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Waiting Out The Airstrikes
Maarat al Numan, Syria
By David Enders
07 Nov 2012

The people of Maarat al Numan comprise a city of 150,000 located strategically on Syria's main highway. Each dawn they leave the city to avoid airstrikes. Some do not escape the danger in time and hardworking neighbors try fervently to dig their bodies out of the rubble during the nighttime when the airstrikes pause.

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In the land of God: the Huaorani trib...
Pastaza Ecuador
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Oct 2012

Cononaco Bameno-Ecuador(South America) October 27th-2012-EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY.
The Huaorani, also known as the Waos, are native Amerindians from the Amazonian Region of Ecuador (Napo, Orellana and Pastaza Provinces) who have marked differences from other ethnic groups from Ecuador. They comprise almost 4,000 inhabitants and speak the Huaorani language, a linguistic isolate that is not known to be related to any other language. Their ancestral lands are located between the Curaray and Napo rivers, about 50 miles (80 km) south of El Coca. These homelands – approximately 120 miles (190 km) wide and 75 to 100 miles (120 to 160 km) from north to south – are threatened by oil exploration. In 1993, the Huaorani, and Quichua indigenous people, filed a lawsuit against Texaco oil company for the environmental damages caused by oil extraction activities in the Lago Agrio oil field. After handing control of the oil fields to an Ecuadorian oil company, Texaco did not properly dispose of its hazardous waste, causing great damages to the ecosystem and crippling communities. And recently, an US oil giant, has been fined $8.6 billion, for causing devastating pollution in large parts of the Ecuadorian Amazon basin, where Huaorani tribe lives. The oil firm Texaco, wich merged with Chevron in 2001, had been accused of dumping billions of gallons of toxic waste into unlined pits in the Amazon’s rainforest and rivers. Tribes indigenous to the area, like the Huaorani, have campaigned for almost two decades against the firm’s actions, saying that the poisonous waste has increased cancer rates, killed wildlife and contaminated water.In the past, Huaorani were able to protect their culture and lands from both indigenous enemies and settlers but the fighting against the multinational oil company, still goes on.
In the last 40 years, they have shifted from a hunting and gathering society to live mostly in permanent forest settlements. In traditional animist Huaorani worldview, there is no distinction between the physical and spiritual worlds, and spirits are present throughout the world. The Huaorani once believed that the entire world was a forest (and used the same word, ömë, for both). The Oriente’s rainforest of Ecuador, remains the essential basis of their physical and cultural survival. For them, the forest is home, while the outside world is considered unsafe: living in the forest offered protection from the witchcraft and attacks of neighboring peoples.
The Huaorani believe the animals of their forest have a spiritual as well as physical existence. They believe that a person who dies walks a trail to the afterlife which has a large anaconda snake lying in wait. Those among the dead who cannot escape the snake fail to enter the domain of dead spirits and return to Earth to become animals, often termites. This underlies a mix of practices that recognize and respect animals, but does not shield them from harm for human use.
Hunting supplies a major part of the Huaorani diet and is of cultural significance. Traditionally, the creatures hunted were limited to monkeys, birds, and wild peccaries. Neither land-based predators nor birds of prey are hunted. Traditionally there was an extensive collection of hunting and eating taboos. They refused to eat deer, on the grounds that deer eyes look similar to human eyes. While a joyful activity, hunting (even permitted animals) has ethical ramifications: “The Huaorani must kill animals to live, but they believed dead animal spirits live on and must be placated or else do harm in angry retribution.” To counterbalance the offense of hunting, a shaman demonstrated respect through the ritual preparation of the poison, curare, used in blow darts. Hunting with such darts is not considered killing, but retrieving, essentially a kind of harvesting from the trees. Spearing wild peccaries, on the other hand, is killing and is practiced with violence and rage.
While never hunted, two other animals, the snake and the jaguar, have special significance for the Huaorani. Snakes are considered "the most evil force in the Huaorani cosmology", particularly the imposing (though nonvenemous) anaconda, or obe. A giant obe stands in the way of the forest trail that the dead follow to an afterlife with the creator in the sky. Here on earth, snakes are a bad omen, and traditionally killing them is considered taboo.
The Huaorani identify deeply with the jaguar, an important and majestic predator in the Oriente province of Ecuador. According to myth, the Huaorani were the descendants of a mating between a jaguar and an eagle. Elders became shamans by metaphorically adopting “jaguar sons” whose spirits communicate medical and spiritual knowledge. In the Huaorani belief system, jaguar shamans are able “to become a jaguar, and so to travel great distances telepathically and communicate with other Huaorani.”
Plants, especially trees, continue to hold a complex and important interest for the Huaorani. Their store of botanical knowledge is extensive, ranging from knowledge of materials to poisons to hallucinogens to medicines. They also relate plants to their own experiences, particularly that of growing. Among trees, certain kinds are auspicious. Canopy trees, with their distinctly colored young leaves and striking transformation as they mature to towering giants, are “admired for their solitary character … as well as for their profuse entanglement” with other plants. Other significant trees are the pioneer species of the peach palm (used for making spears and blowguns, as well as for fruit), and fast-growing balsa wood, used for ceremonial purposes. Peach palm trees are associated with past settlements and the ancestors who live there.
The Huaorani notion of time is particularly oriented to the present, with few obligations extending backwards or forwards in time. Their one word for future times, baane, also means "tomorrow". Spears are the main weapons of the Huaorani culture used in person to person conflict.
Their main hunting weapon is the blowgun. These weapons are typically from 3 to 4 metres long. The arrows used are dipped in curare poison, which paralyzes the muscles of the animal which is hit with it, so that it cannot breathe. Kapok fluff is used to create an air-tight seal, by twisting the fibers around the end of the dart or arrow. The pictures shows two huaorani preparing the birds nest, before the hunting.

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In the land of God: the Huaorani trib...
Pastaza Ecuador
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Oct 2012

Cononaco Bameno-Ecuador(South America) October 27th-2012-EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY.
The Huaorani, also known as the Waos, are native Amerindians from the Amazonian Region of Ecuador (Napo, Orellana and Pastaza Provinces) who have marked differences from other ethnic groups from Ecuador. They comprise almost 4,000 inhabitants and speak the Huaorani language, a linguistic isolate that is not known to be related to any other language. Their ancestral lands are located between the Curaray and Napo rivers, about 50 miles (80 km) south of El Coca. These homelands – approximately 120 miles (190 km) wide and 75 to 100 miles (120 to 160 km) from north to south – are threatened by oil exploration. In 1993, the Huaorani, and Quichua indigenous people, filed a lawsuit against Texaco oil company for the environmental damages caused by oil extraction activities in the Lago Agrio oil field. After handing control of the oil fields to an Ecuadorian oil company, Texaco did not properly dispose of its hazardous waste, causing great damages to the ecosystem and crippling communities. And recently, an US oil giant, has been fined $8.6 billion, for causing devastating pollution in large parts of the Ecuadorian Amazon basin, where Huaorani tribe lives. The oil firm Texaco, wich merged with Chevron in 2001, had been accused of dumping billions of gallons of toxic waste into unlined pits in the Amazon’s rainforest and rivers. Tribes indigenous to the area, like the Huaorani, have campaigned for almost two decades against the firm’s actions, saying that the poisonous waste has increased cancer rates, killed wildlife and contaminated water.In the past, Huaorani were able to protect their culture and lands from both indigenous enemies and settlers but the fighting against the multinational oil company, still goes on.
In the last 40 years, they have shifted from a hunting and gathering society to live mostly in permanent forest settlements. In traditional animist Huaorani worldview, there is no distinction between the physical and spiritual worlds, and spirits are present throughout the world. The Huaorani once believed that the entire world was a forest (and used the same word, ömë, for both). The Oriente’s rainforest of Ecuador, remains the essential basis of their physical and cultural survival. For them, the forest is home, while the outside world is considered unsafe: living in the forest offered protection from the witchcraft and attacks of neighboring peoples.
The Huaorani believe the animals of their forest have a spiritual as well as physical existence. They believe that a person who dies walks a trail to the afterlife which has a large anaconda snake lying in wait. Those among the dead who cannot escape the snake fail to enter the domain of dead spirits and return to Earth to become animals, often termites. This underlies a mix of practices that recognize and respect animals, but does not shield them from harm for human use.
Hunting supplies a major part of the Huaorani diet and is of cultural significance. Traditionally, the creatures hunted were limited to monkeys, birds, and wild peccaries. Neither land-based predators nor birds of prey are hunted. Traditionally there was an extensive collection of hunting and eating taboos. They refused to eat deer, on the grounds that deer eyes look similar to human eyes. While a joyful activity, hunting (even permitted animals) has ethical ramifications: “The Huaorani must kill animals to live, but they believed dead animal spirits live on and must be placated or else do harm in angry retribution.” To counterbalance the offense of hunting, a shaman demonstrated respect through the ritual preparation of the poison, curare, used in blow darts. Hunting with such darts is not considered killing, but retrieving, essentially a kind of harvesting from the trees. Spearing wild peccaries, on the other hand, is killing and is practiced with violence and rage.
While never hunted, two other animals, the snake and the jaguar, have special significance for the Huaorani. Snakes are considered "the most evil force in the Huaorani cosmology", particularly the imposing (though nonvenemous) anaconda, or obe. A giant obe stands in the way of the forest trail that the dead follow to an afterlife with the creator in the sky. Here on earth, snakes are a bad omen, and traditionally killing them is considered taboo.
The Huaorani identify deeply with the jaguar, an important and majestic predator in the Oriente province of Ecuador. According to myth, the Huaorani were the descendants of a mating between a jaguar and an eagle. Elders became shamans by metaphorically adopting “jaguar sons” whose spirits communicate medical and spiritual knowledge. In the Huaorani belief system, jaguar shamans are able “to become a jaguar, and so to travel great distances telepathically and communicate with other Huaorani.”
Plants, especially trees, continue to hold a complex and important interest for the Huaorani. Their store of botanical knowledge is extensive, ranging from knowledge of materials to poisons to hallucinogens to medicines. They also relate plants to their own experiences, particularly that of growing. Among trees, certain kinds are auspicious. Canopy trees, with their distinctly colored young leaves and striking transformation as they mature to towering giants, are “admired for their solitary character … as well as for their profuse entanglement” with other plants. Other significant trees are the pioneer species of the peach palm (used for making spears and blowguns, as well as for fruit), and fast-growing balsa wood, used for ceremonial purposes. Peach palm trees are associated with past settlements and the ancestors who live there.
The Huaorani notion of time is particularly oriented to the present, with few obligations extending backwards or forwards in time. Their one word for future times, baane, also means "tomorrow". Spears are the main weapons of the Huaorani culture used in person to person conflict.
Their main hunting weapon is the blowgun. These weapons are typically from 3 to 4 metres long. The arrows used are dipped in curare poison, which paralyzes the muscles of the animal which is hit with it, so that it cannot breathe. Kapok fluff is used to create an air-tight seal, by twisting the fibers around the end of the dart or arrow. The pictures shows a huaorani woman navigating the cononaco Bameno river on the pirogue.

