We divide the heart into four parts; we take the upper right chamber. We put in in the catheter fully, and then apply pressure with a finger here so the blood won't pour out. We pull off its cover and pull it out and the catheter will be ready. Then you tape it from both sides.

43- Man walking while he’s pushing his bike and a taxi car (out of oil)
44-Man walking with his bike holding a sack that contains vegetables
45-Kid trying to produce electric field out of his bike
46-Men on their bicycles
47- A man trying to fix an electric wire
48-A man fixing an electric wire in a battery
49-A man placing electric wires
50-A battery connected to a bike through electric wires
51-A man rolling the bike pedals to recharge the batteries
52- Men rolling the bike pedals to recharge the batteries
53-Boys rolling the bike pedals to recharge the batteries
54-Boy rolling the bike pedals to recharge the batteries
55-Boys rolling the bike pedals to recharge the batteries
56- Handmade Fan that uses wind to generate electric field
57- Handmade Fan that uses wind to generate electric field
58-tilt down for the handmade Fan that uses wind to generate electric field
59-Shavers connected to a battery
60-A bakery using the handmade fan to generate electricity and turn on the light
61-The wind is turning the fan connected with wired
62-Fan in function
63- Fan in function
64-lamps in the ceiling
65-lamps connected to batteries
66-Some people in a crowded shop shouting and trying to get bread
67-Some people in a crowded shop shouting and trying to get bread
68-Some deserts made out of milk on a table in the street
69-Cooker over rocks and fire in the street
70-A boy cooking some food in the street
71-Beet being boiled in water
72-Peel of corncobs
58-Man peeling the corncob
59-Peel of corncobs
60- Man cutting wood
61-Man cutting wood with a tree branch in the foreground
62- low angle shot for the street with rocks and snow in the foreground
63-Cabbage on the floor
64-Corn grinder in function
65-A sign that locates the grindery
66-A hand showing grains
67-corns
68- grinded corns
69-flour made out of corncob peel and corns
70-Men pushing a barrel filled with water

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Alternative Electricity in Aleppo
شارع السليمانية, حي السليمانيه, Aleppo, Mount Simeon, Aleppo Governorate, Syria
By Mhammad Darwish
01 Nov 2013

Aleppo, Syria
November 2013

As a result of a power shortage, residents of rebel-held parts of Aleppo have resorted to buying electricity from local providers, who operate large generators. Video includes an interview with a generator owner, shots of generators and makeshift electric grids, as well as general scenes from the streets of Aleppo.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
22 Sep 2013

L’uranium nigérien permet d’éclairer une ampoule française sur trois, tandis que seul un Nigérien sur dix a accès à l’électricité. Le 20 septembre, l’Etat sahélien a lancé un audit des mines d’uranium détenues par Areva, afin que l’exploitation du minerai contribue d’avantage à son développement.

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Niger, a Dark Paradise of Uranium
Niamey, Niger
By Transterra Editor
05 Sep 2013

An unsteady bike headlight and a kid eager to escape from his mother’s arms can easily turn into a tragedy. Because when night shows up, only the headlights of the cars furtively light up the faces of Niamey’s inhabitants.

In the rural areas of Niger, where more than 83 percent of Nigeriens live and less than 2 percent of the inhabitants have access to electricity, people have to sleep at 8 p.m. because, by then, it is already dark and there is no electricity. With a blistering 48 degrees in summer and barely any electricity to turn on a fan, the people of Niger live in “darkness, warmth and insecurity,” says activist of Right of Energy organisation.

The national rate of access to electricity in Niger does not exceed 10 percent, while France lights up almost one third of its light bulbs from Uranium it extracted from Niger. Niger’s contract with Areva, which France owns 80 percent of, is expected to be renewed by the end of 2013 and currently, negotiations are underway.
The government is looking for Niger's best interest, rather than France's, as the Nigerien Minister of Mines says, “natural resources must serve our country’s interests.” This is particularly important, since the country has been ranked as the least developed country when it came to UNDP’s index of human development.

It was announced that a new mine pit will soon be open and, starting from 2015, 5000 tons of uranium will be extracted from it each year. This mine, however, was attributed to Areva in 2009, and so far, all subcontractors in the project have been foreign. Nevertheless, it has been stated that this mine will contribute to the development of Niger in the fields of health, eduction, transportation, water and access to energy. Civil society activists are skeptic of this project and have been taking measures such as organizing debates and forums and surveying the behavior of new investors, in order to ensure that they receive what they have been promised.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 12
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

A shack that serves dinner is announced by a neon light above a row of cooking put full of rice and leaf sauce. Here, Malian migrants after the night meal, Niamey.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 3
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

After the night’s prayer, reading of Koran under the white neon of a shop, Niamey.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 13
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

In front of his shop where he sells cigarettes and tea, Ibrahim tells time with small swallow of sweet green tea.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 8
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

A family sat down for a diner on a laterite road, shined by a torch made in China. Yantala, Niamey.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 4
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

A cow lighted up by the headline of a bike in the black night of Niamey. 83,3% of Niger inhabitants live in rural areas, where less than 2% have access to electricity.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 11
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

At sunset, the inhabitants of Niamey gather under the unusual light bulbs which break through obscurity.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 2
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

Bike repairs under the white neon of one of the rare bookshops of the city-center of Niamey.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 10
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

Furtive outline of a young veiled girl in the dark night of Niamey, only lighted on by the headlines of a car. Only 10% of Niger’s inhabitants have access to electricity.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 7
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

A Nigerien makes his ablutions before the night’s prayer in a common courtyard of Niamey. His sun makes out his gestures in the darkness.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 6
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

