Thumb sm
Star Wars Premiere in Bangkok
Bangkok
By GonzaloAbad
18 Dec 2015

The Bangkok premiere of 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens' was held at the Siam Paragon shopping mall in the Thai capital.

Thumb sm
Star Wars Premiere 01
Bangkok
By GonzaloAbad
17 Dec 2015

Catering and cocktail event at the The Bangkok premiere of 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens' at the Siam Paragon shopping mall in the Thai capital.

Thumb sm
Star Wars Premiere 02
Bangkok
By GonzaloAbad
17 Dec 2015

A Thai artist draws a character from the movie at the The Bangkok premiere of 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens' at the Siam Paragon shopping mall in the Thai capital.

Thumb sm
Star Wars Premiere 03
Bangkok
By GonzaloAbad
17 Dec 2015

Signage for the Bangkok premiere of 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens' held at the Siam Paragon shopping mall in the Thai capital.

Thumb sm
Eric Lartigau and Louane Emera attend...
Tokyo, Japan
By hiroko tanaka
27 Jun 2015

French director Eric Lartigau and French actress and singer Louane Emera attend stage greeting during Film Festival 2015 at Yurakucho Asahi Hall on June 26 2015 in Tokyo, Japan.

Frame 0004
Racy Egyptian Films Persist in the Fa...
Beirut
By Cherine Yazbeck
29 Jan 2015

Beirut, Lebanon

January 29, 2015

After the death of Arab film icons Faten Hamama and Sabah earlier this year, cinema fans revived the memories of what many describe as “la belle époque,” which dated from the 1950s till the mid-1970s.

During this golden age, budgets and standards were considerably high and the progressive state ideology promoted the production of films that were successful throughout the Arab world. This wave benefited from cultural interaction between different Arab societies, a seemingly endless cache of amazing talents and the blessing of a dedicated audience. More significantly, movies reflected liberal societies.

Aboudi Abu Jaoudeh, the director of Al-Furat publishing house, is a collector of Arab film posters. Through this collection, one can understand the prevailing mentality at that time. He explains that since the mid-1970s, filmmakers have steered away from showing explicit content as a result of pressure from producers from the Arabian Gulf.

A recent audiovisual performance titled Gharam wa Intiqam (Love and Revenge), designed by artist Randa Mirza and rapper Wael Kodaih, known as Rayess Beik, revives Arab cinema’s golden era. The show, which is still running in alternative venues, incorporates electronic music into scenes from some of the most iconic Egyptian, Lebanese, and Syrian movies.

This video includes an interview with Sadek Sabbah, a famous Lebanese cinema producer and distributor of Egyptian and Lebanese movies whose company, Sabbah Art Production, was a main contributor of cinematic production in the 1960s and 1970s. He analyses how social change in Egypt has affected the movies and discusses the influence of Islamists on public freedom in Egypt.

Shotlist and Transcript

1 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abboudi Abou Jawdeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House
00:00 – 01:17
I am focusing my interest on Lebanese cinema. I want to archive [the relevant material] accurately.
I love this poster. It features Sabah. Many posters were inspired by Western ones. This one was shows an influence of the movie Gilda, starred by Rita Hayworth. They have reproduced the exact same poster in Lebanon.
When James Bond movies were out, there were spy movies in Lebanon, too. When musical films were produced abroad, musicals were also produced [in Lebanon]. The same trends that appeared in the 1970s… When erotic movies were produced, the same took place in Arab countries and Lebanon between 1970 and 1972 or 1973. The same trends in world or Arab cinema were echoed [in Lebanon]. These trends had a worldwide effect. This includes all aspects [of cinema], from designing poster to producing the movie. This also affected people’s lives.