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DIFFICULT EID FOR SYRIANS & EGYPTIANS...
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
25 Oct 2012

Though Eid is a time for celebration, many Muslims are facing the challenges of economic struggles and war, dampening the holiday spirit. In Syria, families hope for a respite from the violence, while in Egypt storekeepers are hoping for business.

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Concern for Za'atari Camp Refugees Gr...
Za'atari Refugee Camp, Jordan
By Amy Hybels
18 Oct 2012

October 25, 2012 - Za’atari - As Syrians continue to flee their borders, Jordan is hosting more of their neighbors from the north than any other country in the region.

 More than 210,000 Syrians have fled to Jordan since March of last year and according to the UHNCR there are 105,000 either registered or awaiting registration.

However funding requests have not kept pace with the demand for services in the Za'atari refugee camp which as of last week was hosting more than 37,000 Syrians. 

More than 50% of those in the camp are under the age of 18 according to the UNHCR. 

As Amy Hybels reports, concern for the welfare of the refugees continues as winter approaches.

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Illustrating Streamline
Tucson, Arizona
By ST McNeil
10 Oct 2012

Operation Streamline is the U.S. Federal court system response to mass increases in immigration enforcement. Everyday in border cities like Tucson, Ariz., hundreds of migrants apprehended throughout the U.S. are sentenced en masse with scant legal procedures. Criticized as unconstitutional, Streamline sends people to jail or deportation daily.

Off-limits to cameras, journalists ST McNeil and Josh Morgan brought graphic artist Lawrence Gipe to the courtroom to witness and record the "assembly-line." His sketches are the first images ever detailing an opaque border enforcement system.

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Hamas’ Mashaal in Cairo Urges Arab Le...
Saladin Citadel, Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
04 Oct 2012

Hamas politburo chief Khaled Mashaal attended the anniversary celebration of Al-Quds (Jerusalem) liberation on Wednesday evening, October 3, at Saladin Castle in Cairo.

In his statement during the celebration, which was attended by Egypt’s Cultural Minister Mohamed Saber Arab, urged Arab leaders to work on liberating Jerusalem and Al-Aqsa Mosque from the Israelis.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Hamas politburo chief Khaled Mashaal:
“Today, after the Arab Spring uprisings, and after the January 25 Revolution in beloved Egypt, moral support is not accepted or enough. My message is to prepare for the project of liberating Al-Quds (Jerusalem) and Al-Aqsa Mosque, God willing.”

Mashaal added that the Palestinian Authority has to stop pinning hopes on negotiations with Israel, and should resort to pushing away from the negotiation table and turning to resistance as the only way to liberate the Palestinian territories.

He also stressed necessity for putting an end to inter-Palestinian division, mainly between Fatah and Hamas, and work hard to achieve reconciliation and unity.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Hamas politburo chief Khaled Mashaal:
“It is time for turning the table of negotiations, surrender and turn political processes upside down over those who wanted us to be slaves on its dwarf seats. Today, the Palestinian leadership is required, with all its names and factions, to take a large step towards putting an end to division and accomplishing reconciliation.”

The celebration, organized by Al-Quds International Foundation, was dubbed “In the Footsteps of Saladin.”

It included music performances of Palestinian folklore and national songs about Al-Quds.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 3, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 4, 2012
Length: 0:02:34
Video Size: 127 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide external shot, Saladin Citadel in Cairo
2. Wide shot, the stage where the celebration activities were performed
3. Pan left, Hamas leader Khaled Mashaal and other members entering
4. Various shots of Mashaal speech during the celebration
5. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Hamas politburo chief Khaled Mashaal:
“Today, after the Arab Spring uprisings, and after the January 25 Revolution in beloved Egypt, moral support is not accepted or enough. My message is to prepare for the project of liberating Al-Quds (Jerusalem) and Al-Aqsa Mosque, God willing.” 6. Various shots of Mashaal speech during the celebration and the audience cheering
7. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Hamas politburo chief Khaled Mashaal:
“It is time for turning the table of negotiations, surrender and absurd political process upside down over those who wanted us to be slaves on its dwarf seats. Today, the Palestinian leadership is required, with all its names and factions, to make a large step towards putting an end to division and accomplishing reconciliation.”
8. Various shots of the music performance on stage during the celebration
9. Various shots of Mashaal and others watching the performances
10. Pan right, Mashaal and his companions leaving after the celebration

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Amnesty International Urges Morsi to ...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
04 Oct 2012

Amnesty International sent a letter Tuesday, October 2, to Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi urging him to put an end to the “bloody” legacy of repression, torture and violence that have been used against protestors since the popular uprising that toppled Hosni Mubarak’s regime.

Amnesty International highlighted the alleged violations of Egypt’s military and police against protestors over the past 20 months in two lengthy reports.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Nagad al-Bora’y, lawyer and human rights activist:
“I take this report as a claim that has to be seriously investigated. If it is proven that any of the military leaders has been directly involved, he must be tried. They are just like ordinary people who must be tried if they are convicted. They even have to be tried before civil courts, because these were violations against civilians in the streets.”

Amnesty International said that Egypt's new leader had to make reforms to ensure accountability and transparency of the army and the police.
The human rights group’s first reports sheds light on “Brutality Unpunished and Unchecked: Egypt’s Military Kills and Tortures Protesters with Impunity,” and the second deals with the "total impunity" of country's police forces against protestors.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mohamed Zari’, lawyer, human rights activist, head of Arab Organization for Criminal Justice:
“Besides asking President Morsi to punish the criminals for their crimes against the Egyptian people, the two reports also stress the necessity of reforming the judiciary system and presenting the real criminals for trial, whether they are from the police or the military.”

Amnesty International said that since the January 25 Revolution last year, as well as the violence used against demonstrators by Mubarak’s police, repression hasn’t disappeared in post-revolution Egypt, whether from the army or the police.

President Morsi had previously vowed to set up a fact-finding committee to investigate the killings and abuses that took place under military rule, yet the committee has been given little time to gather findings, get information and summon witnesses, Amnesty International said.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 4, 2012 (and archive)
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 4, 2012
Length: 0:02:21
Video Size: 115 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Wide shot, Egyptian Presidency headquarters in Cairo
2- Various shots of President Morsi during a press conference at the Presidential Palace (archive)
3- Various shots of security men and armored vehicles on a nearby bridge (archive, May 2)
4- Medium shot, two armored vehicles with army soldiers in Abbasiya (archive, May 2)
5- Wide shot of protestors marching, shouting "where are the thugs! "We are the revolutionaries" and waving with flags (archive, May 4)
6- Wide shot of massive number of protestors (archive, May 4)
7- Various shots of clashes between protestors and army soldiers, threw stones on each other (archive, May 4)
8- Various shots of army soldiers firing water cannons to disperse protestors (archive, May 4)
9- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Nagad al-Bora’y, lawyer and human rights activist:
“I take this report as a claim that has to be seriously investigated. If it is proven that any of the military leaders has been directly involved, he must be tried. They are just like ordinary people who must be tried if they are convicted. They even have to be tried before civil courts, because these were violations against civilians in the streets.” 10- Various shots of protestors trying to destroy the barbed-wire fence made by the military in an attempt to reach the ministry of defense (archive, May 4)
11- Various shots of clashes (archive, May 4)
12- Pan right shot of protestors carrying an injured man to the ambulance (archive, May 4)
13- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mohamed Zari’, lawyer, human rights activist, head of Arab Organization for Criminal Justice:
“Besides asking President Morsi to punish the criminals for their crimes against the Egyptian people, the two reports also stress the necessity of reforming the judiciary system and present the real criminals for trial, whether they are from the police or the military.”
14- Various external shots of Egypt’s Interior Ministry
15- Various shots of January 25 Revolution, security men using violence and tear gas to disperse protestors (archive: Jan 25, Jan 28, 2011)

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MASSIVE PROTESTS IN BAHRAIN, VENEZUEL...
Manama, Bahrain
By Editor's Picks
04 Oct 2012

Thousands of Bahraini people participated in the funeral of the young man Mohammed Ali Mushaima (23 years old) in Aldaih village, west of the capital Manama on Tuesday, October 2, 2012. Mushaima passed away in detention after his deteriorated medical condition was neglected by prison administration.

Henrique Capriles, Venezuela’s Opposition Presidential candidate, gathered almost a million supporters this past Sunday in Caracas, just four days before the end of his campaign and a week until the Election Day against President Hugo Chávez who has been in the government since 1999 and aspires for a third term. Chavez supporters marched on Saturday, September 22, 2012 in Caracas, to show their support for Chavez in an election that could give him another six-year term.

