Frame 0004
The Amazonian Rain Forest: Farming an...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
20 Sep 2016

This collection highlights the deforestation of the Amazon due to cattle farming and corn farming. Various shots provide a look at the rain forest in its virgin state; workers felling trees to clear the land; a fire at night from slash and burn agriculture; a cattle ranch on cleared rain forest and a corn farm on cleared rain forest land. 

Frame 0004
Fire in the Amazonian Rain Forest (Sl...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain Forest using the slash and burn technique.

Frame 0004
Cattle Ranch in the Amazonian Rain Fo...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a cattle ranch in the Amazonian Rain Forest built on cleared Amazonian Rain Forest.

Frame 0004
Corn Farm in the Amazonian Rain Forest
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of a corn farm featuring wide, sweeping vistas of corn and irrigation equipment in the Brazilian province of Minas Gerais. The corn farm was built on cleared rain forest land.

Frame 0004
Deforestation in the Amazonian Rain F...
Amazon
By Illuminati Filmes
19 Sep 2016

Various shots of workers clearing and moving trees in the Amazonian Rain Forest using heavy equipment, bulldozers and front-loaders.

Thumb sm
Brazilian Families Affected by Zika i...
Recife
By Flavio Forner
26 Jan 2016

Photos of Brazilian families affected by the outbreak of the Zika virus in the city of Recife, in northeast Brazil, as mothers seek help for their babies born with microcephaly.

The Brazilian army is deployed on the streets of Recife in a door-to-door campaign in search of vestiges of Aedes mosquito larvae, responsible for spreading the Zika virus. The population receives instructions on how best to protect and prevent the emergence of mosquitoes in their homes.

The Zika virus, first detected about 40 years ago in Uganda, has long been seen as a less-painful cousin to Dengue and Chikunguya, which are spread by the same Aedes mosquito. Brazilian health authorities are convinced that microcephaly is related to the Zika virus when a pregnant woman is bitten by this insect. This rare condition known as microcephaly often results in mental retardation.

Thumb sm
Doctor Constancia Ayres, a scientist ...
Recife
By Flavio Forner
25 Jan 2016

Doctor Constancia Ayres is an entomologist and lead research scientist at the Recife branch of Brazil’s foremost public-health research institute, the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz).

With a PHD in Biology, Dr Constancia Ayres is studying the Zika virus in mosquitoes and its transmission to humans. She published several research studies on the subject including “Identification of Zika virus vectors and implications for control”, in February 2016.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 19
Recife
By Flavio Forner
20 Jan 2016

Mother holds her baby, born with microcephaly, waiting medical attention at Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, Brazil.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 20
Recife
By Flavio Forner
20 Jan 2016

Pregnant woman waits for consultation at a clinic in Recife, Brazil.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 17
Recife
By Flavio Forner
19 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator, takes her 4 month-old daughter Alice to a medical consultation by Dr. Vanessa Van Der Linden. Alice was born with microcephaly.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 18
Recife
By Flavio Forner
19 Jan 2016

Dr. Vanessa Van Der Linden measures Alice's skull. The 4 month-old baby was born with microcephaly. Alice's mother is Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 07
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Recife's Health Department workers and soldiers from the Brazilian military work together in detecting mosquito outbreaks.The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 08
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A Brazilian army soldier checking a house in Recife for Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the Aedes Aegypti. The city now gets the help of the Brazilian military in detecting mosquito outbreaks.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 09
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A Brazilian army soldier and Recife's Health Department worker talk to local resident to check for Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes. The municipality in Recife wants to introduce penalties for its citizens who don't follow the instructions on preventing the spread of the Aedes aegypti. The city now gets the help of the Brazilian military in detecting mosquito outbreaks.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 10
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

A biologist works in a laboratory at Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 11
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 12
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil, where she studies the evolution of the mosquito since Africa. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 13
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

The mosquito Aedes aegypti spreads four different types of Dengue and Chikungunya, and now the Zika virus.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 14
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Biologist Constancia Ayres from Fiocruz Research Institute in Recife, Brazil, where she studies the evolution of the mosquito since Africa. Across the country, scientists race against the clock to develop a vaccine for the Zika virus. Other scientists from Africa and the US flew to Brazil to help.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 15
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

Because of the mild symptoms of Zika virus, few people visit a doctor so the government does not know how many Brazilians are already infected. Pernambuco state is the leader with 33 percent probability of microcephaly. The regional government declared a state of emergency in last September.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 16
Recife
By Flavio Forner
18 Jan 2016

The mosquito Aedes aegypti spreads four different types of Dengue and Chikungunya, and now the Zika virus.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 01
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Dr. Angela Rocha, 67, infectologist at the Oswaldo Cruz hospital in Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil).

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 02
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Mothers awaiting care in the waiting room at Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 03
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator with her 4 month-old daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 04
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Erika Roque with her son Eric, born with microcephaly, at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, where he receives physical therapy.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 05
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Dr. Angela, infectious disease specialist at the Oswaldo Cruz Hospital in Recife, shows an image of the skull of a child with microcephaly.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 06
Recife
By Flavio Forner
17 Jan 2016

Rafael, an official from Recife's Health Department at a meeting on actions to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, insect that spreads the Zika virus.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 21
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, luggage worker at Recife airport, holds his daughter Alice, one of many Brazilian babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 22
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Jonathan Gomes Bezerra, a 14 year-old student, holds his sister Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in the recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 23
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Nadja Gomes Bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator baths her daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 24
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, worker at Recife airport, and Nadja Gomes bezerra, 42, a telemarketing operator, with their daughter Alice, one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
zika in brazil 25
Recife
By Flavio Forner
16 Jan 2016

Joao Bezerra, 46, luggage worker at Recife airport, holds his crying daughter Alice. She is one of many Brazilians babies born in recent months with microcephaly: a skull that is smaller at birth than 32 cm.