Prayer, a major event that occurs in the dark in a society where more than 95 percent of the people are Muslims.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 5
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

From afar, itinerary sellers look like huge fireflies. When one comes closer, he can gradually make out the shape of their wheelbarrow carrying cigarettes, drugs imported from Nigeria, China and India… An entire bazaar illuminated by a torch made in China.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium 1
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
05 Sep 2013

An ice-cream seller below a white neon in Niamey. Without electricity, ice-cream is an utopia and his fridge is empty.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
04 Sep 2013

Biba would like to know what happened to her father, who died 40 days after her birth in 1986. He spent 10 years driving trucks in Somair, Areva's uranium mine of Arlit.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
04 Sep 2013

Three former workers of Areva's uranium mine in Arlit. On the foreground, Mamane Sani, a quarry worker for twenty years, is today paralyzed down his left side.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 2
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
03 Sep 2013

De loin, les marchands ambulants ressemblent à des lucioles géantes. Plus on se rapproche d’eux, plus on devine les cigarettes et les médicaments importés du Nigéria, d’Inde ou de Chine... Le tout éclairé par une lampe… fabriquée en Chine.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 6
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
03 Sep 2013

Evènement majeur de la vie quotidienne de cette société à plus de 95% musulmane, la prière se passe souvent dans le noir une fois la nuit tombée.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 8
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
03 Sep 2013

A la tombée de la nuit, les habitants de Niamey se concentrent sous les rares ampoules qui percent l’obscurité.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 7
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
03 Sep 2013

Réparation de moto sous les néons de l'une des rares librairies du centre-ville de Niamey.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 1
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
03 Sep 2013

La nuit sans lumière donne à l'existence des Nigériens quelque chose de vulnérable, d’éphémère. Comme si leur vie pesait moins que celle des citoyens bien éclairés sous les lampadaires publics.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 5
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
03 Sep 2013

Une famille attablée sur un chemin de latérite, pour un dîner éclairé par une lampe torche fabriquée en Chine. Quartier Yantala, Niamey.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 8
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
03 Sep 2013

Devant sa boutique de cigarettes et de thé, Ibrahim égrène le temps à lampées de thé sucré.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 4
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
28 Aug 2013

Les inégalités d’accès à l'énergie sont à l’origine des différences de développement entre un Nigérien et un Français. Ce dernier peut surfer sur Internet, prendre le TGV et le métro ; autant de services refusés au Nigérien lambda », dit Moustapha Kadi, président du Coddae.

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Niger, dark paradise of uranium
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
25 Aug 2013

Nigerien uranium lights up one-third of French bulbs, meanwhile only one-tenth of Nigerien have access to electricity. On September 20, the Sahelien State launched an audit of the uranium mines owned by French company Areva on his soil, so that the ore extraction finally benefits to Nigerien’s development. An initiative backed by its population. Thousands of citizens demonstrated the 12th of October to denounce the "radioactivity contimination" provoked by Areva and its lack of interest for local development. Report.

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Niger, paradis obscur de l'uranium 3
Niamey, Niger
By Emmanuel Haddad
21 Aug 2013

Une vache éclairée par le phare d'une moto dans la nuit noire de Niamey.

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Sri Lanka - Protest Against an increa...
Colombo , Sri Lanka
By chamilacolombo
23 May 2013

Members of Sri Lankan Marxist People's Liberation Front, hold Placards as they shout slogans during a protest march in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Thursday, May 23, 2013. Hundreds of Marxist supporters protested against an increase in electricity charges and demanded an immediate reduction. Sri Lanka has raised electricity charges from last month in a bid to recover huge losses incurred by the state-run electricity utility

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Sri Lanka - Protest Against an increa...
Colombo , Sri Lanka
By chamilacolombo
23 May 2013

Members of Sri Lankan Marxist People's Liberation Front, hold Placards as they shout slogans during a protest march in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Thursday, May 23, 2013. Hundreds of Marxist supporters protested against an increase in electricity charges and demanded an immediate reduction. Sri Lanka has raised electricity charges from last month in a bid to recover huge losses incurred by the state-run electricity utility

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Sri Lanka - Protest Against an increa...
Colombo , Sri Lanka
By chamilacolombo
23 May 2013

Members of Sri Lankan Marxist People's Liberation Front, hold Placards as they shout slogans during a protest march in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Thursday, May 23, 2013. Hundreds of Marxist supporters protested against an increase in electricity charges and demanded an immediate reduction. Sri Lanka has raised electricity charges from last month in a bid to recover huge losses incurred by the state-run electricity utility, Placards Read “Don’t Cheat Reduce Electricity charges immediately”

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Sri Lanka - Protest Against an increa...
Colombo , Sri Lanka
By chamilacolombo
23 May 2013

Members of Sri Lankan Marxist People's Liberation Front, hold Placards as they shout slogans during a protest march in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Thursday, May 23, 2013. Hundreds of Marxist supporters protested against an increase in electricity charges and demanded an immediate reduction. Sri Lanka has raised electricity charges from last month in a bid to recover huge losses incurred by the state-run electricity utility

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Sri Lanka - Protest Against an increa...
Colombo , Sri Lanka
By chamilacolombo
23 May 2013

Members of Sri Lankan Marxist People's Liberation Front, hold Placards as they shout slogans during a protest march in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Thursday, May 23, 2013. Hundreds of Marxist supporters protested against an increase in electricity charges and demanded an immediate reduction. Sri Lanka has raised electricity charges from last month in a bid to recover huge losses incurred by the state-run electricity utility