2 Various of Abboudi Abou Jawdeh examining posters

3 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abboudi Abou Jawdeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House

01:31 – 08:18

01:31
This movie… this poster dates from the 1940s. This is how they designed posters.
In the 1970s and 1980s – the late 1970s and early 1980s – especially when video and new technology appeared, people were able to take movies to their homes. At that time, funding from Saudi Arabia or the Gulf in general was channeled into production. This funding forced its own requirements on production. It imposed certain limits. There was a large-scale consumption of cinematic work, or movies in general, through new broadcasting media; there were new TV stations as well as video.
This financial capital bought a large part of old movies and financed new movies. It laid down new models for work. For example, [investors] require that certain scenes or topics do not appear. There were certain molds that had to contain these movies. Movies that were produced until the 1970s were modified to suit the new display rules. All the kisses were removed from movies, as well as all scenes that were deemed unacceptable. Movies that are being currently shown and that were produced in 1950s, 1960s and 1970s are disfigured.
It was a rare for a director to be able to take control of his own movie. Even earlier, in the 1950s and 1960s, there were directors who suffered in their work and their movies were even censored. They used to be paid per movie. They would receive a certain fee, for example 6,000 or 7,000 Egyptian pounds and would not ask about the movie later. Some producers were in need of money.
I started collecting… one usually has a favorite actor or actresses. I started collecting their photos and posters. After the show, I used to ask workers in the movie theater if there were any posters [that I could take]. I started collecting posters of Western movies. I continued this collection, and later I was interested in cinema magazines, especially in the 1970s… in the early 1970s. Cinema was the main source of entertainment in Lebanon at that time. People from all social classes used to go at least five or six times a year to the movie theater.
When she [Um Kulthum] died, they filmed her funeral and showed part of that footage [in the cinema].
Al-Haram (The Sin) was a movie produced in 1968. It was based on a novel by Youssef Idriss. It is a beautiful story about a female peasant who was a raped by another peasant and did not dare to say anything about it. She did not even tell her husband about this. She died while giving birth. This story is very tragic and can really be described as a story with a social interest. It shows women’s suffering in our Arab societies.
The changes… now there are restrictions that actors, directors, or producers apply to avoid being held accountable. It is not the people who would hold them accountable. [A producer would say,] “I have paid one or two million dollars to produce a TV series; I do not want the government to ban it if I did not remove this or that part.” Producers avoid any trouble to be able to make a profit.
06:42
This poster was designed by artist Hilmi al-Touni. I think that it expresses very beautifully what the movie is about. All the black color… the background represents death while she represents life. The movie’s illustration is done beautifully.
07: 13
Look at this poster. Imagine that this poster was printed in 1955. This is one of the first movies starred by Hind Rustom.
This kind of magazines was printed in Lebanon in 1960s and even in the 1970s. This magazine was distributed in Arab countries. It is called Cinema and Marvels. It was indeed a marvelous magazine!
Interviewer: Do you think it would be possible for such magazines to be printed again in the Arab world?
- No, it is not possible. Some of [these models] were Arab. You would be able to find Arab dancers on magazine covers. It was normal.

4 Various of Metro al-Madina theatre hall and cabaret

5 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Randa Mirza, Artist
08:44
“Our show is called Love and Revenge, the title of a movie starred by Asmahan in 1944. The entire show is based on replaying Arabic songs that date from the 1930s till the 1960s. It features Egyptian, Lebanese and Syrian movies from the same period.“

  1. Various of show. NAT Sound: Music.

7 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician
09:25
“I wanted to revive these songs with a new spirit so that I and other people rediscover them. In remixing these songs, I incorporated electronic music. I changed the beat and the length of the songs. The song now has a new face, a new spirit.”

  1. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Randa Mirza, Artist
    09:55
    “When we return to that era, we realize that we had a great cinematographic and musical production, which had simplicity, aesthetics and experience that now have been lost. We want to bring this era back. Then we would perhaps be able to say, “See where we were and where we are now.”

9 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician and Rapper
10:20
“There is a political, economic and artic void. There is a big void in the Arab world.”

10 Wide of posters in Metro al-Madina

11 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Aurelien Zouki, Spectator
10:40
It is really important that they worked on Egyptian movies. This shows our situation back then and what we have now reached. This difference is a bit scary.