Egyptian political activists, legal experts, NGO members and human rights activists held a press conference on Wednesday, October 3, to announce the formation of the “Egyptian Constitutional Front," intended to be a new constitution-writing panel to draw a new representative constitution.

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Egyptian Activists Establish “Egyptia...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
03 Oct 2012

Egyptian political activists, legal experts, NGO members and human rights activists held a press conference on Wednesday, October 3, to announce the formation of the “Egyptian Constitutional Front”, which they consider as a new constitution-writing panel to draw a new representative constitution.

They expressed rejection to the current Islamist-dominated constitution-writing panel, which they expect will not fully tackle human rights issues, aiming to place the goals of the revolution in the new constitution.

According to founding members, the Egyptian Constitutional Front aims to draft a democratic constitution based on the principles of citizenship and respect of human rights.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Hafez Abou Seada, Chairman of the Egyptian Organization for Human Rights (EOHR):
“Constitutions are established through agreement even if there is a minority of 10%. They should feel that they are partners of making the new constitution. The big mistake and catastrophe was that the constitution-writing panel was subjected to the majority. The majority is changeable and the constitution governs all Egyptians. Therefore, I believe that the wise people inside the Islamic trend have to return once again to Egyptian national unity.”

They also highlighted the importance of entrenching certain rights into Egypt’s new constitution, including freedom of the press, the right to peaceful protest, and a wide range of economic and social rights.

The attendees expressed rejection of giving the authority to form the constitution panel to the President again in case of the dissolution of the current panel.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – George Ishaaq, political activist and founder of Kefaya Movement:
“We should be careful when we offer the new draft constitution and discuss it with the people. It is Egypt’s post-revolution constitution, so it has to be completely different than that of pre-revolution Egypt.” The current panel was elected by the members of the People's Assembly (the lower house of the parliament) and the Shura Council (the upper house of the parliament) before the dissolution of the People's Assembly.

The panel still faces the risk of dissolution by court order on the grounds that it was drawn up by the dissolved lower house of parliament.

Egypt's Supreme Administrative Court is expected to rule on the constitutionality of the panel on October 9.

Founders of the Egyptian Constitutional Front include former MP Amr Hamzawy, editor in chief of Al Alam Al Youm Newspaper Saad Hagras, board member of Al Wafd Political Party Essam Sheha, and member of the journalist Syndicate Gamal Fahmy.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 3, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 3, 2012
Length: 0:02:07
Video Size: 104 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Wide shot of the press conference, the attendees at the conference hall
2- Various shots of the conference, speakers and the attendees
3- Medium shot of one of the attendees speaking during the conference
4- Medium shot of cameramen filming during the conference
5- Medium shot of Hafez Abou Seada, Chairman of the Egyptian Organization for Human Rights (EOHR) speaking during the conference
6- Wide shot of the attendees at the conference hall
7- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Hafez Abou Seada, Chairman of the Egyptian Organization for Human Rights (EOHR):
“Constitutions are established through agreement even if there is a minority of 10%. They should feel that they are partners of making the new constitution. The big mistake and catastrophe was that the constitution-writing panel was subjected to the majority. The majority is changeable and the constitution governs all Egyptians. Therefore, I believe that the wise people inside the Islamic trend have to return nonce again to Egyptian, national unity.” 8- Various shot of the conference, speakers and the attendees
9- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – George Ishaaq, political activist and founder of Kefaya Movement:
“We should be careful when we offer the new draft constitution and discuss it with the people. It is Egypt’s post-revolution constitution, so it has to be completely different than that of pre-revolution Egypt.”
10- Various shot of the conference, speakers and the attendees

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SYRIA'S HERITAGE SITES; BSM STRIKE; P...
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
01 Oct 2012

Rising concern over Syria's historic world heritage sites prompts scientific, archaeological and religious organizations to call for increased local and international pressure on Syria to stop the destruction of their cultural heritage.

Municipal workers from Barcelona Municipal Services (BSM) called a 24 hour strike today, Monday, October 1, 2012, with over 400 workers demonstrating in the streets of Barcelona in protest against budget cuts, including Christmas bonuses, being implemented in accordance with austerity laws approved by the Spanish government. The workers want to negotiate a solution with Municipal Services that would allow them to recover an economic loss that represents a 14% cut in their wages.

The 30th annual Pharaohs International Rally kicked off on Monday, October 1, 2012 near the Giza pyramids, to the enthusiasm of an international crowd waiting to see which top international competitor will come out ahead. Top contenders for the race include Emirati driver Khalifa al-Mutaiwei and French driver Jean-Louis Schlesser.

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Spanish Embassy in Cairo Calls for Ti...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
26 Sep 2012

The Spanish Embassy in Cairo called on the Egyptian authorities for tight security after Spanish political satire Magazine El Jueves showed in its latest edition on Wednesday, September 26, a caricature deemed insulting to Muslims.

The caricature shows several long-bearded Muslims in a police lineup under the title "But...does anyone know what Mohammad looks like?"

El Jueves' controversial caricature comes following the French Charlie Hebdo Magazine that also published anti-Islam cartoons, causing French embassies and institutions in 20 countries to temporarily close as a precaution against potential backlash.

Mobs of protesters have recently attacked American embassies in some Muslim countries including Egypt, Libya, Yemen and Pakistan.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: September 27, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: September 27, 2012
Length: 0:00:36
Video Size: 29.6 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Various external shots of the Spanish Embassy in Cairo
2. Various medium shots of the Spanish Embassy in Cairo
3. Close up shot of the sign at the gate of the Spanish Embassy reading “EMBAJADA DE ESPANA”
4. Long shot, a security man sitting outside the Spanish Embassy in Cairo
5. Wide shot, the Spanish Embassy in Cairo
6. Wide overview shot of downtown Cairo and River Nile

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BLOODSHED IN SYRIA MUST END ; SYRIAN ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
26 Sep 2012

On Wednesday, September 26, 2012, for the first time in decades that a sitting Egyptian head of state spoke at a UN General Assembly meeting, President Morsi stressed that the bloodshed in Syria must stop, that foreign intervention is not the right solution and he would not rest until the war is ended. He also spoke in support of the Palestinian right to establish an independent state.

There are nearly 73,000 Syrian refugees registered or waiting to be registered by UNHCR in Lebanon, of which 18,000 are on a waiting list and 51% of those are children. Through Save the Children and other programs, funds are being raised to support the thousands of refugee children seeking an education.

Public school teachers in Barcelona protested increasing austerity measures in Spain on Wednesday, September 26, 2012.

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THE BLIND SHEIKH; 14 SENTENCED IN SIN...
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
24 Sep 2012

On Monday, September 24, Ismailia Criminal Court sentenced 14 members of a militant group with the death penalty for attacking a police station in the city of Al-Arish, North Sinai, last year and killing several army and police officers.

With Egyptian President Morsi's visit to New York for UN General Assembly meetings, the family of the blind Sheikh Omar Abdel-Rahman appealed to him to seek the release of the Sheikh, who is imprisoned in the US having been convicted of seditious conspiracy in the World Trade Center Bombing in 1993.

With massive destruction in the city of Aleppo apparent on this street behind Dar Al Shifa hospital, along with a lack of employees due to the ongoing crisis, garbage accumulates threatening the spread of contagious diseases.

The American University of Cairo raised tuition prices by 7%, increasing the cost of education to nearly $25,000 and leading students to stage an ongoing strike that forced the administration to suspend all classes until further notice.

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WHAT'S HAPPENING IN BEIRUT, SYRIA, EG...
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
23 Sep 2012

Hundreds of Lebanese gathered in downtown Beirut Friday, September 21, 2012 to protest the recent insults on the Prophet Mohammed seen in the infamous trailer posted on Youtube, as well as the cartoons in the French publication Charlie Hebdo.

Rebels shoot down government planes, but not quickly enough to stem the flow of refugees to the Turkish border.

Egypt's Supreme Administrative Court ordered the dissolution of Egypt's lower house of parliament based on a prior verdict ruled last June that the elections law that allowed voting-in of parliament members was unconstitutional.

Pro-reform protesters calling for the release of political activists march from King Hussein Mosque in Amman, Jordan, after Friday Prayer.

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Rally In Support Of Hugo Chavez In Ca...
Caracas, Venezuela
By @LatAmSight
22 Sep 2012

Thousands of demonstrators marched this Saturday, September 22, 2012 in Caracas, Venezuela, to show their support for socialist president Hugo Chavez, two weeks ahead of a crucial election that could give him another six-year term, after having been in charge since 1999.
Scores of people traveled from distant places of the country to join the march in Caracas, wearing red to show their support of Chavez. Many of these people are benefit recipients of “Misiones,” a popular, government-sponsored social program to fight poverty using oil export revenue.
(interview 1 – Omar Rangel, optometrist: “What Chavez has done is to vindicate us, to include us in all the social programs. That’s what we have now. That’s why here; years and years will pass and we will still be here for Chavez”) In a particularly tight election, on October 7, Chávez will face opposition candidate, Henrique Capriles Radonski, who denies the alleged official government accusations to eliminate “Misiones” if Capriles is elected. (interview 1 – Telandria Castillo, teacher: “He is not friend of the ‘missions’. He has proven that he doesn’t mind the welfare of the mass but only that of one minority”) Chavez, who has remained in power since 1999 and has been treated recently in Cuba for cancer, is leading many polls with more than a 20% advantage over Capriles.