Thumb sm
Sample media
BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY
Campina Grande, Paraiba State
By Daniel Ramalho
31 Aug 2015

Campina Grande, Paraiba, Brazil 23/02/16 - BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY - Doctor Adriana Melo poses for a photo on her clinic at city of Campina Grande, state of Paraiba that is facing a large increase on new borns microcephaly cases. Doctor Melo was the first medical to relate Zika virus with microcephaly cases. Photo: Daniel Ramalho for The Globe and Mail

Thumb sm
Sample media
BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY
Campina Grande, Paraiba State
By Daniel Ramalho
31 Aug 2015

Campina Grande, Paraiba, Brazil 23/02/16 - BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY - An visual exam is displayed at a computar whiles Doctor Adriana Melo exams a pregnant woman in her clinic at city of Campina Grande, state of Paraiba that is facing a large increase on new borns microcephaly cases. Doctor Melo was the first medical to relate Zika virus with microcephaly cases. Photo: Daniel Ramalho for The Globe and Mail

Thumb sm
Sample media
BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY
Campina Grande, Paraiba State
By Daniel Ramalho
31 Aug 2015

Campina Grande, Paraiba, Brazil 23/02/16 - BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY - Doctor Adriana Melo gives an interview at her clinic in city of Campina Grande, state of Paraiba that is facing a large increase on new borns microcephaly cases. Doctor Melo was the first medical to relate Zika virus with microcephaly cases. Photo: Daniel Ramalho for The Globe and Mail

Thumb sm
Sample media
BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY
Campina Grande, Paraiba State
By Daniel Ramalho
31 Aug 2015

Campina Grande, Paraiba, Brazil 23/02/16 - BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY - Doctor Adriana Melo gives an intervied at her clinic in city of Campina Grande, state of Paraiba that is facing a large increase on new borns microcephaly cases. Doctor Melo was the first medical to relate Zika virus with microcephaly cases. Photo: Daniel Ramalho for The Globe and Mail

Thumb sm
Sample media
BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY
Campina Grande, Paraiba State
By Daniel Ramalho
31 Aug 2015

Campina Grande, Paraiba, Brazil 23/02/16 - BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY - Doctor Adriana Melo poses for a photo on her clinic at city of Campina Grande, state of Paraiba that is facing a large increase on new borns microcephaly cases. Doctor Melo was the first medical to relate Zika virus with microcephaly cases. Photo: Daniel Ramalho for The Globe and Mail

Thumb sm
Sample media
BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY
Campina Grande, Paraiba State
By Daniel Ramalho
31 Aug 2015

Campina Grande, Paraiba, Brazil 23/02/16 - BRAZIL ZIKA MICROCEPHALY - Doctor Adriana Melo exams a pregnant woman in her clinic at city of Campina Grande, state of Paraiba that is facing a large increase on new borns microcephaly cases. Doctor Melo was the first medical to relate Zika virus with microcephaly cases. Photo: Daniel Ramalho for The Globe and Mail

Thumb sm
The Gentle Fighter: Brazil's Blind Ju...
Rio de Janeiro
By Antonio Franco
21 Apr 2015

When witnessing the deafening thuds and desperate groans of Judo practitioners, gentleness, or "Ju" as the Japanese say, is the last thing that crosses your mind. This is less so when you come face to face with Willians Araujo da Silva, a 23-year-old, 250 lbs Judo black belt that promises to shine for Brazil in next year's Paralympics, which will be in his home country.

When you first meet him, it is not immediately obvious that he is blind. Mr. Silva’s composure and sense of direction are nearly superhuman. It is only when he sticks out his hand to greet you that you notice it is angled just a few degrees off and he does not have his sense of sight. Yet still, his sense of direction and space is so good that it crates a lingering doubt as to whether he really is blind or not. It is only when you see him kick a wall inadvertently or nearly fall in the gap between the subway car and the platform that you are truly convinced.

“You should come see my place”, he said brimming with pride after practice. His home is actually bland middle class apartment in a bad part of town that most people would find underwhelming. “The worst part about my old place was waking up in the morning and being ankle deep in water in your own bedroom. Oh the and rats too”. He recalled and seemingly trying to forget at the same time.

Mr. Silva was raised in Favela do Alemão, one of the most notorious slums in Rio de Janeiro. His new apartment, which he bought with his Judo winnings, is located not far from his old place, despite being worlds better. Although he’s happy with his own place, he bubbles with joy when boasting that he was also able to buy his parents a modest, but dignified house too.

“...Does it pay?” His father asked years ago when Mr. Silva began practicing the sport. “Not really”, he told his dad. “Well then get a real job, something that pays”, was his no nonsense fatherly response.

Despite the lack of support from his then skeptical family, he bravely continued though their doubt. After the 2011 Parapan games in Mexico, where he unexpectedly placed 2nd, a local Brazilian TV crew interviewed him. His father coincidentally happened to be watching. It was then Mr. Silva said, that his family realized his potential. What makes Mr. Silva stand out though, is his Ju, his gentleness. Someone in Mr. Silva’s shoes would be understandably frustrated. Frustrated at not being able to see the look of joy on his mothers face when she says he’s a gift from God. Frustrated from often stumbling into the various obstacles life throws at him. Frustrated from the regret of loosing his sight at age 11 from a fireworks accident. But he manages the opposite; to count his blessings not dwell on his curses. The irony is that if he hadn’t lost his vision, he likely would have wound up just another forgotten slum dweller creatively trying to make ends meet. Instead, his blindness has opened doors he would not have seen otherwise. The secret to Judo they say is to use your opponents force against him. Mr. Silva can teach us that perhaps there is some wisdom to found in our misfortune, some gentler way through life.