12 Various of show. Scenes taken from Kaborya, starred by Ahmadn Zaki and Raghda (9:14).
Scenes feature dancer Tahiya Karioka. Soundtrack , song by Warda al-Jazairiya (11:08); Dancer Samia Jamal (11:39); scenes from film Abi Fawqa al-Shajara, starred by Abdel Halim Hafez and Samia Jamal; soundtrack, Tindam by Widad; film starred by Sleiman Eid

13 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Sadeq Sabbah, Owner of Sabbah Art Production
15:11 – 18:36

I think the change is due to the fact that people’s mindset was affected by the Islamic tide. Part of this was negative. This negative part affected people. It affected their social habits and way of life, which has to do with cinema, what they eat or drink, as well as going out. It has to do with everything. It is not specifically related to cinema. If, in Lebanon for example, I wanted to say that cinema is the mirror of society… I feel that cinema currently is not the mirror of society. If you look at 10 women in the street, you will see that nine of them wear the hijab. However, if we looked at women in Egyptian movies, the ratio would be reversed. Maybe one tenth of them wear a hijab.
Lebanon embraced Egyptian cinema approximately from 1965 to 1975. They [Egyptian filmmakers] discovered three things in Lebanon. First of all, Lebanon is a large studio where there is great scenery. There is the sea, mountains and a nice climate. Media services in Lebanon were – and still are – very distinguished. Egyptians discovered that film production was easy in Lebanon. In addition to that, there were Lebanese actors and actresses present in Lebanon, which complemented Egyptian cinema. More importantly, distribution originated in Lebanon. The distribution revenues were funneled into Lebanon, which created an economic cycle during these 10 years. This facilitated film production. I feel nostalgic about the movie Nagham fi Hayati (A Life Melody), starred by Farid al-Atrash. First of all, I followed my parents work while they produced this movie. Secondly, there was a horrible incident. Farid al-Atrash died during two days before the end of filming, but they [the crew] were able to come up with solutions. It might also have to do with the fact that this was the last movie made in Lebanon – we were talking about these movies made between 1965 and 1975. After that the war broke out. I always have this movie in mind and I always love to watch it. Also, It featured a large group of Lebanese actors, such as Shoushou. There was a large Lebanese cast in this movie. It also featured classical scenery in Lebanon, such as Baalbek, Byblos, the cable cart, which was very important back then. It also featured Tyre. It was as if there Egyptian cinema was bidding Lebanon farewell.

Frame 0004
Racy Egyptian Films No Longer Mirror ...
Beirut
By Cherine Yazbeck
29 Jan 2015

Beirut, Lebanon

January 29, 2015

After the death of Arab film icons Faten Hamama and Sabah earlier this year, cinema fans revived the memories of what many describe as “la belle époque,” which dated from the 1950s till the mid-1970s.
During this golden age, budgets and standards were considerably high and the progressive state ideology promoted the production of films that were successful throughout the Arab world. This wave benefited from cultural interaction between different Arab societies, a seemingly endless cache of amazing talents and the blessing of a dedicated audience. More significantly, movies reflected liberal societies.
Aboudi Abu Jaoudeh, the director of Al-Furat publishing house, is a collector of Arab film posters. Through this collection, one can understand the prevailing mentality at that time. He explains that since the mid-1970s, filmmakers have steered away from showing explicit content as a result of pressure from producers from the Arabian Gulf.
A recent audiovisual performance titled Gharam wa Intiqam (Love and Revenge), designed by artist Randa Mirza and rapper Wael Kodaih, known as Rayess Beik, revives Arab cinema’s golden era. The show, which is still running in alternative venues, incorporates electronic music into scenes from some of the most iconic Egyptian, Lebanese, and Syrian movies.
This video includes an interview with Sadek Sabbah, a famous Lebanese cinema producer and distributor of Egyptian and Lebanese movies whose company, Sabbah Art Production, was a main contributor of cinematic production in the 1960s and 1970s. He analyses how social change in Egypt has affected the movies and discusses the influence of Islamists on public freedom in Egypt.

Shotlist and Transcript

1 Various of Aboud Abu Jaoudeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House, examining film posters

2 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Aboud Abu Jaoudeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House

Cinema was the main source of entertainment in Lebanon at that time. People from all social classes used to go at least five or six times a year to the movie theater.
Could you imagine that this poster was printed in 1955? This is one of the first movies starred by Hind Rustom.
This kind of magazines was printed in Lebanon in 1960s and even in the 1970s. This magazine was distributed in Arab countries. It is called Cinema and Marvels. It was indeed a marvelous magazine!
Interviewer: Do you think it would be possible for such magazines to be printed again in the Arab world?
No, it is not possible

4 Various of Metro al-Madina cabaret and movie theatre

5 Wide of screen in audiovisual show Gharam wa Intiqam (Love and Revenge); scene from Kaboria, starred by Ahmad Zaki and Raghda.