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India Shut Down: Life hit at many pla...
C-58 Noida up
By newspoint
20 Sep 2012

The day-long nationwide shut down called for by the Left parties and NDA on Thursday, demanding a rollback of the government's decision to hike diesel prices, cap subsidised cooking gas cylinders and allow foreign direct investment (FDI) in multi-brand retail, has hit life in many places and businesses in the country.
The Bhartiya Janta Party (BJP) Youth wing’s activists blocked rail traffic, stopping trains.
 Members of Political parties like Samajwadi Party (SP), CPM, CPI, TDP, BJD, JD (S), Trimul Congress (TMC) All India Forward Bloc and the RSP have plans to organise picketing, demonstrations and court arrest.

Byte: Nitin Gatkari , National President of Bhartiya Janta party (BJP)
“Economic decisions taken by the Congress would impact the poor and labourers, and the party would continue to fight them”. Byte: Salman Khurshid , Law Minister of India Visual & Byte Description:
1-Delhi
2-Lucknow (Utter Pradesh)
3-Jaipur (Rajsthan)
4-Hamirpur (Utter Pradesh)
Byte: Nitin Gatkari , National President of Bhartiya Janta party (BJP)
Byte: Salman Khurshid , Law Minister of India

Date-20 Sept 2012
Country : India
Slug: India Shut Down: Life hit at many places, trains stopped, PM's effigy burnt

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MALAYSIA: PEACEFUL PROTEST; RELIGIOUS...
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
19 Sep 2012

With volatile reactions to the inflammatory Islam-insulting film spanning throughout many Muslim communities, the subject of defaming religion is at the forefront. The issue was addressed by Arab League Secretary-General Nabil al-Araby at a press conference on Wednesday, September 19, joined by other members of the Arab League, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation and the African and European Unions, who are reportedly all working to reaching an agreement against religious defamation.

Meanwhile, young members of the Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party encouraged ongoing protests to the insulting film, however they stressed that keeping protests peaceful is essential to getting the message across.

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Arab League Chief: International Effo...
Cairo, Egypt
By New User Account
18 Sep 2012

Arab League Secretary-General Nabil al-Araby held a press conference on Wednesday, September 19, at the Arab League headquarters in Cairo, where he addressed various issues including the ongoing UN General Assembly meetings, the Syrian crisis and the recent anti-Islam film produced in the United States.

Al-Araby told reporters that the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, the Arab League, the African Union and the European Union are working on reaching an agreement against religious defamation.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Arab League Secretary-General Nabil al-Araby:
“We’re working on it. Thank God, it’s not only the Organization of Islamic Cooperation and the Arab League but also the European Union and the African Union showing interest in this issue to put together the measures to start preparing an international convention prohibiting defaming or insulting religions.”

As for the Syrian issue, Al-Araby detailed the mission of the new UN-AL envoy to Syria Lakhdar Brahimi and his recent visit to Damascus where he met with President Bashar al-Assad, Syrian officials, opposition members, Syrian Free Army members and representatives of civil society organizations.

He added that the Egyptian and the Arab League positions are clear on the issue, demanding Al-Assad to step down.

SOUNDBITE 2 (English) – Arab League Secretary-General Nabil al-Araby:
“I stick to what the resolution of the Arab League pronounced, that what is needed is the beginning of a transitional period which will entail of course a new government – a coalition government or whatever it is. And also the Arab resolution said or issued an appeal to President Assad to step down.”

Al-Araby stressed in the press conference he held before heading to New York to take part in the UN General Assembly meetings, that the reason for the failure in dealing with the Syrian crisis is the international system established since 1945 and the veto used by China and Russia.

He clarified that the Arab League and the United Nations were unable to resolve the Syrian crisis due to the non-cooperation of Al-Assad and his regime and their rejection of all previous initiatives over the past few months.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: September 19, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: September 19, 2012
Length: 0:01:59
Video Size: 97.7 MB
Language: Arabic and English
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Pan left shot, the entrance of the Arab League headquarters in Cairo
2. Various shots of Arab League Secretary-General Nabil al-Araby entering the press conference
3. Various shots of Al-Araby speaking during the press conference
4. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Arab League Secretary-General Nabil al-Araby:
5. “We’re working on it. Thank God, it’s not only the Organization of Islamic Cooperation and the Arab League but also the European Union and the African Union showing interest in this issue to put together the measures to start preparing an international convention prohibiting defaming or insulting religions.”
6. Various shots of the press conference
7. Medium shot, a cameraman shooting
8. SOUNDBITE 2 (English) – Arab League Secretary-General Nabil al-Araby:
“I stick to what the resolution of the Arab League pronounced, that what is needed is the beginning of a transitional period which will entail of course a new government – a coalition government or whatever it is. And also the Arab resolution said or issued an appeal to President Assad to step down.” 9. Wide shot, of Al-Araby speaking during the press conference
10. Wide shot/low angle, the Arab League headquarters in Cairo

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President Morsi and Iranian Foreign M...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
18 Sep 2012

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi held talks with Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi on Tuesday, September 18, in Cairo, where they addressed Egyptian-Iranian bilateral relations as well as various regional issues including the Syrian crisis.

The meeting was attended by Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel.

Iran is part of the four-member “contact group” initiative to solve the Syrian issue; the initiative was called for by President Morsi and it includes Egypt, Iran, Turkey and Saudi Arabia, though Saudi representatives missed Monday’s meeting in Cairo.

Iran is a strong supporter of Syria’s Bashar al-Assad, while Egypt, Turkey and Saudi Arabia demand that the Syrian regime step down.

Story: President Morsi and Iranian FM Discuss Bilateral Relations and Syrian Crisis
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: September 18, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: September 18, 2012
Length: 0:00:34
Video Size: 27.9 MB
Language:
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Various shots of the meeting of President Mohamed Morsi with Iran’s Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi, attended by Egyptian FM Mohamed Kamel Amr
2. Wide shot, Egyptian Presidency headquarters in Cairo

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SPEAKING OF SYRIA - Editor's Picks 1...
Syria
By Editor's Picks
17 Sep 2012

In meetings and press conferences, everyone is talking about Syria and discussing possible solutions to the ongoing crisis. Egyptian President Morsi, along with Foreign Minister Kamel Amr, held talks with the Iranian, Turkish and French Foreign Ministers, touching on the increasing number of refugees, the fate of Bashar Al Assad and the "contact group," consisting of Egypt, Iran, Turkey and Saudi Arabia who have both influence and interest in the outcome of the crisis in Syria. Talks also gravitated toward the recent film on youtube that insulted the Prophet Mohammed and sparked massive protests among enraged Muslim communities.

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Editor's Picks 17 September 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
16 Sep 2012

Nasrallah appears in public to encourage protests against the controversial film insulting Islam that sparked protests throughout Muslim communities worldwide.

New UN Arab League Envoy returns from Syria and meets with the Arab League Chief in Cairo.

Busses and rails provided only the minimal services as employees went on strike in protest against wage cuts and budget reforms.

Lake Katwe salt mine is a source of livelihood to over three thousand people who earn about five dollars a day, laboring in the hyper-saline environment that leaches moisture from their bodies, exposing them to toxic chemicals and creating severe health complications.

Footage from in front of the US Embassay in Yemen where protesters rallied against the film by burning flags, breaking windows and setting fire in the embassy, until security forces pushed them back with gunfire and water trucks.

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Editor's Picks 16 September 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
15 Sep 2012

Cairo Calms Down After Violent Protests

Gunmen Open Fire At Arish Police Department, North Sinai

Morsi & Bashir Discuss Regional Developments Between Egypt And Sudan

Crowds Gathered In Jordan, Shaking Their Shoes At America
Friday Night Unrest At US Embassy In Jordan

Azaz, Syria's northernmost border with Turkey, has seen its share of fighting and now lives with the remnants. Bombed out schools, tanks and factories are whats left for the villagers whose children enjoy playing on the tanks.

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Egypt Security Forces Clear Tahrir Sq...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
15 Sep 2012

On Saturday, September 15, Egypt’s security forces cleared out protesters who have been clashing with security forces for the past four days near the US Embassy. The protests were sparked by anti-Islam movie that insults the Prophet Mohamed.

Security forces cleared the streets leading to the US Embassy in Cairo and Tahrir Square, beating and arresting protesters.

Egypt’s Interior Minister Ahmed Gamal el-Din said as he inspected the area that, “our presence here is to clear the square of people who are breaking the law" "We must preserve the square as a symbol of the revolution. That is the aim of our operation.

People see that it is the right decision made by the police to clear the square and the area around the embassy, as those who clashed with the security forces appeared to be thugs.

The scene on the streets surrounding the clashes is full of debris, broken sidewalks and rubbish.

Clashes erupted again on Friday night with security forces, leaving one killed and tens injured.

Ismail Rashad, 35, was killed by shotgun fire during clashes with security forces near the US Embassy.

According to a statement released by the interior ministry, Rashad was accused in 16 prior cases and was given a year's prison sentence.

US Defense Secretary Leon Panetta called on Egypt's government on Friday to ensure the embassy's safety.

Clashes were initially started late on Wednesday between security forces and protestors outside the US Embassy, leaving around 250 wounded.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: September 15, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: September 15, 2012
Length: 0:01:43
Video Size: 84.9 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Pan right shot of traffic movement at Tahrir square
2- Tilt down shot of policemen spreading at the square
3- Various shots of Egyptian Interior Minister Ahmed Gamal el-Din and other security officials touring the area around the US embassy and the square after forces clearing the area from protestors
4- Pan right shot of massive number of central security forces spreading at the area around the embassy and the square
5- Pan right shot of a police vehicle touring the area around the embassy
6- Various shots of police men spreading at the square
7- Various shots of the security forces clearing the square from protestors by force
8- Various shots of security forces arresting protestors
9- Wide shot of massive fire rising out after protestors throwing security forces with Molotov Cocktails then security responded and dispersed them with force
10- Pan right shot of a car dragging a damaged car after forces cleared the area from protestors
11- Various shots of security forces clearing the area of the square and arresting protestors

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Pope Benedict Cheered by Thousands up...
Baabda Presidential Palace, Lebanon
By U.S. Editor
15 Sep 2012

Thousands of Lebanese greeted Pope Benedict XVI as he headed on his Popemobile to the Baabda Presidential Palace where he met with the country's top political and Muslim religious leaders on Saturday, September 15.
Crowds of people were waving both the Vatican and Lebanese flags and cheering as he passed with confetti swirling in the air.
In the Beirut suburb of Baabda where there was a festive atmosphere on the streets, the Pope first met with Lebanese President Michel Suleiman and his wife.
The Pope also met with Speaker Nabih Berri and Prime Minister Najib Miqati.

