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TALPAPRIL2017-32
London
By Tom Price
23 Mar 2017

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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TALPAPRIL2017-33
London
By Tom Price
23 Mar 2017

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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TALPAPRIL2017-31
London
By Tom Price
22 Mar 2017

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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Amot Ogol
London
By Tom Price
20 Mar 2017

Amot, 19, travelled to Juba by walking barefoot ANDREW HAS STORY ON TAPE

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TALPAPRIL2017-29
London
By Tom Price
18 Mar 2017

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-9
Juba
By alexiawebster
12 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
11 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
11 May 2016

Singer Okuta Ceasar Malis, known as 'Silver X' in his imported Japanese convertible outside his home in Juba, South Sudan.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
10 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
09 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
07 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
07 May 2016

Singer Annet Angaika 'Neetha Baby' on a boat traveling on the White Nile River during the 'Nile Cruise', a party held for young South Sudanese entertainers, artists and entrepreneurs.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
07 May 2016

Singer Okuta Ceasar Malis, known as 'Silver X' (arms raised) stands on a boat traveling on the White Nile River during the 'Nile Cruise', a party held for young South Sudanese entertainers, artists and entrepreneurs.

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Global Refugee Crisis: The Worst Sinc...
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
11 Jun 2015

June 20 is World Refugee Day.

In 2014, global refugee numbers were higher than they have ever been since World War II. In 2015, the problem has only gotten worse.

There are currently over 50 million refugees in the world and more than %50 of them are children. Approximately half of the world's refugees are from just three countries: Afghanistan, Syria, and Somalia.

The response to this massive international crisis has been limited, with most refugee aid programs desperately underfunded. Amnesty International has called the lack of robust international response "A Conspiracy of Neglect." With little help on the way, the future of the world's displaced remains uncertain.