6 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician

“I wanted to revive these songs with a new spirit so that I and other people rediscover them.”

7 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Randa Mirza, Artist

“We want to retrieve the aesthetics and experience that now have been lost. We want to bring this era back. Then we would perhaps be able to say, ‘See where we were and where we are now.’”

8 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician

“There is a political, economic and artic void. There is a big void in the Arab world.”

9 Wide of posters in Metro al-Madina

10 Various of show; Dancers Tahiya Karioka, Samia Jamal. Soundtrack, Batwannis bik by Warda al-Jazairiya

11 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Sadeq Sabbah, Owner of Sabbah Art Production

“People’s mindset was affected by the Islamic tide. Part of this was negative. This negative part affected people. It affected their social habits and way of life, which has to do with cinema, what they eat or drink, as well as going out. It has to do with everything. It is not specifically related to cinema. If, in Lebanon for example, I wanted to say that cinema is the mirror of society… I feel that cinema currently is not the mirror of society.”

Thumb sm
Mg 31
Beirut
By AmmarParis
01 Oct 2014

French Member of Parliament Julien Dray arrives to the screening of "Sils Maria" movie at Abraj movie theatre, as part of Beirut International Film Festival, in Beirut, Lebanon, on October 1st, 2014. Photo by Transterra Media

Frame 0004
Eyes Wide Shut Masks
Venice, Italy
By Filippo Biagianti
23 May 2014

Rialto, Venice. In a short but remarkable workshop, in 1985 Franco Cecamore has created two original masks for the Venice Carnival. Twelve years later, a man with white coloured men's clothing, came to that shop: the man was Jan Harlan, executive producer of one of the last movies directed by Stanley Kubrick. He visited "Il Canovaccio" in order to buy several masks. One of them would be used by Kubrick in his last masterpiece "Eyes Wide Shut" for the character of Dr. Bill Harford, played by Tom Cruise. This documentary is the incredible and unknown story behind the creation of the most important masks of "Eyes Wide Shut." The artisans of this typical Italian product say that the origin of the art makes it a unique product. Original documents, photographs and the description of the meeting with the Kubrick's production make this the story we tell in our film.

Thumb sm
Red Carpet interview with Ibinabo Fib...
Yenagoa, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
08 May 2013

Ibinabo Fiberesima is one of the popular actresses that rocked the Nigerian movie industry in the 90s. She was also a beauty queen. The soft-spoken actress was elected the first female president of the Actors’ Guild of Nigeria last year and has since committed much efforts in transforming the guild.

H264 Media interviewed her on the Red Carpet of the African Movie Academy Awards

Thumb sm
Manual Labour
Yenagoa, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
08 May 2013

A woman chopping down cassava plants from the proposed site of the 1st Film school In Yenagoa, Bayelsa, Nigeria

Thumb sm
Unemployed youth roaming the street o...
Lagos, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
07 May 2013

Nollywood film industry the world's third largest film industry resides in Nigeria, churning out approximately forty to fifty low budget movies per week and employs over half a million young people.

Thumb sm
Screen shot interview with Tony Abulu
Abuja, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
07 May 2013

Tony Abulu is the president of Filmmakers Association of Nigeria, U.S.A. and also the writer, producer, director of Back To Africa and Dr Bello-A Hollywood-Nollywood collaboration

For over 20 years, Tony Abulu has been the C.E.O. of Black Ivory Communications, a multi-faceted media firm based in New York. Black Ivory Communications serves as consultants to African governments on tourism, as well as American companies doing business in Africa.

Abulu has produced numerous cultural presentations in America, including the spectacular Nigerian National Troupe and the Africa Music festival in New York.