Pope Benedict calls on Lebanon to be a model of peace and religious freedom in the tumultuous Middle East.
During a speech, the Pope expressed sympathy with youth in Syria. The pope said he admired their courage, adding this is a time for Christians and Muslims to come together "so as to put an end to violence and war."
He also called for interfaith unity in order to end violence in the Middle East.
The visit of the Pope to Lebanon is aimed at bridging the gap between Christians and Muslims in the Middle East.
The pontiff, who arrived on Friday for a three-day visit, praised Lebanon as an example of “coexistence and respectful dialogue between Christians and their brethren of other religions” when he arrived at the airport.
Hezbollah's leader Hassan Nasrallah also welcomed the Pontiff's arrival in Lebanon, describing the event as "historic and extraordinary.”

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: September 15, 2012
Shooting Location: Beirut, Lebanon
Publishing Time: September 15, 2012
Length: 0:02:13
Video Size: 109 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Various shots of thousands of Lebanese lined the road as Pope Benedict XVI headed on his Popemobile to Baabda palace where he met with the country's top political and Muslim religious leaders
2. Various shots of the crowds waving with both the Vatican and the Lebanese flags as he passed
3. Pan left shot of the Pope arriving at the Presidential Palace where he met by cheering of the crowds of people
4. Medium shot of the pope arriving at the Palace and a man greeting the Pope upon his arrival
5. Various shots of the ceremony
6. Various shots of the Pope during the ceremony
7. Wide shot of thousands of Lebanese gathering at the ceremony, greeting the arrival of the Pope
8. Close up shot of Lebanese President Michel Suleiman
9. Wide shot of crowds of people during the ceremony

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Citizen Paparazzi Informants in South...
Seoul, South Korea
By maltekol
15 Sep 2012

South Korean School Teaches Neighbors To Spy On Neighbors
Law-breakers in South Korea, beware.
Citizens who videotape illegal activity are on the loose and making extra income by selling the tapes to the police.
But some observers say a school that trains these citizen spies is turning neighbour against neighbour.

Ji Soo-hyun leads a double life. Starting six-months ago the housewife began a career catching lawbreakers red handed. The 54-year old says her specialty is going undercover at private tutoring schools.

INT: (Korean) Ji Soo-hyun, Citizen Paparazza
“I pretend that I am going to enroll my kids in the school. I ask the faculty about extra services. There are a lot of illegal activities in these schools, like staying open too late and charging additional fees. These are the types of things I record.”

When Ji is on her mission, she uses a small, concealed camera she hides in her bag. She is one of several hundred citizens who have been trained to record secret video of other people and businesses that break the law.

(Video Courtesy of Seoul Paparazzi School) This video was taken at a pharmacy in Seoul. Another citizen spy recorded the cashier that didn’t charge for a plastic bag, which is required by law in South Korea.The cameraman, as well as Ji Soo-hyun, are students of the Seoul paparazzi school.Here they learn the ins and outs of taking undercover video. They can try out tiny cameras that are disguised as jewelry. And they are taught which illegal activities can make them the most money if reported to the authorities.

Moon Seong-ok has run the paparazzi academy for 14 years. He helps his students find buyers for their secret footage.

INT: (KOREAN) Moon Seong-ok, Director, Seoul Paparazzi School
“The students who come here want to make money. I contact them with police agencies, local governments, health agencies and education authorities who pay them.”

Moon claims citizen paparazzi can earn between 20 and 30,000 dollars a year.But some other citizens are concerned that money is turning neighbors into spies. Koo Ja-kyoung describes himself as an ordinary guy who is alarmed at what paparazzi students are doing to his community.

INT: (KOREAN) Koo Ja-kyoung, Seoul
“I was just walking around one day and I saw an old lady crying. I asked her what was wrong and she told me she had to pay a fine because she put out the garbage using an unauthorized plastic bag. She said that a citizen paparazzo took a picture of her and gave it to the police.”

Koo says he was so upset with that woman’s story that he filed a complaint with the National Human Rights’ Commission.
That was several years ago and according to the Commision, until now Koo it’s the only person to complain about citizen paparazzi. The Commission has yet to decide whether or not to hear the case. Its not that South Koreans don’t care about this alleged spying, it’s that they are afraid to speak out against it.

That’s according to Chun Sang-chin, a sociologist at Seoul’s Sogang University. He says most citizens don’t like what the paparazzi do.

INT: (KIREAN) Chun Song-chin, Sogang University
“There is a certain cultural sensitivity here. People are worried that if they come forward and complain then others will think they are actually doing something wrong or illegal. They want others to think that what they do privately is as good as what they do publically, so they stay quiet about these things.”

Chun says the government should stop paying for these secret videos.

INT: Chun
“The government is outsourcing its responsibilities to the citizens. Everyone knows that is wrong. But if you look at Korea’s political history, of dictatorship, it just isn’t a concern for most people. I think it would be hard to create a public debate about the paparazzi”

So for now, South Koreans will do their best to keep their private lives behind closed doors. Moon Seong-ok of the Seoul paparazzi school says he feels no shame about what he or his students do.

INT: (KOREAN) Moon Seong-ok, Director of Seoul paparazzi School
“Good citizens who abide by the law like what the paparazzi citizens do. But for those who break the law, they are the ones who are uncomfortable with what my students do.”

Citizen paparazza Ji Soo-hyun agrees. She says she does not feel sympathy for people breaking the law.

INT: (KOREAN) Ji Soo-hyun, Citizen Paparazza
“At first I felt guilty about reporting on these people, but the more I did it, I realized how much illegal activity is going on around us. These people are not poor or struggling to make a living, so I do not feel bad about reporting on them.”

Ji says she is now turning her camera on people who skip out on paying their taxes.

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Editor's Picks 15 September 2012
middle East
By Editor's Picks
14 Sep 2012

Warm Welcome For Pope Benedict XVI In Lebanon

US Embassy In Tunis On Fire; One Killed During Protest In Tripoli, Lebanon

Security Clears Areas Around US Embassy & Tahrir Square, Makes Arrests

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Editor's Picks 13 September 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
12 Sep 2012

Demonstrations continue in front of the US Embassy in Cairo, with clashes breaking out between police and protesters including a constant volley of smoking tear gas canisters. Bahraini religious figures protest as well, though keeping their demonstration non-violent. About a hundred Tunisians protested on Wednesday, September 12, in front of the US Embassy, shouting anti-American slogans and burning American flags.

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Editor's Picks 12 September 2012
Cairo, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
11 Sep 2012

Hundreds of demonstrators gathered in Cairo Tuesday, September 11, 2012, shouting anti-American and anti-Israeli slogans along with "there is no God but Allah," and scaling the US Embassy's walls to pull down the American flag. The protests come in response to an inflammatory trailer to a film called "The Innocence of Islam," posted on youtube, which reportedly depicts the prophet Mohammed as a homosexual pedophile. While people's anger in Egypt propelled them to protest at the US embassy in Cairo, in Libya, enraged mobs attacked the US consulate in Benghazi. The US Ambassador to Libya and three staff members were killed during the attack. In this exclusive video, interviews with local Egyptians and protesters illustrate their religious sentiment, for a full transcription click here.

8:15: "I am Sabir Shartout from Giza, and when I heard about the protest I was one of the first people to confirm my attendance-- it's the least one can do. It is a protest to express the people's anger. This situation is in need of investigation. To those who insulted the prophet: he is the greatest symbol of Islam and he is the root of existence for all Muslims, for all Muslims are alive to love their God and their Prophet. It is really hard and painful for our people and people like us to have to go through those situations. Do we, as people, really deserve this insult? As Muslim, do we really deserve this humiliation? Someone has insulted a symbol, a great symbol that gives meaning to my whole life, and that is the Prophet Mohamed (PBUH). Why are they doing this?"

After the Tunisian Minister of Education Abdul Latif Obaid deducted 100 dinars (63$) from the wages of junior high school teachers who protested in May, the General Union of Tunisian Workers organized a demonstration with many of the teachers and trade unionists from different parts of the Republic.