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South Sudan Child Refugees 03
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 11, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - A group of South Sudanese boys play soccer. In response to fighting, which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 04
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 12, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - Achol Gurech Nyok, 24, from Jonglei state (Bor town) in South Sudan, hangs clothing. In response to fighting, which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. Achol and five family members fled after the area where they lived was attacked by rebels in January 2014. "We left running with nothing - we didn't even have time to pack food." It took them two weeks to reach Adjumani, Uganda. The United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) flew them from Jongelei state to Juba and then put them on a bus to Uganda. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 05
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 12, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - South Sudanese refugees wait in line to receive aid at a distribution center. In response to fighting, which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 06
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 12, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - Makal Mawut Abour, 14, from Jonglei state, stands in the entrance of a church (under construction) observing a crowd of fellow refugees waiting to receive aid at a distribution center. In response to fighting, which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 07
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 12, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - A crowd of South Sudanese refugees wait to receive aid at a distribution site. In response to fighting, which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 09
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 13, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - Several South Sudanese boys play a game using bottle caps and rocks they call "End." In response to fighting which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 10
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 13, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - Mary Agok Hida, 27, makes porridge for her family; it's a family of two wives, their husband and nine children. They're from Jonglei state (Twic East County). After being forced to flee because of the war the family of 12 arrived in Uganda in January 2014. In response to fighting which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 12
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 13, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - Children of South Sudanese refugees, who fled their country as a result of war, entertain themselves with a dance called "Daluka." In response to fighting which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of South Sudanese refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 13
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 13, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - Young South Sudanese refugees, who fled their country because of war, entertain themselves with a dance called "Daluka." Once a week they don their best clothing for this social event. However it's not unusual to find children (such as the girl on the right) who have only badly worn or few items of clothing. In response to fighting which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of South Sudanese refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 14
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 11, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - Regina Aker, 11, center, from Malakal state in South Sudan, picks up debris on the grounds of her home. In response to fighting, which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 15
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 11, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - A group of South Sudanese boys play soccer. In response to fighting, which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 16
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 11, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - School children (refugees from South Sudan) loiter on the grounds of their outdoor school; they're waiting to be released for a one-month break. In response to fighting, which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 17
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 13, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - South Sudanese children play a game called "Father or Mother," which involves hopping around a grid. In response to fighting, which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 18
Adjumani District
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 11, 2014 - Adjumani district (Ayilo Resettlement Area), Uganda - School children (refugees from South Sudan) loiter on the grounds of their outdoor school; they're waiting to be released for a one-month break. In response to fighting, which broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, thousands of refugees crossed the border at Nimule into northern Uganda. The fighting was between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 19
Bor County
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 27, 2014 - Bor County (Kondai Village - Makuach Payam), South Sudan - Wal Garang Dhiek, 42, (background - second from right) uses a stick embedded with a stone to keep birds from feasting on his sorghum field, as his family relax (left-to-right: his mother Nyaroor Kok Ajok, 70, wife Ayen Nhial Piel, 25, holding their son Nhial Wal Garang, 7-months, a young neighbor and his son Bil Wal Adhik, 5). Thousand of South Sudanese from this region became internally displaced refugees in Jonglei and Juba following the outbreak of fighting between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar in December 2013. The following is an interview with Wal Garang Dhiek, 42 and his wife Ayen Nhial Piel, 25: Please describe your current situation and the reasons for it. Mr. Dhiek: Life was good prior to the crisis but currently it is not as good. We used to have eight cows and twelve goats; all were stolen by the rebels. The children depended upon the milk from the cows. What is the hardest? Mrs. Piel: Illness is the hardest. The children fall sick and there is no money to see a doctor; they must recover at home. Currently both the baby and my husband's mother are sick. We think the baby may have malaria. His mother is having problems with her back. How has the conflict and the violence affected you and your family? Mr. Dhiek: We had to travel far to seek safety; we fled to Mathinag Island and stayed for three months. We suffered hunger and our barn was burned. The rebels killed my brother who was a soldier. What are your biggest needs at the moment? Mrs. Piel: We need help with the sickness. We can't afford money for medicine. The children need more nutritious food; there's no substitute for the lack of milk. Our main diet is sorghum. Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 20
Bor County
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 27, 2014 - Bor County (Kondai Village - Makuach Payam), South Sudan - Ayen Nhial Piel, 25, prepares a meal. In the foreground are the burned remnants of the family's barn which was destroyed by looting rebels. Thousand of South Sudanese became internally displaced refugees in Jonglei and Juba following the outbreak of fighting between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar in December 2013. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 21
Bor County
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 28, 2014 - Bor County (Malek Village - Kolnyang Payam), South Sudan - This section of a village has remained abandoned since its residents fled attacking rebels in December 2013. Thousand of South Sudanese became internally displaced refugees in Jonglei and Juba following the outbreak of fighting between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar in December 2013. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 22
Bor County
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 28, 2014 - Bor County (Panweel Village - Kolnyang Payam), South Sudan - Refugees gather under a large three to distribute their monthly food rations. Thousand of South Sudanese became internally displaced refugees in Jonglei and Juba following the outbreak of fighting between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar, in December 2013. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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South Sudan Child Refugees 23
Bor County
By ric francis
22 Mar 2015

August 28, 2014 - Bor County (Panweel Village - Kolnyang Payam), South Sudan - Several children gather on the grounds of a food distribution area. Thousand of South Sudanese became internally displaced refugees in Jonglei and Juba following the outbreak of fighting between forces loyal to South Sudan president Salvar Kiir and his ex-vice president Rick Machar, in December 2013. (Photo by Ric Francis)

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Sudan: Surviving Despite the Conflict
Nuba Mountains, South Kordofan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
06 Feb 2015

The Nuba Mountains rise from the semi-arid savannah of South Kordofan, one of the largest states of Sudan bordering what is now the Republic of South Sudan. The population is dominated by over 50 distinct ethnic groups of black African origin collectively known as the Nuba.  Settled small holder farmers, the Nuba have lived alongside a number of Arab pastoralist tribes relatively peacefully for generations. In addition to its remarkably rich and engaging culture, Nuba society is characterised by religious tolerance (there being about equal numbers of Muslims and Christians with many still respecting traditional ancestral beliefs), ethnic diversity and expectations of local accountability and good governance not commonly found elsewhere in the country. It is estimated that as many as three million Sudanese are Nuba, many living in the slums of cities in the north.
 