I caught up with Mr Abulu in Abuja nigeria and he gave us a candid interview on the state of Nollywood

Frame 0004
Hollywood Versus Nollywood, Trailer
Lagos, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
04 May 2013

Hollywood Contra Nollywood By Tee Jay Dan
APRIL 23, 2013 2 COMMENTS

“Critics should be active participants…propound and participate.” BM Dzukogi.

Nothing said in praise of Nollywood, in whatever fashion or design will invalidate the fact that the industry is threatened with poor funding, low quality production, technical ineptitude, piracy and blighted distribution channels. But we must not dwell on the many sins of Nollywood. We should appraise the industry; analyze her with the genuine hope of rediscovering her lost beauty. We must, stakeholders and consumers alike, collectively and jealously trade ideas and criticism; serve as a galaxy of souls to our very own motion pictures enterprise. I am playing my quota by writing this article in hopes that every reader will play their role by spreading the word until the identified defects are righted!

Here’s a little education on how a proper film industry functions. Top on the chain is THE MONEY nearly bracketed by THE FINDERS.

THE MONEY is further categorized into FILM and TV. The FILM category consists of major studios such as Universal, Disney, Warner Brothers e.t.c, whereas the TV category refers to Cable Networks such ABC, FOX, CBS e.t.c. Like every other business, these studios and Networks are structured with CEOs, Presidents, Creative Executives, Assistants and Business Affairs Executives.

THE FINDERS literally refers to professionals who find talents/stories for the studios/networks. The Finders serves as mediators between studios/networks and the products. Since studio execs are too preoccupied to read through heaps of specs/scripts these guys handle the hunt job. They function just like literary agents in the business of publishing.

It is the collation of these two factions; THE MONEY and THE FINDERS that makes up what is known as Hollywood. There is more to the solid structure of Hollywood but this will suffice for lack of space. Sadly, Nollywood strives on the exact the opposites of these dictates! There is no single Studio in Nigeria! The absence of a skeletal framework is Nollywood’s first and major problem. With a functional structure in place, Nollywood will look sexier to potential investors as investment returns will become guaranteed – only then can we bury the old days of financially constrained productions.

It is funny how the lots of producers in Nollywood believe funding to be the most pressing need that must be remedied if the industry is to be revitalized. They often find out albeit painfully so that even with the billions of the world they cannot make mind blowing movies with only money. In this business of ours it is believed that a good film could be made with a bad cast and poor production but no good film can be made with a bad story. There is no gainsaying the fact that our home videos are pretty predictable because the stories made into films are stereotypes! Any good screenwriter could easily hash out two or more stories from a typical Nollywood flick! Do you feel mentally exhausted after seeing a Nollywood film? This is because your brain is busy trying to patch together the unrelated stories/scenes in our home videos. Our producers need to pay closer attention to stories before they give the green light. Here’s an assignment: watch a Chinese, Bollywood or Hollywood movie without the sound then watch a Nollywood film in the same manner – watch the Nollywood clip first if you like. Then return here and share your experience. Please pick films you have not seen before and remember to mute the sound. Yes, that is the power of a good story of the lack thereof!

Recently I joined camp with Balogun Omo Oba Dayo of Ravernsbourne UK; a Nigerian Filmmaker based in the United Kingdom. In the course of our joint venture I learned a great deal. Nigerians making good movies are either independent producers or our brethren in the Diaspora. Movies like DR. BELLO, LAST FLIGHT TO ABUJA, TWO BRIDES AND A BABY, THE LOST NUMBER by Tony Abulu, Obi Emelonye, Blessing Egbe and Kester Nsirim respectively are clear examples. Oh, there are three kinds of filmmakers in Nigeria; the Nollywood filmmakers, Nigerian Filmmakers in the Diaspora and the Independent filmmakers. It is therefore out of good faith that I propose a conscious romance between these three factions of Filmmakers of Nigerian origin.