Massive Demonstration For Independence of Catalonia

Angelina Jolie Meets With PM Mikati & Visits Syrian Refugees In Lebanon

Kandil: Egypt's Budget Deficit Higher Than Anticipated

Discussing Syria:
Arab League Chief Meets With Britain's Hague
& Arab League Chief and Envoy Meet With Qatari PM

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PM Kandil: Budget Deficit Unexpectedl...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
11 Sep 2012

Egypt’s budget deficit for this fiscal year unexpectedly rose up to USD 28.71 billion as it was previously estimated to reach USD 21.98 billion, Egyptian Premier Hesham Kandil said in a press conference following a Cabinet meeting on Wednesday, September 12, at the Cabinet headquarters in Cairo.
Kandil added that such a large burden of deficit would force government to resort to borrowing.
Egypt has already requested a USD 4.8 billion loan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF).
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egypt’s PM Hesham Kandil:
“The EGP 175 billion (USD 28.71 billion) deficit is more than expected. Last year, the budget deficit was expected to reach EGP 134 billion (USD 21.98 billion) but it has become EGP 175 billion. This increase in budget deficit burdens us to have to make up for it through borrowing.” Kandil told reporters that borrowing has to be side by side with increasing national and foreign investments, noting that the government targets 4.5% growth rate this year, which requires investments of about USD 45.28 billion.
SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egypt’s PM Hesham Kandil:
“We are working on settling the budget deficit as one of the courses. The other course, which is relevant, is to increase investments, whether they are national or foreign investments. The targeted growth rate is from 4% to 4.5% by the end of this year, which, according to the government’s plan, requires investments of EGP 276 billion (USD 45.28 billion).” The Egyptian Prime Minister noted that the IMF loan to Egypt would reassure the world economic institutions about the Egyptian economy and its ability to pay off debt, stressing that the economic reform program is 100% national regardless of the IMF loan.
Kandil finally called on the Egyptian people to work with the government to avoid any further burdens to the country’s budget by refraining from workers’ protests that lead to closing companies and factories.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: September 12, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: September 12, 2012
Length: 0:01:51
Video Size: 91.3 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide external shot of the Cabinet headquarters in Cairo
2. Various shots of the press conference of Egypt’s PM Hesham Kandil
3. Medium shot of Egypt’s PM Hesham Kandil speaking during a press conference held at the Cabinet headquarters
4. Various shots of reporters listening and taking notes at the press conference
5. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egypt’s PM Hesham Kandil:
“The EGP 175 billion (USD 28.71 billion) deficit is more than expected. Last year, the budget deficit was expected to reach EGP 134 billion (USD 21.98 billion) but it has become EGP 175 billion. This increase in budget deficit burdens us to have to make up for it through borrowing.” 6. Various shots of the press conference and the attendees taking notes
7. Medium shot, cameramen shooting
8. Various shots of Kandil speaking during a press conference
9. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egypt’s PM Hesham Kandil:
“We are working on settling the budget deficit as one of the courses. The other course, which is relevant, is to increase investments, whether they are national or foreign investments. The targeted growth rate is from 4% to 4.5% by the end of this year, which, according to the government’s plan, requires investments of EGP 276 billion (USD 45.28 billion).” 10. Medium shot, cameramen shooting
11. Various shots of the press conference and the attendees
12. Wide shot of the press conference and Kandil speaking

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Protests in Egypt against President M...
Cairo, Egypt
By Daniel Crossman
24 Aug 2012

Thousands of protesters gathered on Friday, August 24, around the Presidential Palace area in Cairo, protesting against President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood.
The protesters, who included former liberal Parliamentarian Mohamed Abou Hamed, call for an end to the regime of President Morsi, the first freely elected president since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak in February 2011.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohie al-Manialawi, retired general and one of the protesters:
“President Mohamed Morsi wants to put the Muslim Brotherhood in all positions. We are the only country in the Middle East, or the world, that has a party based on religion. There are Muslims, Copts and many factions in the country. The President must be a president for all.” SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mina Fathy, a Copt activist and one of the protesters:
“We demand that Morsi understands now that the Egyptian people don’t want him. We ask him to leave quietly, without suffering what Hosni Mubarak or other presidents suffered. We want him to leave the country to someone who loves it.” The protesters chanted statements against Morsi and the MB, accusing Morsi of being a traitor who wants to monopolize power in Egypt.

However, a lot of Egyptians are against the protests, believing that the President and his government must be given enough time to work and resolve the country’s issues.
SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Essam Abdel-Malek, a citizen against the protest:
“The U.S. President won elections with a very small number of votes, but they all recognized him as president for all Americans. We should learn this. Morsi made democratic decisions such as releasing journalists from temporary detention during trials. We should wait and give a chance to this government to work in order not to interrupt people’s work and interests, so that the country goes on towards development.” The protesters were shouting slogans like "down with the rule of the Brotherhood”, calling for a civil state not a Brotherhood state.
The protesters were mostly supporters of the military, liberals, Copts and activists calling for an end to the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood, claiming that Morsi only represents the MB not all Egyptians.
No violence was reported during the protests.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: August 24, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: August 24, 2012
Length: 0:03:10
Video Size: 156 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Various shots of security men blocking the streets leading to the Presidential Palace with barbed wires
2- Various shots of rallies of protestors shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
3- Various shots of former liberal Parliamentarian Mohamed Abou Hamed leading a rally of protestors
4- Various shots of a massive protest around a street leading to the Presidential palace
5- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohie al-Manialawi, retired general and one of the protestors:
“President Mohamed Morsi wants to put the Muslim Brotherhood in all positions. We are the only country in the Middle East, or the world, that has a party based on religion. There are Muslims, Copts and many factions in the country. The President must be a president of all.” 6- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mina Fathy, a Copt activist and one of the protestors:
“We demand that Morsi understands now that the Egyptian people don’t want him. We ask him to leave quietly, without suffering what Hosni Mubarak or other presidents suffered. We want him to leave the country to someone who loves it.” 7- Various shots of rallies of protestors shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
8- Various shots of protestors spreading a huge flag of Egypt and shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
9- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Essam Abdel-Malek, a citizen who is against the protest:
“The U.S. President won elections with a very small number of votes, but they all recognized him as the president for all Americans. We should learn this. Morsi made democratic decisions such as releasing journalists from temporary detention during trials. We should wait and give a chance to this government to work in order not to interrupt people’s work and interests, so that the country goes on towards development.” 10- Various shots of security men blocking the streets leading to the Presidential Palace
11- Various shots of rallies of protestors shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
12- Medium shot, a woman at a protest shouting “Down with the Muslim Brotherhood!”
13- Various shots of protestors close to the barbed wires around the Presidential Palace
14- Various shots of protestors raising signs against the Muslim Brotherhood
15- Various shots of protests outside the Presidential Palace

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The Will Of Maickel
Caracas, Venezuela
By @LatAmSight
15 Aug 2012

Maickel Melamed was born in 1975 with a physical motor deficiency. In 2011 he ran the New York marathon. This year he will run in Berlin. Maickel has run five marathons in four years, when just one was supposedly impossible.

Maickel training indoors, B Roll:

“En ese momento cuando crees que no, es donde sigues. En ese momento donde todo te dice oscuridad, es donde tú crees en la luz así no la veas. Todo lo contrario: cuando no ves la luz, es cuando más la atraes."

“In that exactly moment when you think you can’t make it, you just have to keep going. That moment where everything says dark, is where you believe in light, even if you cannot see it. When you can’t see the light, is when you most attract it.”

Maickel training outdoors:

“Si a mí me dijeron que yo no iba a vivir, me dijeron que yo no iba a caminar, me dijeron que yo no iba a subir montañas, me dijeron que yo no iba a hablar bien y soy conferencista desde hace más de diez años.”

“I was told that I would die, that I would never walk, that I would never climb a mountain that I would never talk properly, and I have been speaking in lectures for more than 10 years.”

Maickel Melamed:

“A cada no le fuimos poniendo un sí, y ese es el sí que le queremos regalar a cada ser humano.”

“Instead of NO we say YES, and that YES is our gift to every single human being.”

Maritza de Melamed, Maickel's mother:

“Él, como dice su papá, como que se prueba y a la vez es algo como una función que él tiene una cosa que él tiene como un deber, cómo te puedo decir yo, como algo así que él mismo se lo ha propuesto.”

“He, as his father says, he (Maickel) tests himself, and at the same time it is like a duty he must accomplish, as I can tell you, he meets what he proposes.”

Maickel Melamed:

“Sentía que cada vez que yo hacía algo, que me llevaba más allá de mis propios límites, los límites de mi entorno también se expandían, entonces entendí que eso era quizá la diferencia que yo tengo para aportar.”

“I was feeling that every time that I’ve achieved something that took me beyond my limits, my limits were expanded as well, then I think that maybe that is the difference with what I have to give.”

Maickel training outdoors, B Roll:

“Y vivimos buscando nuestra diferencia y yo creo que esa es nuestra búsqueda primaria cuál es nuestra diferencia."

“We live looking for that which makes us different, I believe that this is our main basic quest, what sets us apart.”

Mr. and Mrs. Melamed, B Roll:

“Yo le diría a todos esos padres que tienen una situación como la que se me presentó a mí, de que..."

“I would to like say all those fathers who have a situation as I've been presented with Maickel, that...”

Alberto Melamed, Maickel's father:

“esos muchachos vinieron a esta vida por algo, y nosotros estamos en la obligación de darles todo el cariño y todo el apoyo que podemos darles para poderlos sacar adelante.”

“...this guy came into this life for something, and we are under the obligation to give them all the love and care, and all the support that we can, to keep them moving forward by themselves.”

Crossing the finish line, NY Marathon, B Roll: Natural Sounds

Maickel training, B Roll:

“El entrenamiento es muy intenso, son seis días a la semana, aproximadamente tres horas y media diarias a veces más, hay largos de ocho horas y media de entrenamiento.”

“Training is quite intense, six days per week, almost four hours per day, but sometimes we reach almost nine hours.”

Maickel Melamed:

“Es un entrenamiento muy intenso diseñado específicamente para mi persona, cada ser humano es diferente.”

“Is a very tough training, specially designed for me, every human is different.”

Photos:
“Esto es dedicado a todos esos seres humanos que tienen esos sueños adentro y que están esperando una chispita para despertarlos e ir en búsqueda de ellos.”

“This is dedicated to those human beings that have dreams, for those who are waiting for something to spark their life, wake up and go for it.”

End of NY Marathon, B Roll: Natural Sounds

Short Documentary
Country: Venezuela
Director: Placido Garrido
Editorial Producer: Alvaro Mendoza Saad
@LAtAmSight 2012

Restrictions: Featured and licensed by TELEMUNDO to all American continent (from Patagonia, Argentina to Alaska, USA)

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Indonesia trains surfing
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Anne DELAISTRE
10 Aug 2012

Indonesia lowers power lines to deter trains surfers

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Rwanda Reconciliation
Rwanda
By carloscastro
01 Jul 2012

SYNOPSIS
Nearly 20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, reconciliation between ex-prisoners and survivors has been a blessing and a curse, bringing villages together in forgiveness, while other victims live next-door to the very people who've committed atrocities that haven't been brought to justice.