As with other Sudanese living on the peripheries (including the people of Darfur, Blue Nile, Abyei, Red Sea Hills, and the far north), the people of South Kordofan have been marginalised for generations by the policies of successive Khartoum-based Governments. As a result,  they face restricted educational and employment opportunities, lack of land tenure and huge loss of land to outsider mechanised schemes, social discrimination,  lack of political rights,  banning of local languages from school curricula and ever increasing poverty and frustration.  Failure to bring about any changes through political process and alarm at the undemocratic imposition of Sha’ria law (in 1983) eventually resulted in armed resistance, initially alongside the southern Sudanese insurrection led by Dr John Garang.  In 2005, an internationally brokered “peace agreement” led eventually  to the secession of South Sudan but failed to address the marginalisation of Nuba and other peripheral ethnic groups in (northern) Sudan. 
 
In 2011 the region returned to civil-war  and currently the Nuba opposition are fighting as part of an alliance of northern Sudanese opposition groups resisting the continued oppressive policies of Omar al Bashir’s National Congress Party.  As in Darfur and Blue Nile, the efforts of the Khartoum government to stamp out any opposition have been particularly brutal. An area of some 40,000 square kilometres, home to over a million people, has been effectively surrounded by the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) and Government paid militias deprived of any public services (including markets,  transport, power and telecommunications) or access to international or national humanitarian aid. Civilian villages are bombed and shelled daily, hospitals and schools are targeted, hunger is used as a weapon of war, villages are burnt to the ground and captured civilians are routinely tortured, raped and executed. Several thousands of Nuba have died since the war restarted in 2011, over 400,000 have lost their homes and possessions and remain internally displaced with little or no assistance. More than 80,000 are refugees in camps in increasingly insecure border area of South Sudan and this figure is expected to rise significantly.
 
However, despite all these atrocities, the local population continues to demonstrate enormous resilience and a determination to resist the brutal oppression of Bashir’s regime and to help bring about the democratic transformation of Sudan of which they dream. They dig foxholes to reduce the number of deaths from bombs and shells, share food and shelter, and seek refuge in the mountains.  They continue to celebrate their ethnic and cultural diversity and religious tolerance.  And perhaps most remarkably, they continue to show a real readiness for forgiveness. They talk not of revenge but of reconstruction in a united and peaceful Sudan that promotes pluralism, justice, mutual respect and codependence.
 
In a region riddled with conflict, extremism and instability, the people of the Nuba Mountains provide an all too rare alternative narrative. If they can survive this war, perhaps they will also contribute to a longer-term transformation in Sudan that allows genuine African democracy, peaceful coexistence and pluralism to replace conflict and dictatorship.

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 05
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
06 Feb 2015

A man lies on the ground as a government Antonov aircraft bomb Kauda Town. Communities have learnt that lying down increases their chances of surviving the devastating shrapnel-filled barrel bombs that remain as the most frequently dropped ordinance to date. In the past three and a half years (up to April 2015), the Sudan Air Force has dropped over 3,700 bombs on civilian sites in the Nuba Mountains. (South Kordofan, Sudan)

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People of Nuba Mountains in Sudan 07
South Kordofan, Sudan
By Giovanni Diffidenti
06 Feb 2015

A displaced woman cries at the news of the death of her son Najamadin, 22 years old, killed by government soldiers while he was taking care of the community’s cattle in Dalami County. His brother Abdulbaghi, who was with him, managed to escape and run back to their makeshift home to tell his mother about the sad news. (South Kordofan, Sudan)