Funding is a crucial part of filmmaking especially in Nigeria. Here’s a bitter truth. Over 80% of filmmakers in Nigeria source for production money from marketers in Alaba. These marketers go as far as dictating names for films without reading the scripts! Have you noticed some Nollywood flick with a title that clearly conflicts with the storyline? Now you know why. A similar percentage of the technical crew are a bunch of ‘trial and error’ apprentices who self-graduated or were actually sent forth by their ‘masters’ to wreck Nollywood the more. The camera man you hire for your birthday today might be shooting Nollywood’s next ‘block buster’ tomorrow if he knows a producer or if a friend of his wins a lottery and decides to make a movie. As much as lack of funds is a problem, industry veterans should sign up for professional courses. It doesn’t take a lifetime!

We still suffer some shamefully from poor sound and picture quality in Nollywood. Take the just concluded AMAA 2013 event for instance.

Finally, because Nollywood churns out thousands of movies annually is not a yardstick to say it is without blemish. Popularity isn’t necessarily prosperity so goes the saying. A female Nollywood apologist argued that the industry guys are making big bucks alright hence do not need to up their game. This is laughable. See, in Nigeria pirates earn more than the filmmakers. Forget the paparazzi, safe for some side ‘runs’ our movie stars will be dying in penury. To say Nollywood is fine as it is is a terrible misconception. Let’s have a working structure then we can attract investors. Let’s build a tight knit industry and engage in collaborative ventures so we can make superb movies. Deal with Nigerians in the Diaspora, tackle piracy and pirates head on, mend the rift in AGN, and awaken DGN and SWG from slumber then watch Nollywood bloom.

Thumb sm
Screenshot from Nollywood Director La...
Lagos, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
15 Apr 2013

Lancelot Oduwa Imasuen has worked in the film industry since 1999 mainly as a film director and producer. He is best known as one of the founding figures of Nollywood cinema. He has Directed over 200 Nollywood films. I caught up with Lancelot whilst taking a rare break from the production of his latest flick Nogbaisi Ovonramwen

Thumb sm
Famous British Actor Matthew Macfadye...
Tbilisi, Georgia
By U.S. Editor
12 Jan 2013

Famous British actors Matthew Macfadyen and Myanna Buring visit Georgia to participate in film Epic, an international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia.

As it is mentioned in official press release of the Georgian National Film Center, Tbilisi-based Production Company 20 Steps Productions shoot Epic – international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia. EPIC is supported by the British Film Institute (UK), the HessenInvestFilm fund (Germany), Metra (Russia), and the French-German cultural channel Arte, as well as the Georgian National Film Centre.

Thumb sm
Famous British Actor Matthew Macfadye...
Tbilisi, Geirgia
By Ketevan Mghebrishvili
12 Jan 2013

Famous British actor Matthew Macfadyen visits Georgia to participate in film Epic, an international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia.

As it is mentioned in official press release of the Georgian National Film Center, Tbilisi-based Production Company 20 Steps Productions shoots Epic – international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia. EPIC is supported by the British Film Institute (UK), the HessenInvestFilm fund (Germany), Metra (Russia), and the French-German cultural channel Arte, as well as the Georgian National Film Centre.

Thumb sm
Famous British Actor Matthew Macfadye...
Tbilisi, Georgia
By Ketevan Mghebrishvili
12 Jan 2013

Famous British actor Matthew Macfadyen visits Georgia to participate in film Epic, an international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia.

As it is mentioned in official press release of the Georgian National Film Center, Tbilisi-based Production Company 20 Steps Productions shoot Epic – international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia. EPIC is supported by the British Film Institute (UK), the HessenInvestFilm fund (Germany), Metra (Russia), and the French-German cultural channel Arte, as well as the Georgian National Film Centre.

Thumb sm
Famous British Actor Matthew Macfadye...
Tbilisi, Georgia
By Ketevan Mghebrishvili
12 Jan 2013

Famous British actor Matthew Macfadyen visits Georgia to participate in film Epic, an international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia.

As it is mentioned in official press release of the Georgian National Film Center, Tbilisi-based Production Company 20 Steps Productions shoot Epic – international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia. EPIC is supported by the British Film Institute (UK), the HessenInvestFilm fund (Germany), Metra (Russia), and the French-German cultural channel Arte, as well as the Georgian National Film Centre.

Thumb sm
Famous British Actor Matthew Macfadye...
Tbilisi, Georgia
By Ketevan Mghebrishvili
12 Jan 2013

Famous British actors Matthew Macfadyen and Myanna Buring visit Georgia to participate in film Epic, an international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia.