"The first day we ex-prisoners and survivors sat face to face, we thought that the survivors would revenge. But they were also worried. They thought we had returned to commit another genocide," said a man who was imprisoned for eight years for the crimes he committed in 1994.

Reconciliation was the only way to survive and a political priority for the government that arose after the genocide and it is still in power. The justice of the Gacaca Courts — which were formed to convict people who committed war crimes — the government and the press all pushed on that direction of reconciliation. But at the same time, it has been imposed, a one-way process that created cracks. The suffering and the wounds of so many atrocities are still present today.

This documentary is part of a series called the ‘After Peace' project, which seeks to analyze and explain how four countries (Rwanda, Lebanon, Guatemala and Bosnia-Herzegovina) have dealt an armed conflict in their country in the last quarter of the 20th century.

Documentary collection can be viewed here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1254

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Morsi Takes Oath As Egypt’s First Ele...
Cairo, Egypt
By Daniel Crossman
30 Jun 2012

Egypt’s president-elect, Mohamed Morsi, took a formal oath of office before Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court on Saturday, June 30, as the country’s first freely elected civilian president.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egyptian president-elect Mohamed Morsi:
"I swear by Almighty Allah that I will sincerely preserve the republican system, respect the constitution and the law, look after the interests of the people completely, and protect the nation's independence and the safety of its lands."

Morsi addressed the Constitutional Court, noting that he respects the judiciary system and the legislative system, and that he will do his job to protect the independence of these authorities, stressing that Egypt would remain a strong country with the help of its people.
He highlighted that Egypt is a civil, constitutional and modern state.
President Morsi then headed to Cairo University for his official inauguration ceremony, where he addressed the nation before former MPs of Egypt’s houses of parliament and other political figures.
Head of Egypt’s Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, Chief of Staff Sami Annan, founder of the Constitution Party Mohamed ElBaradei, Egyptian scientist and Noble Prize Laureate Ahmed Zowail and PM Kamal El-Ganzouri attended the ceremony.
Morsi praised the armed forces for the critical role they played during the revolution that toppled Egypt’s former regime of Hosni Mubarak, noting that the army will return to their barracks with their original role of protecting the borders of the country.
Moris said that he would work to maintain national security and protect the borders of the nation along with the armed forces.
SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egyptian president-elect Mohamed Morsi:
"I will do my best to preserve our national security and protect the borders of this nation along with the Armed Forces, the shield and sword of the nation."

Morsi also expressed appreciation to the role played by judges, the armed forces and police officers for supervising and securing the elections process and ensuring its transparency.
He pledged to both Muslims and Christians to draw up a better future for Egypt and to fulfill the goals of the revolution: freedom, social justice and dignity.
Morsi addressed families of the revolution’s victims, vowing to bring justice for the casualties and injures of the revolution.
In a symbolic gesture, Morsi took an oath of office before tens of thousands of his supporters at Tahrir Square on Friday, June 29, where he delivered a speech to the nation, vowing to provide social justice and a good standard of living for all Egyptians.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: June 30, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: June 30, 2012
Length: 0:02:40
Video Size: 132 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Various external shots of Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court headquarters in Cairo
2- Various shots of Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi addressing judges of the constitutional court
3- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Egypt’s president-elect Mohamed Morsi:
"I swear by Almighty Allah that I will sincerely preserve the republican system, respect the constitution and the law, look after the interests of the people completely, and protect the nation's independence and the safety of its lands." 4- Wide external shot of Cairo University
5- Pan right shot of the attendees during the inauguration ceremony after Morsi swears in the oath of office
6- Medium shot of Morsi addressing the attendees during the ceremony
7- Medium shot of head of the SCAF Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, Chief of Staff Sami Anan, Egyptian scientist Ahmed Zoueil and founder of Constitution Party Mohamed El-Baradei seating in the first row, cheering while listening to Morsi speech
8- Medium shot of President Morsi addressing the attendees
9- Various shots of the ceremony
10- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Egypt’s president-elect Mohamed Morsi:
"I will do my best to preserve our national security and protect the borders of this nation along with the Armed Forces, the shield and sword of the nation." 11-
12- Medium shot of Morsi concluding his speech
13- Various shots of the attendees cheering
14- Various shots of Morsi greeting the people and leaving after finishing his speech

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Liberals and Leftists Form 'Third Cur...
Cairo, Egypt
By Daniel Crossman
29 Jun 2012

Egyptian legal experts, politicians, party leaders, political activists and human rights activists held a press conference on Thursday, June 28, to announce the formation of the "Third Current" bloc, to unite liberals and leftists against what they call Islamist and military domination of power.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Constitutional expert Mohamed Nour Farahat:
"It is a strong political and social current to unite the political forces that were divided following the revolution. It offers an alternative to the Islamist state and the military state, highlighting the political arena with the issues of society, development and justice, which have been completely ignored amid the conflicts and competition over power."

The participant parties include the Free Egyptians Party, Al-Tagammu Party, Al-Karama Party, the Socialist Popular Alliance Party, the Egyptian Social Democratic Party, the Equality and Development Party and Al-Dostour Party.

Speakers said that ‘the Third Current bloc represents the real majority of Egyptians who support the civil identity of the country,’ rejecting what's called ‘the marriage between religion and power and the militarization of the country.’

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Former MP Alaa Abdel-Moneim:
"The bloc’s slogan is: No to the marriage of religion and power, and no to militarizing the country. We seek the establishment of a civil state governed only by the constitution and the law. We do not accept using religion to achieve political purposes. We also reject military tyranny. We derive our rules and main strength from the public."

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian actress Tayseer Fahmy, Head of Equality and Development Party:
"When all civil forces unite, they will have the same opinion. Even after four years, when there will be presidential elections, all these forces and those believing in their principles will support a certain president. The same applies to parliamentary elections. So, it will create a kind of balance between powers so that neither party would dominate."

The participants reminded the newly elected president of "The Pledge Document,” which includes basic principles and demands for the new President of Egypt to be committed to, and stresses that Egypt is a civil democratic state whose official religion is Islam, and that the principles of the Islamic Law (Sharia) are the basic source of legislation.

The document also guarantees that the Islamists’ rise to power will not limit personal and public freedoms.

The Third Current bloc is intended to guarantee the principles of freedom, equality and social justice under Egypt's new administration and face what liberals and leftists refer to as Islamist and military fascism.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: June 28, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: June 28, 2012
Length: 0:02:42
Video Size: 133 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Wide shot, the attendees at the conference hall
2- Long shot, the speakers and the attendees upon the start of the press conference
3- Pan left, the speakers including constitutional expert Mohamed Nour Farahat, Mohamed Aboul-Ghar, head of the Egyptian Social Democratic Party, former liberal MP Amr Hamzawi, and others
4- Various shots of speakers during the press conference, including Aboul-Ghar and Hamzawi
5- Wide shot, the attendees at the conference hall
6- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Constitutional expert Mohamed Nour Farahat:
"It is a strong political and social current to unite the political forces that were divided following the revolution. It offers an alternative to the Islamist state and the military state, highlighting the political arena with the issues of society, development and justice, which have been completely ignored amid the conflicts and competition over power."
7- Wide shot, Hamzawi speaking during the press conference
8- Medium shot, Abdel-Ghaffar Shukr, Socialist Popular Alliance Party (SPA) member, speaking during the press conference
9- Wide shot, the press conference and the attendees
10- Medium shot, political activist George Ishaaq speaking during the press conference
11- Wide shot, the attendees at the conference hall
12- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Former MP Alaa Abdel-Moneim:
"The bloc’s slogan is: No to the marriage of religion and power, and no to militarizing the country. We seek the establishment of a civil state governed only by the constitution and the law. We do not accept using religion to achieve political purposes. We also reject military tyranny. We derive our rules and main strength from the public." 13- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Egyptian actress Tayseer Fahmy, Head of Equality and Development Party:
"When all civil forces unite, they will have the same opinion. Even after four years, when there will be presidential elections, all these forces and those believing in their principles will support a certain president. The same applies to parliamentary elections. So, it will create a kind of balance between powers so that neither party would dominate." 14- Various shots of the conference, speakers and attendees

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Al-Azhar and Sunni Scholars Warn Agai...
Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
20 May 2012

Cairo, Egypt | May 20, 2012

Egypt's Al-Azhar, widely regarded as the most respected authority for Sunni Muslims worldwide, warned against the practice of Shiite rituals like those referred to as "Hussainiat."

Grand Imam of Al-Azhar, Sheikh Ahmed al-Tayyib, held a meeting with Sunni clerics and scholars including from the Salafists, the Sufis, the Muslim Brotherhood, etc, and announced Al-Azhar's rejection of the practice of Shiite rituals in Sunni-majority Egypt.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Al-Azhar's Grand Imam, Sheikh Ahmed al-Tayyib:
"The honorable Azhar warns against the establishment of any sectarian mosques for a cretin sect or group secluded from the rest of the Muslim nation, causing division and threatening the spiritual and social unity of Egypt and its people, whether these mosques are called Hussainiat – which reveals a sectarian tendency strange to the Sunnis of Egypt - or any name other than 'the house of Allah' or 'the mosque'."

Sunnis make up the overwhelming majority of Egypt's Muslims. Estimates consistently place Sunnis at or above 90% of Egypt's 85-million people, and Shiites at less than 1% of the population.

Following Egypt's January 25 uprising there have been reports of attempts to spread Shiite beliefs in Egypt and an increase in the Shiite rituals called "Hussainiat," in which Shiites gather and beat their faces and bodies, lamenting the death of certain family members of Prophet Muhammad. Though Sunnis also revere family members of Prophet Muhammad, many consider these Shiite practices to be superstitious and deviant.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Sheikh Shiekh Hasan al-Shafi'e, Adviser of Al-Azhar's Grand Imam:
"We do not have suchlike sects or divisions. It is a very dangerous issue and it has grave consequences if it is allowed. So, besieging this leak was the concern of the clerics who attended today."

For his part, renowned Salafi Sheikh Muhammad stressed that the Sunnis of Egypt and worldwide love the family members of Prophet Muhammad yet they reject the Shiite rituals of mourning their deaths, which he said violates the right path in the Quran and the Sunnah (i.e. the Prophet's tradition).

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Salafi cleric Sheikh Muhammad Hassan:
"Al-Azhar was and is still and will still be a guardian of this path; the path of the Quran and the Sunnah (the Prophet's tradition) and the Sunni school. I would like to reaffirm that we all agreed that the people of Egypt love the family of the Messenger of Allah (Muhammad) peace and blessings be upon him, and they seek closeness to Allah through their love."

There are approximately 1.62 billion Muslims in the world according to a 2010 study by Pew Research Center. Most Muslims are Sunnis while the Shiites vary from 150 to 200 million worldwide, i.e. from 10% to 13% of the world Muslim population.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: May 20, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: May 20, 2012
Length: 0:02:57
Video Size: 146 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:

Tilt down, Al-Azhar administrative office in Cairo
Various shots of the meeting of Al-Azhar's Grand Imam, Sheikh Ahmed al-Tayyib with Sunni clerics and scholars including from the Salafists, the Sufis, the Muslim Brotherhood, etc
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Al-Azhar's Grand Imam, Sheikh Ahmed al-Tayyib:
"The honorable Azhar warns against the establishment of any sectarian mosques for a cretin sect or group secluded from the rest of the Muslim nation, causing division and threatening the spiritual and social unity of Egypt and its people, whether these mosques are called Hussainiat – which reveals a sectarian tendency strange to the Sunnis of Egypt - or any name other than 'the house of Allah' or 'the mosque'."
Various shots of the meeting of Al-Azhar's Grand Imam, Sheikh Ahmed al-Tayyib with Sunni clerics and scholars including from the Salafists, the Sufis, the Muslim Brotherhood, etc
Wide shot, a press conference after the meeting
SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Sheikh Shiekh Hasan al-Shafi'e, Adviser of Al-Azhar's Grand Imam:
"We do not have suchlike sects or divisions. It is a very dangerous issue and it has grave consequences if it is allowed. So, besieging this leak was the concern of the clerics who attended today." Various shots of the press conference
SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Salafi cleric Sheikh Muhammad Hassan:
"Al-Azhar was and is still and will still be a guardian of this path; the path of the Quran and the Sunnah (the Prophet's tradition) and the Sunni school. I would like to reaffirm that we all agreed that the people of Egypt love the family of the Messenger of Allah (Muhammad) peace and blessings be upon him, and they seek closeness to Allah through their love." Various external shots of
Al-Azhar administrative office in Cairo

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Egypt's Election Commission Promises ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
18 May 2012

Cairo, Egypt | May 19, 2012

Secretary-General of the Supreme Presidential Elections Commission (SPEC) Hatem Bagato said at a press conference held on Saturday, May 19, that Egypt's post-revolution presidential election would be free and fair.
Bagato showed during the conference a number of new security measures that will be used to ensure that the vote would be transparent and fair including ballots with embedded security stamps that cannot be photocopied and transparent folders in which judges monitoring the vote will place their results.
Bagato said that the number of those who have the right to vote in Egypt is around 50,407,266 voters, adding that several of those listed on the official voters' lists are suspected to be dead.
He affirmed that the SPEC did not receive conclusive information to confirm their deaths, noting that some of the death certificates have not been issued yet.
Bagato also touched on the issue of the veiled women voters, stressing that any veiled woman who refuses to raise the veil and reveal her face and hands would not allowed to vote, because this is the law, adding that the judges of Egypt would apply the law to protect the nation.
He added that there will be female observers to make it easier for the veiled women voters.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Secretary-General of the (SPEC) Hatem Bagato:
"God willing, we will put a woman among the observers as more than one observer will be present to make it easier for the voters. It will be a woman so the judge can use her for the detection of face and hands of the veiled voter to make sure that she is the one who casting her ballot and the judge has the right to check the identity of the voter by any means."
He said that there is coordination with the police to arrest anyone trying to violate the electoral silence period by making propaganda for any presidential candidate, especially outside polling stations.
Analysts said that authorities couldn't use violence against any voter.
SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Journalist at al-Shrouk newspaper, Ahmed Ghazy:
"I don't think that a policeman or army officer would use violence against voters. This won't happen as actually this didn't take place at the recent parliamentary elections of Egypt's two houses of the parliament "the People's Assembly and the Shura Council, therefore this won't happen in Egypt's upcoming presidential elections". Bagato also denied that there was any fraud in the elections committees which took place abroad, pointing out that they discovered that the problem was mostly errors from the voters or the data.
Egypt's first presidential elections will take place over two days on May 23-24 and the runoff, if needed will be held on June 16-17.
It marks the first time that Egyptians will choose their leader in a race overseen by international monitors.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: May 19, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: May 19, 2012
Length: 0:02:26
Video Size: 120 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS
SHOTLIST:
Wide shot of banners of the Supreme Presidential Elections Commission (SPEC) as well as its flag and the Egyptian flag
Wide shot of the attendees at the press conference held by the (SPEC)
Medium shot of Secretary-General of the (SPEC) Hatem Bagato speaking during the press conference
Medium shot of cameramen shooting during the conference
Various shots of the press conference
Various shots of statements explained by Bagato appearing via a monitor screen

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Egypt's Presidential Candidates Speak...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
18 May 2012

Cairo, Egypt | May 17, 2012

Among the pressing issues on the agendas of Egypt's top presidential candidates is the military institution, and how they will deal with the currently ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces if elected.

Presidential candidate Amr Moussa, former Arab League Chief, believes that the authority of the SCAF will be limited to running the military affairs, yet he believes that the military rule of Egypt for six decades should be considered while dealing with the SCAF.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Presidential candidate Amr Moussa:
"The SCAF that you know now will not be the same after July 1st. It will be the SCAF that only runs the affairs of Armed Forces. As for the state, it will be run by its institutions. The military is one of the important institutions in Egypt and must be dealt with, especially because there was military rule in Egypt for over 60 years. This should be taken into consideration."

For his part, presidential candidate Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh said that if elected he will not allow any institution, including the military, to be treated favorably or fall outside the law of the constitution. Rather, he said, for him the military will be counted among "the tools" of the political leadership of the country.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Presidential candidate Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh:
"We will not allow any institution, including the military, to be above the constitution. Rather, the military and the Egyptian army, which we endear and work toward making it the strongest in the region, will be among the tools of the political leadership of the nation. "

According to Hamdeen Sabbahi, the Nasserite presidential candidate, former parliamentarian and political activist, the Egyptian military must be dealt with "respectfully,” but stressing that the military's only role is to protect Egypt without interfering in the country's political affairs.

SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Presidential candidate Hamdeen Sabbahi:
"I want to deal with the army respectfully, by enabling it to do its duty, providing it with the means of strength, affirming the variety of its weapon sources, verifying its fighting readiness for doing its duties, along with stressing that the only rule of the Egyptian military is preserving the security, independence and safety of the nation's territories without interfering in the internal affairs, politics or party arguments."

Presidential candidate Ahmed Shafik, Mubarak's last prime minister who held his appointment for less than a month, is accused by some revolutionary and Islamist voices of being "the SCAF presidential candidate.”

Shafik said that if he is elected, SCAF Chief, Field Marshall Hussein Tantawi, cannot remain as minister of defense and will not be his vice-president, stating that his cooperation with Tantawi "will be in a different form" that he cannot reveal at the moment.

The Muslim Brotherhood's presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi, stated that the end of June is "a red line" for the SCAF to hand over power to the coming civilian president, and that the people will not wait one moment after that.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: May 17, 2012 [and recent archive]
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: May 17, 2012
Length: 0:02:39
Video Size: 131 MB
Language:
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Various shots of billboards in the streets for presidential candidate Amr Moussa
2. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) - Presidential candidate Amr Moussa:
"The SCAF that you know now will not be the same after July 1st. It will be the SCAF that only runs the affairs of the Armed Forces. As for the state, it will be run by its institutions. The military is one of the important institutions in Egypt and must be dealt with, especially since there has been military rule in Egypt over the past 60 years. This should be taken into consideration." 3. Zoom in, a large billboard of Presidential candidate Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh on top of a high building
4. Various shots of Aboul Foyouh speaking on stage during a public conference in Alexandria amid thousands of attendees (Archive)
5. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Presidential candidate Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh:
"We will not allow any institution, including the military, to be above the constitution. Rather, the military and the Egyptian army, which we endear and work on making the strongest in the region, are among the tools of the political leadership of the nation. "

Medium shot, a large billboard of Presidential candidate Hamdeen Sabbahi on top of a high building
6. Various shots of Sabbahi in a previous conference (Archive)
7. SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Presidential candidate Hamdeen Sabbahi:
"I want to deal with the army respectfully, by enabling it to do its duty, providing it with the means of strength, affirming the variety of its weapon sources, verifying its readiness for doing its duties, along with stressing that the only rule of the Egyptian military is preserving the security, independence and safety of the nation's territories without interfering in the internal affairs, politics or party arguments."
8. Various shots of billboards in the streets for presidential candidate Ahmed Shafik
9. Medium shot, Shafik speaking during a press conference (Archive)
10. Various shots of billboards in the streets for presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi
11. Medium shot, Morsi speaking during a public conference (Archive)
12. Wide shot, overview of Cairo and the River Nile