As it is mentioned in official press release of the Georgian National Film Center, Tbilisi-based Production Company 20 Steps Productions shoot Epic – international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia. EPIC is supported by the British Film Institute (UK), the HessenInvestFilm fund (Germany), Metra (Russia), and the French-German cultural channel Arte, as well as the Georgian National Film Centre.

Thumb sm
British-Georgian film Epic is shootin...
Tbilisi, Georgia
By Ketevan Mghebrishvili
12 Jan 2013

British producer Mike Downey and director Ben Hopkins shoot new film Epic in Georgia. The film is an international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia.

As it is mentioned in official press release of the Georgian National Film Center, Tbilisi-based production company 20 Steps Productions will shoot Epic, an international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia. Epic is supported by the British Film Institute (UK), the HessenInvestFilm fund (Germany), Metra (Russia), and the French-German cultural channel Arte, as well as the Georgian National Film Centre.

The film is a co-production between London-based producers Film and Music Entertainment led by Mike Downey and Sam Taylor, Daniel Zuta’s Frankfurt located Brandstorm Entertainment, Metra Films’ Artem Vassiliev in Moscow and Tbilisi’s 20 Steps owned by Vladimer Katcharava.

The list of international cast includes Matthew Macfadyen as Emil Forester, whose performance as Darcy opposite Keira Knightly in Pride and Prejudice is the stuff of cinematic legend. Opposite him plays the heroine of the latest Twilight – Breaking Dawn mega-franchise, Myanna Buring as love interest and heroine Tulpan. German actor Richard van Weyden takes centre stage playing himself and also the founder of the Karastani nation.

Epic is a gentle black comedy about a confused, washed up Academy Award winning British director Emil Forester, who is invited by a nascent state to make a national Epic in an obscure Caucasus Republic. When Emil Forester receives an invitation to the Embassy of the Autonomous Republic of Karastan in London to discuss his career and to receive an invitation for a retrospective of his films in ‘Karastan - Land of Inspiration’, little did he know that he would be embarking on one of the wildest journeys of his already diverse and colorful career.

Thumb sm
Famous British Actor Matthew Macfadye...
Tbilisi, Georgia
By Ketevan Mghebrishvili
12 Jan 2013

Famous British actor Matthew Macfadyen visits Georgia to participate in film Epic, an international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia.

As it is mentioned in official press release of the Georgian National Film Center, Tbilisi-based Production Company 20 Steps Productions shoot Epic – international co-production between the UK, Germany, Russia and Georgia. EPIC is supported by the British Film Institute (UK), the HessenInvestFilm fund (Germany), Metra (Russia), and the French-German cultural channel Arte, as well as the Georgian National Film Centre.

Frame 0004
2012 Tribeca Film Festival - Premiere...
New York, USA
By Genesis Broadcasting Network (TTM-TV1)
21 Apr 2012

Exclusive Russian-language interview of Alina Orlova and Sunsay, Russian Media Stars featured in the documentary 'Russian Winter', premiered at the 2012 TriBeCa Film Festival

Frame 0004
2012 Soho International Film Festival...
New York, USA
By Genesis Broadcasting Network (TTM-TV1)
20 Apr 2012

Exclusive Interview with Danny Aiello, iconic personality of the American Cinema, recorded at the 2012 Soho International Film Festival on April 19, 2012.

Frame 0004
2012 Soho International Film Festival...
New York, USA
By Genesis Broadcasting Network (TTM-TV1)
14 Apr 2012

Exclusive Interview with Russ Camarda, starring in the Fred Carpenter Film, "The Night Never Sleeps", recorded at the 2012 Soho International Film Festival New York Premiere on April 13, 2012

Frame 0004
2012 Soho International Film Festival...
New York, USA
By Genesis Broadcasting Network (TTM-TV1)
14 Apr 2012

Exclusive Interview with Dan Brennan, Stephanie Finochio, and Russ Camarda, all starring in the Fred Carpenter Film, "The Night Never Sleeps", recorded at the 2012 Soho International Film Festival New York Premiere on April 13, 2012